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VrtKELl 



LBY 

LIBRARY 

UNiveKsmr op 

CALIFORNIA 




ENDOWMENTS 



OF THE 



UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE 



ILonl^on: C. J. CLAY akd SONS, 

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS WABBHOUSB, 

AVE MARIA LANE, 

•lugoto: fiO, WELLINGTON STREET. 




%tX9}i%: F. A. BR0GKHAU8. 

Ilctoo fforfc: THE MACHILLAN COMPANY. 

iSoMbat ant ffalnitta: MACMILLAN AND CO.. Ltd. 



[All RighU re$erved.] 



ENDOWMENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE 



EDITED BY 



JOHN WILLIS CLARK, M.A., 

REGISTRARY OF THE UNIVERSITY ; 
FORMERLY FELLOW OF TRINITY COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE 




CAMBRIDGE 

Printed at the University Press 
1904 



CambtOrge: 

PBIMTBD BT J. AND 0. F. OLAT, 
AT THE UNIYEB8ITT PRB88. 



IF 10^ 

r6cs 



PREFACE. 

THE idea of printing and publishing deeds of trust, and 
deeds of foundation concerning offices held in the 
University, originated with the Reverend William Webb, D.D., 
Master of Clare College 1815-1856. When he was Vice- 
Chancellor for the first time he printed documents relating 
to three Professorships, viz. the Plumian, the Woodwardian, 
the Lucasian, and to the Arabic Lectureship or Professorship 
founded by Sir Thomas Adams. Each of these four offices 
has a small octavo tract to itself, separately paged, without 
title-page, and without cover. Dr Webb's intentions are set 
forth in the following note, which precedes the account of the 
Plumian Professorship : 

Clare Hall Lodge, 
Apnl 7, 1818. 

Some Members of the Senate having expressed to the Vice- 
Chancbllor their wishes that he would print and circulate in the 
University the Wills, the Deeds of Foundations, and the Statutes of 
the respective Professorships, in order that the Professors may know 
what are required of them and the conditions under which they accept 
of their said Professorships : he complies with the wishes of these 
Members, not in the least intending by this compliance to interfere 
with the present professors of these Professorships, most of whom have 
been admitted into them in ignorance of the particular regulations by 
which they were to be governed. 

With these modest contributions to history Dr Webb's 
labours ended ; and no further steps were taken to continue 
what he had begun until 1857, when the Reverend Henry 
Philpott, D.D., Master of S. Catharine's College 1845-1861, 
published Trusts, Statvtes and Directions affecting the Pro- 
fessorships of the University, It is an octavo volume of 



401. 



vi Preface 

112 pages, with no author's name on the title-page, but the 
ascription of it to Dr Philpott is rendered certain by the 
following letter, attached to the cover of the copy preserved 
in the Registry : 

Catharine Lodge, 

12 Jan. 1867. 
My dear Romillt, 

I send you a copy of the little book of Trust Deeds etc. 
concerning Professorships which you have so kindly helped me to 
prepare for the use of the Council and of the Senate. It will be 
followed by two more, one concerning Scholarships and Prizes, and 
the other concerning certain other Gifts and Endowments. I will 
send you copies of them when they are ready. 

Yours very truly, 

H. PHILPOTT, V.C. 

These subsequent publications duly appeared in the 
course of the year. The pagination is carried through the 
series, and they can therefore be readily bound together. 
In that condition they form a volume of 312 pages, but there 
is no general title or table of contents. It is noteworthy 
that while the words Trusts Statutes and Directions appear 
on the title-pages, the label on the back has the words 
Endowments of the University of Cambridge printed on it. 
The work is extremely well done. The documents have all 
been accurately transcribed and collated with their originals, 
with the help, as we are now informed, of Mr Romilly 
(Registrary 1832-1862). I have used most of Dr Philpott's 
transcripts in the preparation of my own work, and have 
detected very few errors of importance. 

In 1876 Dr Philpott's volume was reissued, with a new 
title-page, and new tables of contents, but the older portion 
was not altered in any way as regards new matter. The 
documents which had accumulated since 1857 were sorted 
into their proper places at the end of each division of the 
original work. This was done, I believe, by the present 
Lord Bishop of Bristol, the Right Reverend George Forrest 
Browne. 

The preparation of new editions of the Endowments has 
now become one of the duties of the Registrary; and I regret 



PrefcLce vii 

that through other engagements the completion of this volume 
has been so long delayed. This delay has been increased, 
to some extent, by the view which I have taken of the way 
in which the book ought to be produced; and I have to 
thank the Syndics of the University Press for allowing me 
a free hand in this important matter. 

In the first place, I hold that mere documents, printed 
without notes or preface, are of very little use. I have 
therefore introduced each document, or group of documents, 
with a certain amount of explanation. 

Secondly, I have given an account of several oflBces, as 
for instance of Professorships, which have not been endowed 
by external liberality, because, as they increase the usefulness 
of the University as a place of education, they may rightly 
be regarded as part of its general endowment. 

Thirdly, every present made to the University ought, in 
my judgment, to be treated as an Endowment, and recorded 
in such a work as this, so that the benefactor who gave it 
may receive his proper acknowledgement. In this part of my 
work, however, I felt that some limit was necessary, and 
therefore I have recorded those gifts only which have been 
formally accepted by Grace of the Senate. I regret to find 
that in this important matter our practice has not been 
uniform. In the course of my work I have observed that 
numerous gifts, quite as important as those honoured by 
special thanks, have been placed in our collections without 
any public recognition whatever. This carelessness is not 
characteristic of any special period, but appears to have 
always been a part of our habitual practice. 

Fourthly, I have included a few benefactions, which, 
having either been intended for a special purpose at the 
moment of donation, or made terminable after a certain 
period, run a risk of being forgotten altogether. I allude to 
the Buchanan Prizes, Dr Whewell's Moral Philosophy Prizes, 
and the like. 

The table of contents shews that the documents here 
printed have been sorted under certain obvious heads, as, for 
instance. Professorships, Lectureships, Scholarships, Prizes, 



viii Prefdce 

etc. This arrangement, though obviously unavoidable, stands 
in the way of any comprehensive view of what was being 
done in the University at a given time. I have therefore 
added at the end a chronological table in which the more 
important endowments are all recorded. By help of this 
table it will, I hope, be possible to use the book either as 
a cartulary, or as a history of the progress of education at 
Cambridge. 

In conclusion, I wish to point out that the Booh of 
Endowments is intended to be a companion to the Booh 
of Statutes and to the Booh of Ordinances, and, to a certain 
extent, to the Architectural History also. I have done my 
best, by the introduction of frequent references, to make this 
interdependence apparent. 

I have to thank my friend the Rev. E. G. Swain, M.A., 
Assistant Registrary, for kindly correcting the proofs of the 
Index. 

JOHN WILLIS CLARK. 



Reoistrt of the Univebsitt, 
1 Juney 1904. 



CONTENTS. 



I. Real Estate, Tithe, Rent-charges. 

1. Benefaction of King Henry the Seventh, 1504 

A. Deed of foundation, 20 Nov. 1504 

B. Decree of Court of Augmentations, 12 Oct. 1544. 

2. Rectory of Burwell, Cambridgeshire, 1544 

A. Deed between University and Sir E. North, 4 Oct. 1544 

B. Letters patent of King Henry the Eighth, 28 Nov. 1544 

3. Bene£Gu;tion of John Mere, 156&>59 .... 

Deed between University and Mere's executors, 1 March, 1559 

4. Archbishop Parker's gift of University Street, 1574 

Deed between the Archbishop, the University, and the College 
of Corpus Christi and Blessed Mary, 6 Aug. 1574 

5. Estate at Barton, Cambridgeshire, 1681 . 

6. Hospital of S. Mary Magdalene, Sturbridge, 1817 . 

7. Purchase of part of site of Downing College, 1897-1902 



PAOE 

3 

4 

8 

9 

11 

15 

19 
20 
21 

22 
24 
24 
25 



11. Royal Grants and Letters, Acts of 
Parliament. 

1. Letters patent of King Henry the Eighth granting three 

Stationers or Printers, 20 July, 1634 .... 31 

2. Qrant of Arms to the University, 9 June, 1573 . 32 

3. Qrant of Arms to the Five Regius Professors, 8 Nov. 1590 33 

4. Letters patent of King James the First, granting two 

burgesses in Parliament, 12 March, 1603-4 . 35 

5. Letters patent of King James the First, giving the 

rectories of Somersham and Terrington to the Uni- 
versity for the benefit of the Regius and Lady Margaret's 
Professorships of Divinity, 26 August, 1606 ... 38 

6. Act of Parliament : the Universities of Oxford and Cam- 

bridge to present to livings the patrons of which are 
Roman Catholics, 1606 40 

C. b 



X CorUefrUs 

PAGE 

7. Order of Council, giving leave to University to print 

Almanacks, 10 December, 1623 41 

8. Order of Council, giving leave to University to print 

Bibles and Prayer-books, 16 April, 1629 ... 41 

9. Act of Parliament confirming and rendering more effectual 

certain letters patent of King James the First (see 

No. 5), 22 May, 1712 43 

10. Appointment of Preachers at Whitehall by Kii\g George 

the First, 20 March, 1724 46 

11. Act of Parliament to enable the two Universities in 

England... to hold in perpetuity their copyrights in 
books given or bequeathed to them, 22 May, 1775 . 46 

12. Act of Parliament granting a certain annual sum to the 

Universities of Oxford and Cambridge in lieu of the 
privilege to print Almanacks, 5 July, 1781 . 47 

13. Act of Parliament to amend the law of copyright, 1 July, 

1842 48 

14. Act of Parliament to disannez Rectory of Somersham 

from Regius Professorship of Divinity, 18 August, 1882 50 

III. Foundations with more than one 
Object. 

1. Benefactions of the Lady Margaret, 1502-4 . . 57 

A. Foundation of a Readership in Divinity, with statutes 

for the same, 8 September, 1502 .... 58 

B. Foundation of a Preachership, with statates for the 

same, 30 October, 1504 65 

C. Deed by which the Abbot and Convent of Westminster 

agree to pay the Reader £13. 6«. 8(2. annually, 

1 July, ISOS- 70 

D. Similar agreement to pay the Preacher £10 annually, 

6 November, 1605 72 

E. Letters patent of King Henry the Eighth, 26 June, 

1542, oonfirming a decree of the Court of Aug- 
mentations, dated 10 June, 1542, that the stipend 
of the Reader shall be continued .... 73 

P. Corresponding documents for the Preacher, 16 June, 1542 75 

G. Conveyance of a garden to the Reader, 14 January, 1625 77 

H. Letter of King Charles the Second, dispensing the 
Preacher from sermons elsewhere than in the Uni- 
versity, 80 October, 1679 79 

2. Benefaction of Thomas Plume, 1704 -79 

A. Extract from Plume's Will, 2 September, 1704 . . 82 



Contents 



XI 



PAOE 

B. Covenant of the Master and Seniors of Trinity College, 

9 February, 1705-6 88 

C. Letters patent of Queen Anne, 11 June, 1707 83 

D. Schedule of estate at Balsham 88 

3. Benefaction of William Worts, 1709 89 

Extracts from Worts* Will, 21 June, 1709 .... 90 

4. Benefection of Robert Smith, 1768 93 

Extract from Smith's WiU, 6 May, 1766 .... 95 

5. Benefaction of Sir William Browne, 1774 ... 96 

A. Will of Sir William Browne, 11 February, 1772 . 98 

B. Grace to appoint the first scholar, 8 May, 1775 . 101 

C. Grace to appoint a Syndicate to decide the number of 

the electors, and the mode of electing the scholar, 

10 April, 1782 102 

D. Bules for the choice of a scholar, 18 April, 1782 102 

E. Augmentation of the Medals by the Earl of Powis, 1866 104 

6. Benefaction of John Norris, 1770 104 

A. Extract from Norris's Will, 26 June, 1770 ... 106 

B. A copy of what is written in the book covered with 

marble paper, all of the Testator's own handwriting 106 

a. The Professorship 108 

6. The English Essay 112 

c. The Annual Sermon .... 113 

d. Annual gift of books to prisoners in Uni- 

versity Gaol 114 

C. Extract from Will, 8 October, 1846, and Codicil, 

16 August, 1852, of Benedict Chapman, D.D. 116 

D. Benefaction of Lord Wodehouse, 13 April, 1853 . 117 

7. Benefaction of John Hulse, 1790 117 

8. Portrait, Prize, and Scholarship in memory of Richard 

Person, 1816, 1848 121 

I. Engraving of Person's portrait 122 

II. Person Prize, 28 May, 1816 124 

III. Person Scholarship, 12 May, 1848 .... 127 

9. Benefaction of Richard Sheepshanks and Anne Sheep- 

shanks, 1859, 1863 . 131 

Gift of Miss Sheepshanks to the Observatory, 1863 . . 132 

Deed of trust, 1 February, 1859 133 

10. Bene&ction of William Whewell, 1866 .... 136 

I. Extract from Dr Whewell's Will dated 17 December, 

1863 136 

n. Opinion of Counsel, 12 March, 1867 .... 189 

11. Benefaction of Rebecca Flower Squire, 1898 ... 140 

Declaration of Trust, 8 August, 1902 141 

Scheme for the management and regulation of the Scholar- 
ships in Law 146 

62 



xii Contents 

IV. Professorships. 

PlOB 

1. Divinity, Greek, Hebrew, Law, Physic (Regius), 1640 163 

A. Letters patent of King Henry the Eighth, 1540 . 156 

B. SUtntes of Philip and Mary for Trinity College, Gap. 41 156 

C. Letters patent of King Charles the Second, 1661 . . 161 

D. Act of Parliament 3 and 4 Vict. c. 113 .. . 162 
£. Scheme of Ecclesiastical Commissioners for annexing 

oanonries in Ely Cathedral to the Professorships 
of Hebrew and Greek, 11 August 1848 . . .163 
F. Extract from Will of George Jeremy, M.A., 25 March, 

1871 166 

2. Mathematics (Henry Lucas), 1663 165 

A. Statutes for the Professor, 19 December, 1663 166 

B. Letters patent of King Charles the Second, 18 January, 

1664 170 

C. Letters patent of King Charles the Second, 20 April, 

1676 171 

3. Arabic (Sir Thomas Adams), 1666 172 

A. The Vice-Chancellor and Heads of Colleges to Mr Adams, 

9 May, 1636 173 

B. Deed of foundation, 20 June, 1666 .... 174 

C. Extract from Will of Rev. John Palmer, B.D. . 177 

4. Moral Theology (John Knightbridge), 1677 ... 178 

5. Music, 1684 180 

6. Chemistry, 1703 181 

7. Anatomy, 1707 182 

8. Modem History (Regius), 1724 183 

Historical Library 184 

A. Letter of King George the First, 16 May, 1724 . . 185 

B. Thanks of the University. 19 May, 1724 ... 186 

C. Letters patent of King George the First, 28 September, 

1724 188 

D. Letters patent of King George the Second, 11 April, 1728 191 

9. Arabic : the Lord Almoner's Reader or Professor, 1724 . 193 

10. Botany, 1724 194 

11. Geology (John Woodward), 1727 196 

A. Extract from Woodward's Will, 21 October, 1727 . 196 

12. Astronomy and Geometry (Thomas Lowndes), 1748 202 

A. Statutes made by George Earl of Macclesfield . . 205 

13. Natural and Experimental Philosophy (Rev. Rich. Jackson), 

1783 206 

A. Extract from Jackson's Will, 20 February, 1775 . 208 

Extract from a second codicil to above Will, 25 July, 1781 211 

Sketch of Lectures in Practical Philosophy . . 211 



Canlents xiii 

PAGB 

14. Laws of Eqgland, Medicine (Downing College), 1800 217 

15. Mineralogy, 1808 218 

A. Detennination of Sir John Biohardson, 1 December, 1827 219 

16. Archaeology (John Disney) 220 

I. Mr Disne/s collection of ancient marbles, 1850 . 220 

II. The Disney Professorship of Archaeology, 1851 222 

A. Deed of Trast, 28 May, 1851 .... 223 

17. Political Economy, 1863 225 

18. Zoology and Comparative Anatomy, 1866 226 

19. Sanskrit, 1867 227 

20. Anglo-Saxon (Elrington and Bosworth), 1867 ... 228 

A. Deed of Trast, 2 December, 1867 228 

21. Latin, 1869 234 

A. Letter from Bev. W. G. Clark to Yice-Chanoellor, 14 Dec. 

1868 234 

B. Letter from Trustees of Kennedy Subscription Fund 

to Yioe-Ghanoellor, 14 Dec. 1868 .... 235 

G. Deed of Trust, 1 May, 1869 236 

D. Schedule (Begulations) referred to in the above Deed . 237 

22. Fine Art (FeHx Slade), 1869 240 

A. Extract from codicil to Slade's Will, 25 March, 1868 . 240 

B. Deed of Trust, 17 June, 1869 241 

23. Experimental Physics, 1871 247 

24. Mechanism and Applied Mechanics, 1875 248 

25. Ecclesiastical History (Dixie), 1882 248 

26. Divinity (Ely), 1882 249 

27. Physiology, 1883 250 

28. Surgery, 1883 250 

29. Pathology, 1883 251 

30. Mental Philosophy and Logic, 1896 252 

31. Chinese, 1897 252 

32. Ancient History, 1898 254 

33. Agriculture, 1899 254 



V. Lectureships and Readerships. 

1. Benefaction of Sir Robert Rede, 1524 .... 261 

Declaration of Trust, 10 December, 1624 .... 262 

2. Benefaction of Lady Sadleir, 1706 268 



XIV 



Contents 



6. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 
10. 



Benefaction of the Royal Geographical Society, 1887 

Benefaction of Mr C. G. Montefiore, 1891 

A. Deed to seoore annoal payment of £250, 10 February, 
1892 



B. Second deed, 3 June, 1902 . 
Benefaction of Samuel Sandars, M.A., 1894 
Englifih Lectureship Fund, 1896 
Benefaction of Sir Walter Gilbey, 1896 . 
Benefaction of the Hausa Association, 1896 
Benefaction of Sir D. L. Salomons, 1899 . 
Sidgwick Lectureship in Moral Science, 1901 



PAGE 

270 
272 



273 
274 

276 

276 

277 

278 

279 

280 



1. 



2. 



5. 



6. 



VI. Scholarships. 

Craven Scholarships, Studentship, and Fund, 1649 . . 283 

1. Scholarship 283 

2. Studentship and Fund 286 

A. Extract from Will of John Baron Craven, 28 May, 

1647 286 

B. Deed of. trust between William Lord Craven and 

certain others, 6 July, 1664. . . . 287 

C. Regulations for the election of the Oxford Scholars, 

approved 26 October, 1649 .... 289 

D. Memorandum of the electors, 2 August, 1681 ; with 

Earl Craven's answer . , . . , 290 

E. Rules for the choice of Lord Craven's Scholars, 

8 December, 1701 291 

F. Statement of proceedings at the election of a 

Scholar, 26 October, 1724 .... 292 

O. Order of the Court of Chancery, 9 March, 1819 . 294 

H. „ „ 22 June, 1841 . 294 

L „ „ 30 November, 1860 294 

Battie Scholarship, 1747 294 

A. Dr Battle's Deed of Gift, '30 September, 1747 . 295 

Rules for the election of the Scholar . 298 

Davies Scholarship, 1810 300 

Bell Scholai-shiiJS, 1810 301 

A. Deed of foundation, 18 July, 1810 .... 302 

B. The seventh regulation, as altered 1812 ... 306 

Pitt Scholarship, 1813 307 

A. Rules for the Pitt Scholarship, 9 December, 1818 . 308 

Tyrwhitt Scholarships, 1817 309 

A. Regulations, approved by Grace 8 April, 1818 . . 311 

B. Augmentation Fund, 1862 818 



Contents 



XV 



PAGE 

7. Crowse Scholarships, 1832 314 

Regulations for the SoholarshipB, 4 December, 1832 . 315 

A. Deed of Tnut, 14 August, 1833 316 

8. Thomas Barnes Scholarship, 1844 319 

A. Regulations, accepted by Grace, 7 February, 1844 320 

B. Deed of Trust, 19 Februaiy, 1844 .... 321 

C. Report of Council of Senate, 24 October, 1867 . 326 

D. Order of Court of Chancery, 29 February, 1868 . 326 

9. Waddington Scholarship, 1870 326 

Deed of foundation, 26 March, 1870 327 

Regulations 328 

10. Lightfoot Scholarships, 1870 329 

Regulations, 24 Noyember, 1870 330 

11. Abbott's Scholarshiiw, 1871 332 

Extract from his Will, 19 February, 1867 .... 332 

A. Regulations for Abbott's Scholarships, 9 February, 1871 334 

12. John Stewart of Raunoch Scholarships, 1884 ... 335 

Extract from Stewart's Will, 7 March, 1881 ... 336 

13. Harkness Scholarships, 1885 337 

Extract from Mrs Pearson's Will, 18 August, 1882 . . 338 

14. aerk Maxwell Scholarship, 1890 340 

Deed of Trust, 4 December, 1890 341 

VII. Memorial Studentships and Memorial 
Funds. 

1. Balfour Memorial, 1883 347 

(a) The Studentship and Fund 347 

(6) The Balfour Library 350 

2. John Lucas Walker Studentship, 1887 .... 350 

3. Prendergast Studentship, 1888 352 

4. Isaac Newton Studentships, 1891 353 

5. Arnold Gerstenberg Studentship, 1892 .... 355 

Deed of Trust, 19 December, 1892 356 

6. Hort Memorial Fund, 1894 358 

Regulations adopted by the Committee of Subscribers, 

6 Februaiy, 1894 359 

Revision Surplus Fund, 18 June, 1896 361 

7. Seeley Memorial Fund, 1897 362 

A. Resolutions adopted by the Subscribers, and Regulations 

for the Seeiey Medal, 17 June, 1897 .... 363 

a Allen Scholarship Fund and AUen Student, 1898 . 364 



xvi Contents 

Vni. Prizes. 

PAOB 

1. Benefaction of the Rev. Thomas Seaton, 1748 ... 369 

Extraot from Beaton's Will, 8 October, 1738 ... 369 

2. Chancellor's Classical Medals, 1751 370 

Regulations aooepted by Grace, 29 April, 1869 ... 873 

3. Members' Prizes, 1762 .373 

4. Townshend Prizes, 1766 375 

5. Anonymous benefaction, 1783, 1784, 1785 379 

6. Benefoction of the Rev. Claudius Buchanan, 1804-6 379 

7. Chancellor's Medal for English Verse, 1811 . . 382 

8. Camden Medal, 1841; Powis Medal, 1867 . .384 

Regulations for Camden Medal, approved 28 April, 1841 . 385 

9. Sir Peregrine Maitland Prize, 1844 386 

10. Muir Prize, 1846 388 

11. Blimey Prize, 1846 390 

A. Deed of Trust, 19 January, 1847 391 

B. Regulations for the prize 392 

12. Adams Prize, 1848 393 

Regulations for the prize, aooepted by Grace, 7 April, 1848 394 

13. Le Bas Prize, 1848 395 

Regulations for the prize, 22 November, 1848 .895 

14. Whewell Moral Philosophy Prizes, 1849 .... 396 

16. Cams Greek Testament Prize, 1853 397 

Augmentation of the fund by Mr Cams, 25 May, 1853 398 

„ „ an anonymous donor, 1894 . 398 

16. Chancellor's Medal for Legal Studies, 1854 ... 398 

17. Scholefield Prize, 1856 400 

Regulations 401 

18. Hare Prize, 1861 .401 

19. Kaye Prize, 1861 402 

20. Sedgwick Prize, 1865 404 

21. Hebrew Prize, 1865 404 

Augmentation by Rev. Joshua Nussey, 1867 . . 405 

22. Winchester Reading Prizes, 1867 406 

23. Evans Prize, 1869 407 

24. Jeremie Prizes, 1870 408 

25. Harness Prize, 1871 409 

26. Yorke Prize, 1875 410 

Codicil to the Will of Mr Yorke, 16 May, 1847. . 410 

Scheme approved by Court of Chancery, 1 June, 1875 . 413 



Contents xvii 

PAGE 

27. Cobden Prize, 1876 414 

28. George Long Prize, 1881 417 

29. Oeoige Williams Prize, 1882 418 

30. Mason Prize for Biblical Hebrew, 1883 .... 418 

31. Prince Consort; Prize, 1883 419 

32. Tbiriwall Prize, 1884 420 

Prince Consort Prize and Thirl wall Prize in common . 421 

33. Marshall Political Economy Prize, 1886 .... 422 
Adam Smith Prize in Economics, 1891 .... 422 

34. Walsingham Medal, 1891 425 

35. Tyson Medal, 1893 427 

36. Bhaonagar Medal, 1893 428 

37. Gedge Prize, 1897 429 

A. Will of Joseph Gedge, 18 Angast, 1869 ... 429 

B. Codicil, 26 March, 1870 431 

Order of the Cotirt of Chancery, 28 liay, 1900 ... 433 

38. Baymond Horton-Smith Prize, 1900 434 

39. Wiltshire Prize, 1900 435 

40. Gladstone Memorial Prize, 1901 436 

IX. Exhibitions. 

1. Skinners' Company 439 

a. Sir James Lancaster 439 

h, Mr Edward Lewis 439 

2. Leather Sellers' Company 439 

3. Viscountess Lumley 441 

4. Christ's Jlospital, Winchester 442 

5. Clothworkers' Company 443 

Marmaduke Levitt Scholarship 443 



X. University Buildings. 



The University Library 

I. Revenue 

a. Benefaction of Tobias Rustat, 1667 

Deed of Trust, 20 November, 1667 
6. Benefaction of William Worts, 1709 
c, „ John Manistre, 1829 

Extract Crooi his Will, 2 April, 1811 



447 

447 

447 
451 
453 
453 
458 



xviii Contents 

PAGE 

II. Site and Buildings 453 

List of sabsoriptions icoeived, 1754-1761 . 455 

CockereU's Building, 1837-1840 .... 456 

Benefaction of Thomas Halford, 1842 . 457 

Deed of Trust, 20 June, 1851 .... 458 

Scott's Building, 1864^1867 . . . , 4ep 

Hancock Building, 1887-1890 .... 460 

Extract from Will of Edw. Grey Hantsook, 4 August, 

1882 461 

Benefaction of Ch. Taylor, D.D., 1889 . 463 

„ Art. Cayley, Sc.D., 1900 . . 463 

III. Benefactions for the purchase of Books . . 463 

a. Bequest of the Reverend John Mainwaring, 

1814 463 

b. Surplus of fund for procuring a bust of 

Hen. Bradshaw, M.A., 1886 ... 464 

c. Bequest of Sam. Sandars, M.A., 1894 . 464 

d. Fund for providing a memorial of Will. Robert- 

son Smith, M.A., 1896 .... 464 

IV. Gifts of Books 465 

2. The Senate House 465 

List of sobscriptioDS, 1719-1734 466 

3. The Printing-House 467 

4. The Botanic Garden 468 

a. Foundation by Richard Walker, D,D„ 1762 . 468 

A. Dr Walker's deed of trust, 25 August, 1762 . 469 

B. Dr Walker's bond to the University, 18 February, 1764 . 473 

b. Benefaction of Charles Viscount May nard. Ill b 475 

A. Office copy of the clause in the Will of Charles Viscount 
Maynard concerning the University of Cambridge, 

13 February, 1775 476 

c. Benefaction of Reverend Edward Betham, 1783 476 

A. Indenture between the University and the Reverend 

Edward Betham, 2 May, 1783 ... 477 

d. Eemoval of the Oardefi to a New Site 479 
Act of ParUament, 1 William IV. Cap. 5 (30 March, 1831) . 480 

Opinion of Counsel (1886) 484 

Further Opinion 485 

6. Appropriation of Site of Old Botanic Garden 

to University^ 1853 485 

5. The Fitzwilliam Museum 486 

A. Extract from the Will of Richard Viscount Fitzwilliam, 

18 August, 1815 487 



ConteffUg xix 

PlOB 

Bequbbts to the Museum 488 

1. Mesman collection of oil-paintings .... 488 

Extract from the Will of Daniel Mesman, 11 March, 

1830 488 

2. Benefaction of Bishop Maltby, 1859. ... 489 

Extract from his Will 489 

3. Benefaction of William Waixi, 1860 .... 489 

Extract from his Will 489 

4. Benefaction of Geo. Crawfurd Heath, M.A. (King's) 490 
6. Collections of Lieut. -Colonel William Martin Leake 490 

Extract from his Will, 17 January, 1859 .490 

6. Benefaction of Rev. Ric. Edw. Kerrich, M.A. (Chr.) 491 

A. Extract from his Will, 3 January, 1868 . 492 

B. Codicil to above Will, 12 November, 1868 493 

7. Benefaction of Dr Arnold 494 

Extract from his Wil], 9 June, 1859 ... 494 

8. Benefaction of Ch. Lesingham Smith, M.A. (Chr.) . 494 

Extract from his Will, 28 December, 1877 494 

9. Benefaction of Samuel Bandars, M.A. (Trin.) . 494 

Extract from his Will 494 

„ a Codicil to the above Will . 495 

Gifts to the Museum (1822-1904) 495 

6. Museums op Classical Archaeology and of General 

AND Local Archaeology and of Ethnology . . 501 

Report of Fitzwilliam Museum . Syndicate on a Museum of 

Greek and Boman Art, 11 March, 1882 ... 502 

The same on Materials for Study in the Museum, 8 March, 

1883 604 

Minute of Council of Cambridge Antiquarian Society, 

18 October, 1883 605 

Museum of General and Local Archaeology and of 

Ethnology 509 

Bequests to the Museum 509 

1. Benefaction of Walter K. Foster, 1891 ... 509 

Extract from a codicil to his Will, 25 April, 1891 609 

2. Benefaction of H. B. Brady, 1891 .... 510 

3. Benefaction of W. Wiles Green, 1891 ... 510 
Gifts to the Museum (1884-1902) 610 

7. The Observatory 511 

1. The Northumberland Telescope, 8 June, 1835 511 

2. The Newall Telescope, 22 May, 1890 .511 



XX ConterUs 

PAGE 

8. Museums and Lecture Rooms for Natural Science . 514 

a. SiU 514 

6. Bntldtngs 514 

Cavendish Laboratory 515 

Letter of his Grace the Chancellor, 10 Oct. 1870 . . 515 

Chemical Laboratory 516 

Departments of Physiology and Human Anatomy 516 

Offer by Hen. Sidgwick, Litt.D., 21 November, 1889 516 

Engineering Laboratory 517 

Offer by Mrs Hopkinson on behalf of herself and her 

family, 13 October, 1898 517 

Medical School 518 

Sedgwick Memorial Museum 518 

Department of Botany 519 

Law School and Squire Library 519 

c. Oifit to the Museums 521 

Department of Anatomy 521 

Benefaction of Professor Flinders Petrie, 1898 . . 521 

Department of Botany 521 

1. Benefaction of John Marty n, 1765 .521 

2. „ Lady Bunbury, 1888 ... 522 

3. „ Cha. Cardalc Babington, 1895 . 623 

4. „ Cha. Packe, M.A. (Oxf.), 1897 . 524 
Department of Chemistry 524 

Benefaction of Tho. Andrews, 1900 .... 524 
Department of Experimental Physics (Cavendish La- 
boratory) 525 

Benefactions of Mr Elphinstone, 1868 ; Mr Talbot, 1903 525 

Department of Geology 526 

List of gifts, 1840-1901 525 

Mechanism and Applied Mechanics .... 526 

List of gifts, 1896-1900 526 

Department of Mineralogy 527 

1. Benefaction of Reverend Will. Whewell, M.A.,. 

1832 527 

2. „ Viscount Alford, 1841 . . 528 

3. „ Cha. Brooke, M.A., 1857 . . 528 

4. „ Howard Warburton Elphinstone, 

M.A., 1858 .... 629 

5. „ Reverend Tho. Wiltshire, M.A., 

1897 529 



Contents xxi 



PAOB 

Department of Zoology 530 

1. Benefaction of Mrs Strickland, 1867; and of 

Miss Strickland, 1874 .... 530 

A. Deed of trust respecting Guratorship of 

Strickland Collection, 13 March, 1874 582 

2. Bequests to the Museum 535 

a. Benefaction of Rob. M^Andrew, F.R.S., 

1873 535 

Extract from the Will of Mr M»Andrew, 

6 December, 1871, with a Codicil . 585 

6. Benefaction of Geo. Rob. Crotch, M.A. 

(Job.) 536 

Extract from the Will of Mr Crotch, 

22 Jane, 1872 686 

c. Benefaction of Miss Jane Saul . . 537 

Extract from the Will of Miss Saul, 

6 December, 1894 .... 537 

d. Benefaction of Tho. Edw. Buckley, B.A. 

(Trin.), 1903 538 

Note of his bequest .... 588 

3. Gifts to the Museum, 1843-1903 ... 538 
The Philosophical Library 541 

Fundamental regulations, accepted 2 June, 1881 . 544 

Letter from the President of the Philosophical Society, 9 May, 

1881 544 

Report of the Council of the Society, 25 April, 1881 . 545 

9. The Divinity School .... . . 545 

1. Benefaction of Reverend Will. Selwyn, D.D. (Job.), 

1864 545 

A. Deed of Trust, 18 December, 1864 . . 547 

2. Benefaction of Rev. Jos. Barber Lightfoot, D.D. 

(Trin.), 1890 548 

3. Benefaction of Sam. Sandars, M.A. (Trin.), 1890 . 549 

List of Statues placed by Mr Sandars in the external 

niches of the School 550 



xxii ConteiUs 



XL Charities. 

1. Bene£Eu:tion of Queen Eleanor, 1290 553 

2. The University CheBts 554 

3. Benefaction of Matth. Stokys, M.A. (King's), 1590 . . 558 

4. Benefaction of Tho. Hobson, 1628 558 

Scheme approved by Charity GommisBionerB, 29 October, 1897 560 

5. Benefaction of John Crane, 1651 565 

a. Relief of sick scholars 566 

6. House for the Regius Professor of Physic 567 

A. Extract from Crane's Will, 26 Jmie, 1651 . 567 

6. Benefaction of the Reverend Hen. Latham, M.A., 1902 . 570 



XII. Miscellanea. 

1. MSS. Collections of Robert Hare, 1590 .... 576 

2. Benefaction of Walter Titley, M.A. 1768 .... 576 

3. The Stanford Dictionary, 1881 577 

4. Marine Biological Association, 1887 579 

5. Collection of Sir Isaac Newton's MSS., presented by the 

Earl of Portsmouth, 1888 581 

6. Other gifts 583 

7. Memorial Statues 586 

8. Memorial Busts 586 

9. Memorial Portraits 587 

10. The Seals 688 

A. The Seal of the University 588 

B. The Seal of the Ghanoellor 589 

11. The Maces 590 

12. The Vice-Chancellor^s Cup .590 



XIII. Finance. 

1. Capitation Tax 595 

2. Endowment Fund 696 



CantentB xxiii 



XIV. Appendix. 

PAGE 

1. Land bought at Nine Wells, Sbelford, and elsewhere, in 

connexion with the New River, 1834 . . . .611 

A. Extracts from Act 4 and 5 Onl. IV. c. 8 (private), 

22 May, 1834 612 

2. Will of Fre. Ja. Quick, 6 March, 1902 .... 614 

3. Bene&ction of Rebecca Flower Squire : augmentation of 

endowment for the Squire Scholarships in Law. . 617 

A. Deed of Trust, 4 March, 1904 617 

The Squire Law Library 619 

B. Deed of Trust, 20 February, 1902 .... 620 

4. Will of Benj. St John Attwood Mathews, 11 May, 1903 624 

5. John Winbolt Prize, 1904 624 

6. Benefaction of the Reverend Vincent Hen. Stanton, D.D. 

(Trin.), 1904 625 



XV. Chronological Summary .... 629 

XVI. Index 649 



I. 



REAL ESTATE, 
TITHE, RENT-CHARGES 



1. Benefaction of King Henrt the Seventh. 
1504. 

In 1504 (20 November) a quadripartite indenture (A) 
¥ras drawn up between the King of the first part ; John Islip, 
abbot of S. Peter of Westminster, and the Prior and Convent 
of the same, of the second part ; the Chancellor, Masters and 
Scholars of the University of Cambridge, of the third part ; 
and the Mayor and Corporation of the City of London, of the 
fourth part : in virtue of which £10 was to be paid yearly at 
Michaelmas by the Abbot, Prior, and Convent of S. Peter at 
Westminster, to the University of Cambridge, in Great S. 
Mary's Church, "to be employed and disposed for the common 
wele of the same University." 

In consideration of this sum, so paid, the University bind 
themselves to hold a service on February 11 in each year, for 
the good estate of the ELing, and for the souls of his late 
Queen, their children, and his &ther the Earl of Richmond, 
his ancestors, and his mother the lady Margaret, Countess of 
Richmond and Derby. 

After the dissolution of monasteries a decree of the Court 
of Augmentations, dated 12 October, 1544 (B), confirmed the 
above grant ; and the Statutes of Elizabeth (1572) directed 
that King Henry the Seventh should be commemorated on 
8 May, when a sermon should be preached by the Regius 
Professor of Divinity \ 

> Comm. Doe. L 481. 

1—2 



4 Benefactian of King Henry the Seventh^ 



A. Deed of Foundation, 20 November, 20 Hen. VII, 1504. 

PartieBto This Indenture quadripartite made betwene the moost cristen 

nant kjng Heniy the Seuenth, by the grace of god kjng of Englond and 

of Fraunce and lord of Irelande, the twenty day of Nouember, the 
twenty yere of his moost noble reigne, of the oon partie : And John 
Islip, Abbot of the monastery of seynt Peter of Westminster, and the 
Priour and Conuent of the same monastery, of the secunde partie : 
And the Chaunoeler Maisters and Scolers of the Yniuersite of 
Cambrigge, on the thirde partie : And the Maire and Commonaltie 
of the Citie of London, on the fourth partie : 
Covenantor Witnesseth that the said Abbot, Priour and Conuent of the said 
WeBtmin- ° monastery of Seynt Peter of Westminster, accordyng to thentent and 
■**'• effecte of Indentures of couenauntes, made betwene the said kyng oure 

soverayne lord, and the same Abbot, Priour and Conuent, beryng date 
the sixtene day of July last paste, and accordyng to the confidence and 
trust that oure said Souerayne lord the kyng hath putte in the same 
Abbot, Priour and Conuent^ and their Successours, truely and effectually 
to execute and perfourme the deuoute.Wyll and myude of oure seid 
Soverayne lord the kyng in that behalf: 
Annual rent Haue geven and graunted, and by these presentes geve and graunte, 
o £10. £1^^ theym and their successours, vnto thp said Chaunceler Maisters 

and Scolers of the said Yniuersite of Cambrigge, and their Successours, 
to the vse of the same Vniuersitie, an annuite or annueU rent of 
ten poundes, to haue and perceyue of the said Abbot^ Priour and 
Conuent, and their Successours, to the said Chaunceler Maisters and 
Scolers, and their Successours yerely for euer While the World shall 
endure, in the fest of seynt Michell tharchaungell or within xxj dayes 
next after euery suche fest, in the church of oure Lady called Seynt 
Mary church, in the said Yniuersite of Cambrigge, to be employed and 
disposed for the common wele of the same Yniuersite. To the whiche 
payment of the said annuite or annuell rent of ten poundes, well and 
truely to be contented and paied yerely While the World shall endure, 
within the dayes and place aboue rehersed, the said Abbot, Priour and 
Conuent bynden the3rm and their Successours vnto the said Chaunceler 
Maisters and Scolers of the said Yniuersite of Cambri^;e, and their 
Successours, by these presentes: 
Fine to be And ouer that the said Abbot, Priour and Conuent couenaunten 

{he^nnnity ^^^ graunten for theym and their Successours, and theym and their 
Successours bynden by these presentes to the said Chaunceler Maisters 
and Scolers of the said Yniversite of Cambrigge, and their Successours, 
That as often as it shall happen the said annuite or annuell rent of 
ten poundes or eny parcell therof to be behynd vnpaied by the space 
of xxj dayes next after eny of the said festes, contrary to the fourme 
and effecte of these Indentures, that then and so often the said Abbot, 



kin 



Deed of Foundation 5 

Priour and Conuent^ and their Suooessoura, shall forfeit, content and 
paye, [and bynd them and their Suooessours to content and paye,]^ 
to the said Chaunoeler, Maisters and Scolera of the eaid Vniyeraite 
of Oambrigge, and their Successours, twenty poundes of laufuU money 
of Englond in the name of a peyne ouer and aboue the said sooune of 
ten poundes: 

And the said Chaunoeler Maisters iwd Scolers oouenaunten and ^^^' 
graunten, for theym and their Successours, and theym and their ^^^|^'*^ 
Successours bynden to the said Maire and Ooounonaltie, and their cbaxvh 
Successours by these presentee, that the same Chaunoeler Maisters ^^ * 
and Scolers and their Successours, shall hold and kepe a solempne 
anniuersarie in the said churche of cure lady, in the said Vniversite 
yerely While the World shall endure, in maner and fourme folowyng ; 
that is to sey, dnryng the lif of the same kyng our Sonerayne lord, in 
the xj day of February, as often as it shall not fisdl vpon eny Sonday. 
And as often as it shall happen to fall vpon eny Sonday in the yere, 
that then and so often the same Chaunoeler Maisters and Scolers, and 
their Successours, shall hold and kepe the same Anniuersarie in the 
Satreday next before euery suche Sonday : All and euery of the same 
Anniuersaries to be holden and kepte for the good and prosperous 
estate of the said kyng oure Souerayne lord duryng his lil^ and for the 
prosperite of this his Realme ; And for the soule of the rig^t excellent 
Pryncesse Elizabeth late Queue of Englond his wlf, and for the soules 
of their children and issue, and for the soules of the right excellent 
Piynce Edmond, late Erie of Richemond, fader to oure said Souerayne 
lord the kyng, and of all the other Progenitours and Anncestours of the 
same kyng our Soverayne Lord, and for the soule of the right excellent 
Pryncesse Margaret Countesse <^ Richmond and Derby, moder to oure 
said Souerayne lord the kyng after hir decease ; And after the decease 
of the said kyng oure Soverayne lord, then and fromthensforth as long 
as the World shall endure, to bold and kepe the said Anniuersarie 
yerely, in the day <^ the yere of the Sepulture of the same kyng oure 
Soverayne lord, without eny other chaonge as often as the same day 
shall not (ah vpon eny Sonday in the yere other than Esterday ; And 
as often as it shall happen to fall vpon eny Sonday in the yere other 
than Esterday, that then and soo often ihe same Chaunoeler Maisters 
and Scolers, and their SucceasourH, shall hold and kepe the same 
Anniuersarie in the Satreday next before euery suche Sonday : And as 
often as it shuki haippea eny oi the same Anniuersaries to be hold and 
kqite vpon any Sherethuiaday, Goodfriday, Ester even, Esterday, or 
Ester monday, then and soo often the same Chaunoeler Maisters and 
Scolers, and their successours, shall hold and kepe the same Anniuenarie 
in the Satreday in the Ester Wdce then next folowyng; And all the 

1 The words within square brackets sie not in the original deed. They 
oeemr in Hare's tnMiseripi (Piqwr eopj in 3 vols., ilL 46. b). 



6 Benefaction of King Henri; the Seventh, 

same Anniueraaries to be holden and kepfce specially and principally 
for the soule of the same kyng oure Souerayne lord, And for the soule 
of the said right excellent Pryncesse Elizabeth, late Queue of Englond 
his Wif, and for the soules of their children and issue, and for the oder 
soules afore rehersed, and all cristen soules, With all suche prayers, 
obseruaunces and ceremonies, in and at euery of the said Anniuersaries 
as hereafter ensueth that is to sey : 



Then follows a particular description of the Services. 



The sum 
paid for the 
serrices to 
be put into 
the Oommon 
ChesL 



If the anni- 
Tersarienfall 
on a day that 
18 already 
occupied, 
they Bliall be 
penormed 
on the next 
day. 



Forfeit for 
non -perfor- 
mance to be 
Iiaid to the 
mayor and 
commonalty 
of London. 



And it is the very myude, will and entent of the said kyng oure 
Souerayne lord, that the said ten poundes yerely which shalbe con- 
tented and paid by the said Abbot, Priour and Conuent of the said 
monastery of seynt Peter of Westminster and their sucoessours in 
fourme aforesaid vnto the said Chaunceler Maisters and Scolers, and 
their Successours, for euery of the said Anniuersaries as is afore 
rehersed, and euery sonmie that shall be forfeited at eny time for 
non-pa3rment therof, shalbe put in the chest of the said Vniuersite, 
and after that be emploied to the oommen profite and vse of the same 
Vniversite : 

Prouided alwey that as often as it shuld happen eny of the said 
Anniuersaries to be holden and kepte on eny day in eny yere that the 
said Chaunceler Maisters and Scolers be bounden to hold and kepe eny 
other solempne Anniuersarie in the same Vniversite, or eny general! 
procession, or in eny day of the oommensementes solempne actes, 
solempne sermones, that then and so often at euery suche tyme onely 
the said Chaunceler Maisters and Scolers, and their Successours, shall 
hold and kepe euery suche Anniuersarie with suche Placeboj Dirige, 
nyue lessons, laudes and masse of Bsquiem^ with the Oracions, prayers, 
obseruances and oerimonies afore rehersed, in the next day that they 
conueniently can or may, without eny further deferryng or dilaye. 

And the said Chaunceler Maisters and Scolers of the said Vniuersite 
couenaunten and graunten, and theym and their Successoiuis bynden 
to the said Maire and Commonaltie of the said Citie of London and 
their Successours by these presentes, that whensoeuer and as often as 
the same Chaunceler Maisters and Scolers of the said Vniveisite dt 
Cambrigge, or their Sucoessours, shall faile and make defaulte in 
kepyng of eny of the said Anniuersaries, that then and so often the 
same Chaunceler Maisters and Scolers of the said Vniversite of 
Cambrigge, and their Successours, shall forfeit, content and pay, 
and bynden theymself and their Sucoessours by these presentee to 
content and pay to the said Maire and Commonaltie, and their 
Successours, for euery such de£Etulte twenty poundes of lauful money 
of Englond: 



Deed of Foundation 



And also whenaoeuer and as often as the same Chaunceler Maisters J^J^?fS 



and Soolers, and their Sucoessours, shall fiiile or omitte at or in eny of of mrUcoiar 

the said Anniuersaries eny particuler thing afore rehersed to be had or 

doon, at or in eny of the same Anniuersaries, that then and so often 

the same Chaunceler Maisters and Scolers, and their Suocessours, shall 

forfeit, content and pay, and bynden theym iwd their Suocessours to 

the said Maire and Gommonaltie, and their Suocessours, by these 

presentes, to content and pay to the same Maire and Gommonaltie and 

their Suocessours for euery suche defftulte, that is to sey, for euery 

particuler thing so omitted and left vndoon contrary to the form, 

maner and ordre aboue rehersed, forty shelynges of laufull money of 

Englond. 

In witnesse wherof to thre parties of these Indentures quadri- now them 
partited of which thre parties oon part remayneth with the said Abbot we 
Priour and Conuent of the said monastery of Seynt Peter of West- 
minster, an other part of the same thre parties remayneth with the 
said Chaunceler Maisters and Scolers of the Vniuersite oi Cambrigge, 
And the thred of the same thre parties remayneth with the said Maire 
and Commonaltie of the said Citie of London, the said kyng cure 
Soverayn lord hath set his great seale. 

And to oon of the same thre parties remaynyng with the said 
Chaunceler Maisters and Scolers of the Vniuersite of Cambrige, The 
said Abbot Priour and Conuent of the said monastery of Seynt Peter 
of Westminster, and also the said Maire and Commonaltie of the said 
Citie of London haue aeuerally set their commen sealer 

And to the other parte of the same thre parties remaynjmg with the 
said Abbot Priour and Ccmuent of the said monasterie oi Seynt Peter 
of Westminster the said Chaunceler Maisters and Soolers of the said 
Vniuersite of Cambrige, and the said Maire and Commonaltie of the 
said Citie of London haue seuerally sett their commen Sealea 

And to the third part of the same thre parties remaynyng with the 
said Maire and Commonaltie of the said Citie of London, the said 
Abbot Priour and Conuent of the said Monasterie of Seynt Petie of 
Westminster and also the said Chaunceler Maisters and Scolers of the 
said Vniuersite of Cambrige haue seuerally set their commen Seales. 

And to the fourth parte of these Indentures remaynyng with the 
said kyng our Souerayne lord the said Abbot Priour and Conuent of 
the said Monastezy of Seynt Peter of Westminster, And also the said 
Chaunceler Maisters and Soolers of the said Vniuersite of Cambrige, 
And in like Wise the said Maire and Commonaltie of the said Citie of 
London haue seuerally set their oommyn seales the day and yere 
abooeseid^ 

1 CoDatedwithtbeotigiiifllintlieBegistiyortlieUiiiferaty, CAofteryete. 

ur. 



8 BefnefOfCtian of King Henry the Seventh 



B. Decree of the Court of Augmentations, 
confirmed 12 October, 1544. 

Heuricus octavus [eic.]. 

Inspezimns inter recorda et irrotulamenta Curie augmentacioniun 
revencionum Corone nostre quoddam decretum per Canccllarium et 
Consilium eiusdem Curie factum in hec verba : 

Memorandum: Forasmoche as it is duly proved afore the Chauu- 
cellour and Counsaill of the Courte of Augmentacions of the Revenues 
of our Soueraign Lorde the kynges Crowne, that the Chauncellor, 
Masters and SooUers of the \a)yuersyte of Cambridge, and their pre- 
decessors, Chauncellors, Masters and Scollers of the same vnjuersjte, 
haue heretofore hadde and contjnuaUy enyoyed one annuyte or annuall 
rente of tenne poimdes sterlynge, yerdy payable and goinge oute of the 
Possessyons of the late monastery of Saynt Peter of Westminster, as 
by an Indenture quadripartyte made betwene the moste noble kynge of 
famous memory Henry the Sevynthe, late kynge of Englonde, on thone 
partye, The Abbott and Convent of the sayd late monastery of 
Saynte Peter of Westminster on the seconde partye, The Chauncellor, 
Masters and Scollers of the sayd Uuyuersyte of Cambrydgo on the 
thirde partye, And the Mayre and Comynaltye of the Cyttye of London 
on the fourthe partye, berynge date the twenty daye of November, in 
the twenty yere of the Reign of the sayd kynge Henry the Seuynthe 
more playnly it maye appere : 

It is therefore orderyd and decreyd by the sayd Chauncellor and 
Counsaill in the terme of Seynt Michaell, that is to saye, the tenthe 
day of October, in the syxe and thyrtye yere of the Reign of our 
Soueraign lorde Henry the eight by the grace of God kynge of 
Englonde, Fraunce and Irelonde, defender of the Faythe, and of the 
Chirche of Englonde and also of Irelonde in earthe the supreme hedde, 
that the sayd Chauncellor, Masters and Scollers of the vnyuersyte 
of Cambridge aforsayd shall haue to them and thcyr Successors, 
Chauncellors, Masters and Scollers of the same vnyuersyte, the sayd 
annuyte or annuall rente of tonne poundos sterlinge. Together with all 
tharroarages thereof due vnto them sythen and from the dyssolucion of 
the sayd late Monastery of Saynt Peters of Westminster hytherto, by 
the handes of the Receyuor of the revenues of thaugmentacions of our 
Soueraigne lorde the kynges Crowne wythin the Countye of Middlesex 
for the tyme beinge of the same revenues remayning in his handes 
att the feaste of Saynt Michaell tharchangell only yerly to be paid 
accordynge to the tenor purporte and efiect of the sayd Indenture. 

Nos autem tenorem decreti predicti ad requisicionem Cancellarii, 
Magistronim et Soholarium Universitatis Cantebrigic predicte duximus 



Rectory of Burwdl 9 

exemplificandum per preeenteB. In cuius rei testimonium has literas 
nostras fieri fecimus patentes. Teste Edwardo North milite apud 
Westmonasterium duodecimo die Octobris anno r^ni nostri tricesimo 
sexto ^. 



2. Rectory op Burwell, Cambridgeshire. 
1544. 

The manor and rectory of Burwell, part of the property 
of the Benedictine House of Ramsey in Huntingdonshire, 
were granted by Henry VIII to Eidward North 4 December, 
1540', and confirmed to him by letters patent 29 January, 
1541* In the same year he was knighted, made treasurer 
of the Court of Augmentations, and elected as one of the 
representatives in parliament for the County of Cambridge. 
In or about 1544 he became Chancellor of the Court of 
Augmentations*. 

In 1544 (4 October) a deed (A) was drawn up between 
him and the University, in virtue of which he engaged, on 
receipt of £600, to procure letters patent from the King, 
with other necessary documents, to enable the said University 
to appropriate the rectory of Burwell S. Mary. North 
further undertook to grant to the University the right of 
sheep-fold, and the advowson of the vicarage, the University 
paying £20 yearly to th^ vicar, and defraying two-thirds of 
the cost of repairing the chancel, and of the pension due to 
the Abbot of Ramsey*. 

The King's Letters Patent (B) dated 28 November, 1544, 
confirm the provisions of North's grant, and further regulate 
the relations of the University to the Vicar and to the 

^ Collated with the original in the Registry of the University, Charters etc. 
167. 

' Deeds of porohases and exchanges, 32 Hen. YUI, Box A. No. 43. Pabl. 
Bee. Office. 

' Lit. Pat. 29 Jan. 32 Hen. YUI (=29 Jan. 1541). 

« See the lives of North in Cooper's Athena, i. 232 ; and Diet, of Nat, 
Biogr, xU. 154. 

* The original is in the Begistry of the University, Box H. i. 1. It is 
printed in Cooper, AntuiU, i. 417. 



10 Rectory of Burwdl, Cambridgeshire, 

Crown. The bishop of Norwich (in whose diocese Burwell 
then was) assented to the transaction 5 December, and the 
archdeacon of Sudbury 6 December next ensuing. There- 
upon Sir Edward North, by a deed dated 20 December, 
acknowledged the receipt of " a certain sum of money " from 
the Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the University of 
Cambridge, acquitted them thereof, and confirmed to them, 
" all that the advowson " etc. of the Rectory of the Church of 
Burwell S*. Mary\ By a second deed, dated on the same 
day, he granted them a right of fold for 200 sheep'. 

There is no evidence that the Senate was consulted on 
this purchase. The only Grace referring to the matter is 
the following, which merely authorises the payment of the 
first instalment of the purchase-money. It was allowed in 
the course of the academical year 1544-46, but is not dated 
more precisely. 

Item yt ys gmunted y^ M'. Vicechancellor do carye vpp and pay to 
Sir Edwarde Northe Chaunceler of thawgmentacions at the delyuerye 
of the kynges lettres or other thynges requysyte acordynge to the 
purporte and effecte of the Indenture now red, the fyrst payments 

The final payment to North was made in March 1545, as 
shewn by his receipt in full, dated March, 1544 (March, 
1544-45) 36 Hen. VIIL* 

In 1646 (11 June) the University bought "the Rectorie, 
Little Parsonage, or Priorye, of Burwell S*^. Andrew... and 
all houses, edifices, buildings, bams, stables orchards gardens 
arable lands meadows pastures [etc] Tenthes and Tithes of 
Come and haie and all manner of tithes of whatsoever 
Nature ... to the said Rectorie ... in aniewise belonging," fcr 
£1026. 13. 4». 



1 North returned the manor of Burwell to the King, 17 May, 37 Hen. YIII 
(=1545). Deeds of purchase and exchange ut supra, Box E. No. 28. 

' Begistry of the University, Box H. i. 4. 

' Grace Book A, fol. 13. 

* Begistiy of the University, Vol. i. 137». The money was borrowed 
from the Chests intended to relieve the neoessities of poor students. 

^ Ibid. Box H. 19. 



Composition with Sir E. North 11 



A. Deed between the University and Sir Edward North, 
4 October, 36 Hen. VIII, 1544. 

This Indenture made the 4th day of Octobre in the zzxyj yere of 
the Beyng of our moete dread souereygn lorde Henry theyght [&o] 
Betwene Sir Edwarde Northe knyght, Chauncelor of our sayde souereygn 
lorde the kyngee Gourte of Augmentacions of the Reuenuee of his 
graces Crowne, on thooe partye : And the Chauncelor, Masters and 
Scholcrs of the uniuersite of Cambrige, one thother partye : Witnesseth, sir B^orth 
That the sayde Sir Edwarde Northe, for the somme of syx hundreth jeeoo. and to 
poundes sterlyng, to be payed in maner and forme as in this present univeraity 
Indenture hereafter shalbe expressed and declared, couenaimteth, and lettm^' 
for hym, his heyers and executors graunteth, to and with the sayd ^^^Qg"' 
Chauncelor, Masters and Scholers, and ther successors, that he the sayd ^^S^%t» 
Sir Edwarde, before the Feaste of the Natyuity of our lorde God next tne^wm. 
ensuyng the date hereof, shall delyuer or cause to be delyuered to the l^rweu 
sayde Chauncelor, Masters and Scholers, or to ther sufi^'cyant depute furthw an° 
our sayde souereign lorde the kynges lettres patentee ynder his great dacUrinffthe 
seale of appropryacion of the parsonage of fiurwell seynt Marie, in the ordioarr^* 
dyoceee of Norwyche* with all and singuler manors, landes, and JJJi^*" 
tenementes. Rentes, Reuersions, and services ; And also all and singuler 
other possessions and heredytamentes, whatsoeuer they be, as well 
spirituall as temporall, to the foresayde parsonage and churcho and 
thappurtenaunces therof in any wyse belonging: to be appropryated 
vnyted and adnexed to the sayd Chauncelor, Masters and Scholers, and 
to their successors, from and immedyatly afber the next aduoydaunce 
of the present Incombent therof by dethe, Cessyon, Resyngnacion or 
otherwise. And also a su%cient Instrument Authenticall, declaryng 
thassent of thordynary, and Archedeacon, and of other hauyng Ryght 
or interest in that behalfe with one suche suer su%cyent and lawfuU 
Release or graunte of the sayde presentacion and Right of patronage of 
the sayde churche of Burwell and his hole tytle, Ryght or interests 
of the same, from the sayde Sir Edwarde Northe, and his heyers, to 
the sayd Chauncelor, Masters and Scholers and their successors. 

And also the sayde Sir Edwarde shall geue, graunte, and release SirEdwmid 
from hym and his heyers, to the sayde Chauncelor, Masters and th/univar- 
Scholers, by his suffycyent dede, one such lybertye of a Folde as the tbMpI^^ 
parsons of Burwell theretofore hath had, and of right ought to have, 
in lyke maner and fmne, as the said lettres patentee of appropnacioni 
thother dedes and instrumentes, and all other the premisses, by the 
councell lemed of the same Chauncelor, Masters and Scholers, shalbe 
deuysed, whereby the sayd Chauncelor, Masters and Scholers^ and ther 

^ Burwell is now in the Diocese of Ely. 



12 Rectory of BurtoeU, Cambridgeshirey 

successors shall or maye haue holde and enioye to them and ther 

successors for euer in propre vse, the sayde parsonage and chirche of 

Burwell, with all and singuler the manors landes and tenementes, 

glebes, tythes, oblacions, obvencions, Frutes, emolumentes and all other 

whatsoever profyttes, comodytes, lybertyee of Folde, and all rentes and 

services, and all other Rights and customes, to the same parsonage in 

any wyse belonging or apperteyning, withowt any maner of presentacion 

induccion or admyssion of any incombent or incombentes in or to the 

sayde parsonage and churche hereafter to be made. 

and the And also that the said Chaunoelor, Masters and Scholers shall haue 

tdvowson of 

theTicarage. graunted by the same lettres patentes, to them and ther successors for 

euer, thaduouson and Right of patronage of the vicarage of the churche 

of Biurwell aforesayde. And also that before the saide Feaste of the 

Natyuyte of our lorde he the sayde Sir Edward, his heyers, or assignes, 

shall dyscharge the sayde |)arsonage and churche of Burwell, and euery 

parte and parcell therof, of all and euery Incombent and Incombentes, 

of all former aduowsons, and all maner of leases, made by the consent 

of the parsone, patrone, and ordynary, and of all other charges and 

arrerages, excepte prozis, synodes, Indemptnytes and pencions, going 

owt of the sayde parsonage, hereafter to be dewe, In suche Wyse, that 

the sayde Chauncelor, Masters and Scholers may then and from 

thensforthe, haue, holde, and enioye the sayde parsonage and chirche, 

and other the premisses to the same parsonage belonging or apper- 

teynyng, and euery parcell therof, to them and ther successors for 

euer, after the next aduoydaunce of the sayde parsonage by dethe 

The Unlver- Resyngnation, or otherwyse, in propre vse and possessyon. And the 

theTicariao sayde Chauncelor, Masters and Scholers couenaunten and graunten for 

*°° ^" them and ther successors, to and with the sayde Sir Edwarde his 

heyers and executors, after suche aduoydaunce, to pay yerly to suche 

vicar of the sayde Churche, and his successors vicars whiche hereafter 

shalbe in the sayde churche of Burwell, one annuell pension or porciou 

of twenty poundes by yere, going owt of the sayde parsonage or Churche 

of Burwell, to the supi)ortacion of the tabyll and housekepyng of the 

sayde vicar and his successors, and of the tenthe or tenthe parte to 

the kynge and his successors hereafter of the sayde vicarage to be 

payde and to the supportation of all other costes and charges ordynarye 

To bear two- and extraordinarye, sauyng the reparation of the chauncell whereof the 

coetof le- Chauncelor, Masters and Scholers and their successors shall here two 

SanoS^and partis of the thre equally to be deuyded, and the Vicar, the thyrde. 

ston^doeto -^"^ ^^ ^Y^^ maner of the pension sometyme due to thabbott of 

S?«Sy ^ Ramsey, whereof the sayd Chaunoelor, Masters and Scholers shall 

yerly pay two partes of the three equally to be deuyded, and the 

vycar for the tyme being, the thyrde. 

CobU to be And it is agreed bytwene the sayde partyes that all the costes and 

equaUy be- charges made and rysing abowt the makyng, wrytyng, and sealyng of 

^S^ all the lettres patentes, instnimentes, and assurances afore rehersed. 



Composition tvith Sir E. Nmih 13 

shall be borne betwene the aayd twoo parties indyferently. In inoondde- 
oonsideracion whereof, the sayde Chauncelor, Masters and Scholers, wUchthe 
couenaunten and graunten for them and ther successors by thes uiidertiiVto 
presentes, to and with the sayde Sir Edwarde his heyers, executors, JS^ofpre- 
and assigues, that they the sayd Chauncelor, Masters and Scholers, ■•»»**Won. 
or ther successors shall make or cause to be made vnto the «ayde 
Sir Edwarde North, his heyers or assignes, at sucbe tyme after suche 
appropriacion had in forme aforesayd, as the sayde Sir EdwaiKie shall 
require the same, at thonly costes and charges of the sayd Sir Edwarde, 
his heyers or assignes, suche good, suer, and suffycyent graunte of the 
presentacion of the vicarage, as by the lemed counsell of the sayd 
Sir Edwarde shalbe deuysed, in maner and forme folowing, and none 
otherwyse. 

That is, that whensoeuer the sayd vicarage shalbe voyde by cession, ^n m avoid- 
Resingnaciou, or otherwise, the sayde Chauncelor, Masters and Scholers, UniTendtT 
within fouer monethes then next and immedyatly folowing, shall elect nate two 
and nominate twoo able and mete persones, clerks, and studentes of the mndTtheir" 
Vniuersity of Cambrige, and the nominacion of those two persones S?North^*' 
shall intimate vnder their common seale to the sayde Sir Edwarde, his jJjSe^^e 
heyers, or assignee ; And the sayde Sir Edwarde his heyers or assignes, Jhinkamoat 
shall haue hill power and aucthorite to present thone of them to suitable, 
thordinary, whosoeuer of them twoo the sayde Sir Edwarde or his 
heyers shall thyncke moste mete and abla 

Provided alwayes, and yt is agreed, that if the sayde Sir Edwarde if be does 
his heyers or assignes, wythiu fouertene dayes next and immedyatly witbin 14 
after the sayde nominacion or eleccion, in writynge vnder seale shewed Univenitj 
and intimate vnto hym or them, do not frely and without making any "*^ ^^ ■°" 
oondycion present one of them, or geve his suffycyent lettres of 
presentacion vnder his seale to thone of them so nominate and elect 
by the Chauncelor, Masters and Scholers, takyng nothyng for the same 
but only syx shyllynges and eyght pence for the wrytyng and sealyng 
of the same presentacion, that then yt shalbe lawfull to the sayde 
Chauncelor, Masters and Scholers, to presente one of those twoo, 
whomesoeuer that they thyncke moste mete, and thinterest of the 
said Sir Edwarde Northe, his heyers and assignes for that tyme fiilly 
to be extyncte and frustrate, any thyng heretofore graunted notwith- 
standing. 

Prouided alwayes, that if thone of these twoo, whome the sayd wiMtiato 
Sir Edwarde, or his assignes doo present, doc refuse to accepte or tiUce case tbe 
the same, that then the sayde Sir Edwarde or his heyers or assignes MnuJP^ 
shall make certyfycat to the sayde Chauncelor, Masters and Scholers of fhoiSd^'^ 
the sayd refusall ; and theruppon the sayde Chauncelor, Masters and '"*•• 
Scholers shall and may nominate efbsoones twoo other to the sayde 
Sir Edwarde and his heyers or assignes, and the sayde Sir Edwarde 
his heyers or assignes, to presente one of them as before. Prouided 
alwayes, that if thone of these twoo, after the seconde nominacion 



14 Rectory of BurweU, Cambridgeshirey 

made by the sajde Chauncelor, Maatera and Scholers, whome the sayde 

Sir Edwarde shall present, doo agayne refuse to acoepte the same ; 

or elles if the sayde Chaimcelor, Masters and Scholers doo not name 

twoo persones, within fouer monethes next after any vacatyon of the 

sayde vicarage, as aforesayde, that then yt shalbe lawfull to the sayde 

Sir Edwarde and his heyers to presente whom the sayde Sir Edwarde 

or his heyers shall thyncke most mete and oonuenyent 

Whramy- And furthermore the sayde Ghamioelor, Masters and Scholers, 

ment ib to i. v 

be made to couenaimten and sraunten for them and ther Successors, that they 

Ml* If Nnrfch 

immedyatly after the dyschaTg3n:ig of the sayde churche vppon the 
present incombent and all other incombentes, and the delyuery of the 
kynges sayde lettres patentee of appropriacion, and thordinary Deane 
and Chapiter of Norwiche and tharchdeacons of Sudbury assent in 
Authentycall wrytyng, to the same impropriacion, shall pay or cause 
to be payed to the sayd Sir Edwarde his heyers or executors the somme 
of three hundreth poundes sterlyng, And within one halfe yere next 
after the date of the said lettres patentee, the somme of three hundreth 
poundes sterlyng, in full recompence and payment of the sayd sonmie 
of syx hundreth poundes sterlyng. 
The tenth And yt is agreed betwene the sayd partyes, that the tenthe now of 

Rinff to be Ryght dewe to our sayd souereygn lorde the kyng and his successors 
tween the for the sayd parsonage of Burwell, extendyng yeriy to the somme of 
Md the^^^ fyue poundes and seuentene pence, shall after the sayd appropriacion 
^i<^* be perpetually payde and borne, in maner and forme folowing : That is 

to saye, the sayd Chauncelor, Masters and Scholers, and their successors 
shall yerly pay, or cause to be payed vnto our sayd souereign lorde the 
kyng his heyers and successors the somme of three poundes and 
seuentene pence sterlyng, for and in the name of the tenthe and tenthe 
parte of the clere yerly value of the sayd parsonage and churche, glebes, 
tythes, oblacions, obuenciona, and other the premisses to the same 
parsonage and churche belonging or apperteyning, ouer and besides 
the value of the sayd pencion of twenty poundes yerly as is aforesayd 
payable to the sayd vicar. And that the said vicar for the tyme being, 
shall in lyke maner pay to our sayd souereign lorde the kyng, his 
heyers and successors yerly the somme of fortye shillynges sterlyng in 
the name of the tenthe and tenthe parte of his sayd pencion of twenty 
poundes by the yere whiche sayd seuerall tenthes of three poundes 
seuentene pence and of fortye shillynges do amounte to the very and 
trewe tenthe and tenthe parte of all the sayde parsonage, church, and 
other the premisses, by our sayd souereygn lorde the kynges lettres 
patentes, as is aforesayde, to be impropried vnto the sayde Chauncelor, 
Masters and Scholers and to ther successors. And whereof our sayde 
souereign lorde is at this present tyme answered, as of the juste tenthe 
of the sayde parsonage and other the premisses as by the R&ootde 
therof in the kynges courte of tenthes and f^rste frutes more playnly 
appereth. 



Letters patent of Heiirij VIII 15 

In witnesse whereof the partyee aboue wretyn to these presentes 
haue interchaungeably sette ther sealis, the day and yere aboue 
wretyn*. 



B. Letters patent of King Henry VIII, 28 Nov. 1544, 
Rot PaL 36 Hen. 8, p. 2. 

HenricuB octavus [etc.]. 

Sciatis quod no6...ad honorem dei, augmentum virtutiB, et incre- Leave riven 
mentum bonarum literarum in vniversitate nostra Cantebrig',...damus North to 
et per presentes coucedimus dilecto Consiliario nostro Edwardo North the iJniver- 
militi Cancellario nostro Curie nostre augmentationum revencionum fdvowson of 
Corone nostre, quod ipse advocacionem, presentacionem liberam dis- ^^j^^ 
posicionem et ius patronatus eoclesie parochialis de Burwell sancte g["j^ 
Marie in Comitatu nostro Cantebrigg' et in dioces' Norwicen' dare, 
concedere, et relaxare possit Cancellario Magistris et scholaribus vniver- 
sitatis ville nostre Cantebriggie... tenendum de dicto Edwardo North... 
in puram et perpetuam elemosinam ; et eisdem Cancellario, magistris, 
et scholaribus quod ipsi sub nomine Cancellarii, Magistrorum et 
Bcholarium vniversitatis nostre Cantebriggie advocacionem et ius and to the 
patronatus predict' a prefato Edwardo recipere et tenere [possint] eis to receiTe it 
et sucoessoribus suis imperpetuum dedimuM ; et similiter licentiam standinff 
specialem damns per presentes aliquo statute de terris et tenementis °*<>'^°^^°- 
ad maniim mortuam non ponendis edito, aut aliqua alia re causa 
vel materia quacunque in aliquo non obstante. Et hoc absque brevi 
nostro ad quod dampnum, aut aliqua inquisicione virtute alicuius talis 
brevis vel alitor prosequend' faciend' aut retoumand' licet predicta 
advocatio de nobis quovismodo teneatur in capite vel alitor. 

Volumus etiam quod idem Cancellarius, Magistri et scholares Theca>»noei- 
vniversitatis nostre Cantrebrigg* per nomen Cancellarii magistrorum aodSchoUn 
et scholarium vniversitatis nostre Cantebr' sint vnum corpus nomine ^^ied w»^ 
et re, et quod sint persone habiles et capaces ad perquirend' et ^^Sm^a^ 
reoipiend' sibi et sucoessoribus suis...dictam rectoriam de BurweU, ^ij^'jf 
ac omnia et singula maneria, terras, et tenementa, redditus, reuerciones ^^^^ 
et hereditamenta quecunque tam spiritualia quam temporalia predicte aaidrec^ry; 

. . 1 . J. X X • 1- J • 11 . ^ X of pleading 

rectone ecclesie predicte, et omnia aha decimas, oblaciones, fructus, and being 
iura, et emolumenta quecunque ad dictam rectoriam de Burwell quo- et& 
vismodo pertinen' sine spectan'. Et quod per idem nomen et sub eo 
nomine possint prosequi et clamare, placitare et implacitari, defendere 
et defendi, respondere et responderi, in quibuscunque Curiis et locis 
regni noetri, ac dominiorum, iurisdictionum et potestatum nostrorum 
quorumcimque ac heredum et successorum nostrorum, in et super 

' From the original in the Begistiy of the University, Box H. 1. It is 
printed in Cooper, AntiaU, i. 417. 



16 Rectot*y of Burwdl, Cambridgeshire, 

omnibus et singulis, causis, aocionibus, sectis, brevibus, demaundis et 
quei^lis realibus personalibus et mixtis tarn temporalibus quam 
spiritualibus, et in omnibus aliis rebus causis et materiis quibuscunque 
*dictam rectoriam et cetera premisaa seu aliquam inde parcellam con- 
cernentibus siue tangentibus. 
The Rectory Sciatis insuper quod nos de vberiori gratia nostra... ac authoritate 
printed to nostra regia suprema ecclesiastica qua fungimur, ad humilem supplica- 
Unlvenity. cionem predicti Edwardi North Consiliarii nostri veri et indubitati 
patroni dicte ecclesie siue rectorie de Burwell sancte Marie predict' 
vnacum espresso consensu Willelmi episcopi Norwioensis ordinarii et 
omnium aliorum quorum interest in bac parte obtent* seu obtinend' 
dictam ecclesiam siue Rectoriam de Burwell per oessionem siue liberam 
resignacionem Willelmi Devonishe nuper Rectoris eiusdem nunc 
vacantem ac omnia et singula maneria terras et tenementa redditus 
reuersiones, et servicia, necnon omnia et singula alia possessiones et 
bereditamenta quecunque tam spiritualia quam temporalia, predicte 
rectorie et ecclesie predicte quovismodo pertinen' siue spectan', vel 
eiusdem rectorie parcell' vnacum omnibus et singulis decimis fructibus 
emolumentis Curie libertatibus faldagiis oblacionibus, iuribus et omnibus 
et singulis ac aliis suis pertinen' et commoditatibus eidem rectorie, 
seu alicui paroelle eiusdem, pertinen' siue spectan' statim post dona- 
cionem, concessionem siue resignacionem advocacionis, presentacionis, 
siue libere disposicionis et iuris patronatus ecclesie predicte predictis 
Cancellario magistris et scholaribus a dicto Edwardo North fact' 
dictis Cancellario magistris et scholaribus et successoribus suis, et 
vniversitati predicte appropriavimus, consolidavimus, vnivimus, et 
incorporavimus et appropriamus, consolidamus annectimus vnimus et 
incorporamus per presentes. Habend' tenend' et gaudend' prefatam 
rectoriam vnacum omnibus et singulis premissis prefato Cancellario, 
Magistris et scholaribus et successoribus suis in proprios sues vsus in 
liberam et puram elemosinam imperpetuum. Et absque aliqua prose- 
cucione induccione siue admissione alicuius Incumbentis vel aliquorum 
incumbentium ad rectoriam predictam imposterum fiend'. Et quod 
bene liceat et licebit eisdem Cancellario, magistris, et scholaribus vel 
eorum successoribus per se vel per certos attomatos siue procuratores 
suos in realem, actualem, et corporalem possessionem dicte rectorie 
et omnium et singulorum premissorum ingredi et recipere, ac eandem 
possessionem et omnia et singula premissa sic ingressa et recepta 
libere pacifice et quiete sibi et successoribus suis vt predicitur imper- 
petuum retinere absque licentia vlla episcopi Norwioensis seu eiusdem 
loci Archidiaconi nunc aut imposterum obtinend' et absque hesitacione, 
aut contradiccione cuiuscumque. Et hoc absque brevi nostro de ad 
quod dampnum aut aliqua inquisicione virtute alicuius talis brevis vel 
alitor prosequend', faciend' aut retoumand'. Aliquo statute de terris 
et tenementis ad manum mortuam non ponend' edito, Aut aliqua alia 
re, causa vel materia quacunque in aliquo non obstante. 



Letters patent of Henry VIII 17 

£t vlterius yolumus, ac auctoritate nostra predicta pro nobis here- ^e aaid 

dibua et sucoessoribus noetris per presentee concedimus, quod super to p^n/a 

appropriacione rectorie et ecclesie predicte et cum primum possessionem clerk to be 

dicte rectorie racione harum literarum patentium dicti Cancellarius ^^^' 

Magistri et scholares adepti sint, Cancellarius, nu^gistri, et scholares 

predicti eorumque suocessores, vnum clericum habilem et idoneum loci 

illius ordinario et dioceeano nominabunt, et presentabunt. Qui quidem 

sic nominatus et presentatus, ac per dictum ordinarium canonice 

institutus et inductus nominabitur et erit vicarius perpetuus dicte 

ecclesie de Burwell Sancte Marie et ita de tempore in tempus imper- 

petuum, quotiescunque eandem vicariam perpetuam aliquo modo 

deinceps vacare contigerit. Qui quidem vicarius eiusque successores ^^*f*?. 

loco rectoris erit, residentiam inibi faciet, hospitalitatem fovebit, et rector's 

, .1.1 . A . place, have 

curam ammarum parochionorum ibidem geret, et cetera omnia faciet cure of souls 
et exequetur que ad offidum Rectoris ibidem antea pertinuisse, seu in ®^ 
futuro pertinere dinoscuntur. Et omnia onera ordinaria et extraordi- 
naria ad dictam ecclesiam pertinentia agnoscet et supportabit preter- 
quam in reparacione Cancelli quotiens opus fuerit, et penciones annue 
quadraginta solidorum olim debite Abbati de Ramsey, quorum quidem 
tam pencionis quam reparacionis dictas duas tertias partes, dictos 
Cancellarium magistros et scholares, ac vnam et reliquam partem 
vicarium et eius successores solvere ordinavimus et supportare. 

Volumus iusuper quod dicti Cancellarius magistri et scholares A suitable 
provideant seu provider! faciant vnam mansionem sive domum hones- be provided, 
tam, et competentem, que quidem doinus sine mansio ad dictum 
vicarium et suos successores imperpetuum pertinebit ad inhabi- 
tandum. 

Ordinamus preterea quod predicti Cancellarius magistri et scholares. Money to be 

et successores sui singulis futuris annis distribuant seu distribui faciant poor. 

inter pauperes dicte ecclesie de Burwell parochianos quandam rationa- 

bilem pecunie summam de fructibus dicte ecclesie provenientem, et 

vsque ad summam tresdecim solidorum et sex denariorum exten- 

dentem per episcopum et loci illius diocesanum limitandam et assig- 

nandam. 

Volumus etiam quod idem vicarius et successores sui per nomen J^«^*^*® 
* '^ be capable 

vicarii de Burwell sint persons habiles et capaces ad recipiendum et of holding 

. ., . .1 .... . lands, plead- 

perquirendum sibi et successonbus suis vicanis quecunque terras, inland 

tenementa, et hereditamenta in Burwell predicta pro vicaria sua inibi piealed, etc. 

dotanda ; et per idem nomen et sub eo nomine prosequi clamare et 

placitare, et implacitari defendere et defendi, respondere et responderi 

in quibuscunque curiis et locis regni nostri ac dominiorum, iurisdic- 

tionum,et potestatum nostrorum quorumcuaque ac heredum et succes- 

sorum nostrorum in et super omnibus et singulis causis, accionibus, 

sectis, brevibus, demaundis et querelis realibus, personalibus et mixtis, 

tam temporalibus quam spin'tualibus et in omnibus aliis rebus, causis 

et materiis quibuscunque. 

a 2 



18 Rectory of Buru>eU, Cambridgeshire 



The Ticur to 
receive an 
annual sti- 
pend of £20. 



Duet to be 

Bid to the 
ng. 



The Unlver- 
sltTtobe 
reueved 
from the 
payment of 
flnt fruits. 



Volumus etiam quod dicti Oancellariiis, magistri et scholares super 
dicte rectorie et ecclesie appropriacione, aut quamprimum eiusdem 
reciorie liberam et pacificam posaessionera ita vt predicitur adept! sint, 
vicarium inibi futurum et Buooessores buos dotent cum congrua con- 
venienti et racionabili porcione sive petione pro victu et Bustentacione 
eiuadem vicarii et Bucoessorum Buorum et pro omnibuH aliia oneribus et 
sumptibuB eidem vicarie incumbentibus supportandiB et manuteDendis, 
videlicet cum annual i pencione Biue porcione extendenti ad summam 
viginti librarum per annum. Statuto de terriB et tenementiB ad manum 
mortuam non ponendis, aut aliqua alia re, camsa, vel materia quacunque 
in aliquo non obstante. 

Et vlterius, volumus per preseutes quod vicarius ecclesie predicte 
pro tempore existens et successores sui vicarii post mortem dicti 
modemi rectoris ecclesie seu a tempore quo eadem ecclesia vt prefertur 
quoquo modo vacare contigerit solvant seu solvi faciant nobis heredibus 
et successoribus nostris annuatim extimc et deinceps imperpetuum pro 
decimis et nomine decime partis vicarie predicte et pencionis siue 
porcionis vicarii predicti quadraginta solidoa Et quod dicti vicarius 
et successores sui imperpetuum onerentiu: cum primiciis et prim is 
fructibus dicte vicarie nobis, heredibus, et successoribus nostris re- 
spondend' secimdum ratam et proporcionem dotacionis eiusdem vicarie 
ac formam et effectum statuti in hoc casu editi et provisi. Et quod 
predicti Cancellarius magistri et scholares et successores sui post 
mortem eiusdem modemi rectoris ecclesie predicte seu a tempore quo 
eadem ecclesia vt prefertur quoquo modo vacare contigerit solvant seu 
solvi faciant nobis heredibus et successoribus nostris annuatim ex 
nunc et deinceps imperi)etuum pro decimis ac nomine decime partis 
rectorie ecclesie predicte tres libras et septemdecem denarios l^alis 
monete Anglie ad curiam nostram primorum fructumn siue primiciarum, 
et decimarum nostrarum singulis annis solvend', colligend' per epis- 
copum Norwicensem vel alios ad hoc deputand', \i^ in statute de ea re 
nuper edit' plenius apparet pro omnibus aliis decimis siue decima parte 
quacumque proinde nobis heredibus vel successoribus nostris quoquo 
modo reddend^ vel soluend'. Que quidem separales summe quadraginta 
solidonun et trium librarum et septemdecem denariorum inter se 
attingunt et extendunt ad veram decimam sive decimam partem 
Rectorie predicte, et vnde ad presens pro decima siue decima parte 
eiusdem rectorie respondemus. 

Ac etiam quod dicti Cancellarius magistri et schdares et succeesores 
sui imperpetuum penitus exonerentur et acquietentur de primiciis et 
primis fructibuB, ac de quibuscunque denariorum siuumis pro primis 
fructibus, revencionibus et proficuis, aut nomine primorum fructuimi, 
revencionum et proficuorum dicte rectorie et ceterorum singulorum 
premissorum eis vt prefertur appropriat' seu -appropriand', ac nobis 
virtute seu racione cuiusdem actus parlianienti in anno regni nostri 
vicesimosexto editi debit' seu imposterum debend'.... Sal vis semper epis- 



Benefaction of John Mere 19 

oopalibas et archidiaconalibus iuribus quibuscunque per vicarios ante- 
dictos de Burwell et einB saoceasores support' et subeiind', a quibus 
dictum Cancellariuia magistros et scholares liberos et exoneratos esse 
volumua per presentes. 

Et preterea volumus ac per presentes mandamus tarn Cancellario ^^ . 
noetro Anglie quam clerico hanaperii Cancellarie nostre aut eius bedeiirered 
deputat' ibidem quod ipsi deliberabunt seu deliberari facient dictis or fine. 
Cancellario magistris et scholaribus dicte vniversitatis ville nostre 
Cantebr' has literas nostras patentee sub magno sigillo nostre Anglie 
debito modo factas et sigillatas absque fine seu feodo mi^o vel parvo 
nobis in hanaperio nostro seu alibi ad vsum nostrum quoquo i^odo 
reddend' solvend' vel faciend^ £o quod expressa mentio etc. 

In cuius rei testimonium has literas nostras fieri fecimus paten tes. 
Teste meipso apud Westmonasterium xxviij** die Novembris anno 
regni nostri tricesimo sexto. Per breve de privato sigillo et de data 
predicta^. 



3. Benefaction of John Mere. 
1558-59. 

John Mere, of King's College, proceeded B.A. 1526, M.A. 
1529. In 1544 he became a member of Corpus Christi 
College. He was one of the Esquire Bedells, and Registrary 
bom 1543 to 1558, in which year he died (13 April). 

By will, dated a few days before his death, he bequeathed 
to the University two houses in the parish of S. Benedict, 
together with the unexpired term of years in the lease of a 
garden opposite to the said houses. 

On the first day of March, 1558-59, a deed was drawn up 
between the University and Mere's executors, in virtue of 
which it was agreed that in consideration of what Mere had 
done the Vice-Chancellor should preach, or cause to be 
preached, a sermon annually in S. Benedict's Church on the 
Wednesday in Easter Week, in which the diligent reading of 
scripture should be enjoined, and the duty of obedience 
should be specially enforced. After the sermon certain 
payments were to be made, and alms were to be given to 
the poor. The deed is as follows: 

1 From a copy made by Bob. Hare (MSB. Hare, ill. 91—95). The 
origiiial is in the Registry of the University, Charien, etc. 186, but seriously 
injured by damp. 

2—2 



20 Benefaction of John Mere 

Sedeed!' '^^ Indenture made the first daye of Marche in the first yere of 

the reigne of our soveraigne Ladye Elyzabeth bye the grace of god 

Queue of England [eta] betwixt William Cecyll Knight chancellour of 

th' vniuersitie of Cambridge and the maisters and achollers of the same 

on th' one partye : and Thomas Wilson bachilour of diuinitie and John 

Ebden master of Arte exeoutours of the testament of John Mere 

esquyer late on of the bedilles of the said vniuersitie on the other 

partye, witnessithe 

John Mwe "pi^alj where the said John Mere of his good and meere benevolenoe 

i'^ Ba^' ^^^^"^ ^® ^^ vniuersitie haue gyven to vs the said Chancellour [etc] 

ptfieh his two tenementes where he dwelt situate in the parishe of S. Benettes 

in Cambridge aforesaid betwixt a tenement callyd the Crosse Keyes on 

the west parte, and a tenement belonging to Corpus Christi Colledge 

on the east syde, the southe head abutting vpon the streate leading in 

to the markett toward the east, and the northe head abutting vpon the 

Whit horse 

SfiwJt in -^^^ *^® haxLe gyyen therwith the terme of yeares which he hath 

»ij«ehoid in certen garden growndes with the howsyes and chambers theron 

buylded holden by Indenture of John Hatcher doctor in phisike, late 

parcell of the Fryers Augustynes lying over against his said ij 

tenementes 

s?rmon to ^^ consideracion wherof we the said Chancellour [etc] for vs and 

S ^iSe^^ ^^^ successours doo covenant and grant to and with the said Thomas 

dianoeUor. and John executours aforesaid for the testificacion of our kind accepta- 

cion and myndfull remembrance of the said gifte and benevolenoe of 

the said John Mere that the vice-chancellour for the tyme being shall 

preache or cause to be preched one englishe sermon yerelye with in 

the churche of S. Benettes ever vpon the Wedensdaye in the weeke of 

Easter, to be ronge ther vnto at ix of the clocke bye the bellman of th' 

vniuersitie, which shall the daye before also signifye the same with his 

bell thoroughe the towne as the manner ys. 

be trStedin ^^^ ^^*^ ^^® ^^ precher shall haue for his paynes iij". iiij*. who 

the Sennon. jn ^is sermon shall in parte or in the hoole spend his matter either in 

exciting the auditorye to the diligent and reverent hearing and reding 

of the scripture, either in teaching due obedyence of the subiectes to 

their princyes and of pupilles to their tutours, of servauntes to their 

maisters, with some Lesson for magistrates maisters and tutours for 

the well ordering of their subiectes servantes and pupiUes, either to 

exhorte them to the releaving of the poore, in teaching agayn the poore 

their dutye in their behavioiu", either shall exhorte them to the daylye 

preparation of deathe and not to feare death otherwise then scripture 

doth allowe 

given to the ^^ which sermon the vioechancelloiu" not making the sermon to 

haue vj*., the ij proctours either of them iiij^., the ij taxers either of 

them iiijd., the orator iiij*., the ij scrutatours either of them iiij<»., the 

curate of the churche iiij^., the iiij bedilles etche of them iiij*., the bell 



preadier 



Gift of University Street 21 

ringer iiij<^., the parishe clarke ij'., the Gastell Tolbothe and spittle andothen, 
howse iij*. at the discretion of the vioechancellour or in his absence of 
the chaplejn of the yniuersitie for the tyme being, which chapleyn for 
his paynes in recejving the yerelye rent and making yerelye distribution 
as aforesaid, making also his accownt with other suche tenementes 
belonging to th' vniuersitie, shall haue ij*. yerelye. 

And if it so chanse that the vicechanoellour and other officers afore and in 
namyd be not present, then his and their portions to be bestowyd the to the poor, 
more larglye vpon the poore by the discretion of the vioechancellour or 
in his absence the chapleyn aforesaid. 

And Further we the said Chancellour maisters and schollers for vs what is to 
and our successours do grant and covenaunt to and with the said u^e Sermon 
executours for ever, that in default of vs and our successours if the ^^^ed 
sermon aforesaid with the said yerelye distributions be not yerelye ^^n^^^^t 
from tyme to tyme performed ever on the wedensdaye in £aster weeke di»tribated. 
aforesaid or elles within the holydayes of the said Easter weeke, that 
then it shall be lefull (tic) to the churchewardens of the said parishe 
for the tyme being, to enter in to the said two tenementes and their to 
distrayn, and the distresse so taken to sell to the leaveing of x*. in the 
name of a payn which x*. they shall immediatlye distribute to the 
Castell Tolbothe and other poore at their discretion, and if the tenant 
for the tyme being will either for redemyng the distresse or elles will 
disburse the said x'., that then the said tenant shall be allowyd at his 
next paye without difficultie and without eny dammage or hurt to the 
said tenant for his interest of yeres and dwelling whatsoever. 

In witnes wherof we the said chauncellour maisters and schollers 
in our full congregacion haue put to our scale to the one Indenture 
remaynyng withe the saide executours and after their departure 
remayning emongest the monumentes of Corpus Christi CoUedge in 
Cambridge, and we the said Thomas and John haue put to our sealys 
to the other Indenture remaynyng within the commen hutche of th* 
vniuersitie aforesaid the daye and yere aboue written^. 



4. Archbishop Parker's gift of University Street. 

1574. 

In 1574 (6 August) Archbishop Parker conveyed to the 
University the ground which he had bought, partly from 
King's College, partly from Corpus Christi College, in order 
to provide a new street leading directly from the Schools to 
Great S. Mary's Church. He "called this thoroughfare 
University Street, bijt the usual perversity of the public 
changed the name to Regent Walk*." 

^ From the original in the Registry of the University, Box B, No. 24. 

« ArcK Hut, iil 39. 



22 Gift of University Street 

In virtue of the deed printed below, the Archbishop 
grants his own ground to the University, and Corpus Christi 
College that portion of it which he had bought from them. 
Further, the College undertakes to keep in repair not only 
the street and boundary walls, but also the books which the 
Archbishop had given to the University Library; and they 
submit themselves to a fine in the case of non-performance of 
those duties. 

This Indenture tripertite made the sixth dale of August in the 
sixtenth jeare of the Reigne of our moste gracious sovereigne Ladie 
Elizabeth by the grace of god Quene of England [etc]. 

Betweue the most reverende Father in Gkxl Matthew by godes 

providence Archebisshopp of Canterburie primate of all England and 

Metropolitane on the one partie; And the Chauncelour maister and 

schollers of the Universitie of Cambridge on the seconde partie ; And 

Roberte Norgate clerk Maister or keper of the College of Corpus Christi 

and of blessed Marye in Cambridge and the fellowes or schollers of the 

same Colledge commonly called Bennett Colledge of the thirde parte, 

Wytnesseth : 

Abp. Parker That the saide moste reverende father hathe given and graunted 

UniverBity and by theis presentes dothe give and graunte to the saide Chauncelor 

in'ifnfve"- MaistoT and schollers of the said Universitie and to their successors 

wUch^hT' for ever all that his grounde lyinge in the newe made streate now 

boughUrom caH^^ tho Universitie streate whiche he the said most reverende father 

^g'8 Col- late purchased of the Provost and Fellowes of the Kynges Colledge in 

Cambridge aforesaida 
Also Corpus And further wytnesseth that where the saide Roberte Norgate 
legeKrantfl maister of the saide colledge of Corpus Christi and of blessed Marie 
versity their and the Fellowes or schollers of the same CoUedge have received and 
Sie ume'^ hadd aforehande of the said moste reverende Father Matthew Arche- 
th^Abp?h»d hisshopp of Canterbury a certeyn summ of good and lawfull monney of 
ttern^^^' Englande, whereof by theis presentes they...doo acknowledge them- 
selves well and truely contented and paida In consideration whereof 
the said Maister and Fellowes or schollers of Corpus Christi Colledge 
and of Blessed Marie aforesaid have given and granted, and by these 
presentes for them and their successors doo give and graimt to the said 
Chauncelour Maister and Schollers of the Universitye of Cambridge... 
all and everie their parcell of grounde beinge and lyinge in the said 
Theatreet streate called the Universitie Streate... partely betwene the twoo brick 
walles in the parishe of greate Sainte Maries nighe the Markett place, 
and partely betwene their newe buyldinges there, the east hedd 
abuttinge on the kinges highe waie there the breadth whereof at that 
ende is twentie fewer foote, twoo ynches, and so in lenght from the east 
to the west hedd abuttinge uppon the schole lane, eight score seveutene 
foote and throe ynches, the breadth wherof at the said west hedd 



described. 



by Archbishop Parker 23 

betewene the brick wall on the northe, and the brick wall on the south 
is twentie eight foote one ynche and half an ynche with all and singuler 
poetes and railes conteyned therein. 

Whiche said Universitie streate the said Maister fellowes or schoUers This street 
for them and their successors doo covenante and graunte to and withe arr-waiis 
the said Chaunceloure Maister and schoUers and their successors for take to keep 
ever well and sufficientlie to mayneteyne and kepe in good reparations *" "i*^- 
with all manner of stone sande and workemanshippe at their propre 
costes and charges, at the monicion of the Vice-Chatmceloure for the 
time beinge, and in like manner from tjme to tjme to repaire the 
brick walles with the like copinge of the same walles as well those that 
stand of bothe sides of the saide Universitie streate, as those that 
stande right over against the Universitie schooles on bothe sides of the 
schole gate there. 

And also shall from tyme to tyme repaire and mayneteyne all suche ^jyiSf ***' 
books as the said most reverende father hath alreadie given or shall to keep in 
hereafter give to the Universitie Librarie there, with elapses and boc^to? 
byndinge necessarie and convenient, whiche saide bookes are or be to be SSeirchains, 
placed at the north ende of the saide Universitie Librarie in certen J^hS^* 
lockers appointed for the same And shall also maynteyne and repaire ^^^[i? **** 
the chaines of so many of the same bookes as be alreadie chained there. 

And the said Maister and Fellowes or schoUers doo covenant and Fineto be 
graunte for them and their successors to and with the saide reverend oTnon^ 
father and his successors, and to and with the saide Chaunoeilor SfthoiS*"** 
Maister and schoUers of the Universitie of Cambridge and their **"""• 
successors that as often as they the saide Maister feUowes or schoUers 
of Corpus Christi College aforesaide and their successors shaU fail in 
repayring the said Universitie Streate the waUes and copinge of the 
same as is abovesaide, and in repaireinge and amending of the said 
bookes as before is expressed and given to the said Universitie Librarie 
within fortie daies after monition given to them by the Chauncellor 
or Vice-ChaunceUor of the saide Universitie for the tyme being shall 
for everie moneth after suche monition the premises not being repaired, 
forfeyte and j)aie in the name of a paine for every weeke to the saide 
ChaunceUor Maister and SchoUers of the said Universitie and their 
successors three shiUinges and fower pence. 

And furthermore the saide moste reverende father Matthew Arche- The residue 
bissbopp of Canterburie hath given and graunted to the said Maister nound 
FeUowes and SchoUers of Corpus Christi CoUedge and blessed Marie in thelto. ^ 
Cambridge and their successors for ever the residue of aU the saide ^££*J^' 
grounde lately purchased of the saide Provost and Fellowes of the fJ'^^I^J*"* 
Kinges CoUedge as by his Indentures quadripertite thereof made bearing ^^^ 
the date of theis presentes more plainlie male appere. In witnes 
whereof to every parte of theis presentes the parties abovesaid have 
putt theire seales the daye and yeare above wrytten^. 

^ From the original in the Begistry of the UniTersity, Box B. 



Ck>Uege. 



24 Barton, Sturbridge Chapel 

5. Estate at Barton, Cambridgeshire. 
1681. 

In 1681 the Univereity bought of Devereux Martin, 
Esquire, of Barton, for £1516, an estate described in the 
conveyance, dated 31 May, as "the manor and lordship of 
Barton alias Barton-Burwych alias Warde"^ 

6. Hospital of S. Mary Magdalene, Sturbridge. 

1817. 

The small Norman church stcuiding eastward of the site 
on which Sturbridge Fair used to be held, and known as the 
Hospital of S. Mary Magdalene, Sturbridge, or, more briefly, 
Sturbridge Chapel, was bought by the Reverend Thomas 
Kerrich, M.A., Fellow of Magdalene College, and principal 
librarian of the University (1797-1828), from Frederick 
Markby, Esquire, for £160, 19 January, 1816". The condition 
of the building had attracted attention during the previous 
year, for the following Grace passed the Senate 24 October, 
1815: 

Cum nonnuUis m hac Academia bene visum fuerit pecunias quasdam 
conferre ne vetustiasima iUa qu» m agro BamweUiauo sita est cades 
funditus eruatur: 

Plaoeat vobis ut summa qiunquaginta librarum ex cista communi in 
eundem usum erogetur, sintque Doctores Procter et Clarke et Magister 
Kerrich Syndici vestri constituti qui accepti et expensi vobis rationem 
reddant^. 

The total amount subscribed, including £30 from Mr 
Kerrich himself, was £174. 

In the deed dated 29 May 1817, by which Mr Kerrich 
conveyed the building to the University, it is described as : 

^ All the doonments relating to the pnrohaae and histoiy of the estate 
are in the Begistrj of the UniYersity, Box P. 

> The conveyance is in the Begistty of the Uniyersity, Box Q. For the 
history of the building see Blomefield's CoUectanea Cantahrigiensiat 1751, 
p. 171; and Cooper's Memorialt, iii. 287. 

» Grace-Book M, p. 169. 



Site of Downing College 26 

All that building called the Chapd House situate in Stouibridge 
alias Stirbridge Fair Field next Paper Mills Turnpike facing the 
turnpike road there on the South containing in length 57 feet on the 
North 57 feet the West end 22 feet and the East End 18 feet heretofore 
in the occupation of John HiUson with a baulk or piece of ground 
adjoining to and lying round the said House containing in width 
three feet and a half or thereabouts and the pathway leading from the 
turnpike road together with all and singular Eaves Drips Gates Stiles 
Fences Ways Watercourses Paths Passages Rights Privileges and 
Appurtenances whatsoever to the said building and premises belonging 
or in any wise appertaining. 

At the end of the deed the following proviso occurs : 

And the said Chancellor Masters and Scholars for themselves and 
their Successors do hereby covenant promise and agree to and with the 
said Tho*. Kerrich his heirs and assigns in manner following (that is 
to say) that they the said Chancellor Masters and Scholars and their 
Successors shall not nor will at any time hereafter pull down or remove 
or cause or suffer to be pulled down or removed or fall into decay the 
said building hereby conveyed or intended so to be but shall and will 
at all times hereafter maintain and keep the same in good repair and 
condition and preserve it as it now is as £u* as possible without altering 
on any account the style or form thereof, 



7. pubchase of pabt of the site of downing 
College. 1897-1902. 

In 1895 Downing College was empowered under the 
provisions of the Downing College Act to sell their surplus 
ground; and shortly afterwards approached the Financial 
Board with a view to the purchase of certain portions of it 
by the University. Three pieces of ground were accordingly 
bought. 

L In 1896 (13 May) the Financial Board recommended 
the purchase of two acres fronting Downing Street, at a cost 
of £15,000, on the following conditions : 

(1) The Uniyersity to coyenant that they will not for a period 
of fifty years from the completion of the purchase erect on the site or 
allow the erection thereon of any buildings for other than Academical 
purposes. 



26 Site of Downing College 

(2) The strips of land shewn on the Plan along the Downing 
Place side and the Tennis Court Road side not to be included in the 
two acres, but to be devoted to widening the roads. 

(3) The purchase to be conditional on the College diverting that 
portion of Hobson's Conduit, which now runs under the College 
grounds from a point near the Fitzwilliam Street gate to the Downing 
Street gate at the end of the avenue — the University agreeing to pay 
one-third (being the proportionate share) of the whole cost of such 
diversion. 

(4) The University and the College to covenant with each other 
not to erect any building above 15 feet in height within a distance to 
be agreed upon on either side of the southern boundary of the land 
purchased. 

(5) The trees standing on the site to be taken by the University 
at a valuation as timber. 

(6) The purchase money to be paid as follows : £5000 on 
obtaining possession, and the remainder by five annual instalments 
of £2000 each with interest at 3 per cent, on so much of the purchase 
money as remains from time to time unpaid \ 

This Report of the Financial Board was confirmed by the 
following Grace, which passed the Senate 11 June, 1896; 

That the Vice-Chancellor be authorised on behalf of the University 
to enter into a contract with the Governing Body of Downing College 
for the purchase of two acres of the Downing College land adjoining 
Downing Street, as shewn on Plan B, at the price of £15,000 u|)on the 
terms stated in the foregoing Report. 

IL In 1897 (10 November) the Financial Board, acting 
on the suggestion of the Sites S^nidicate, recommended the 
purchase of a second piece*. The following Grace, allowing 
this, passed the Senate 9 December, 1897 : 

That the Secretary of the Financial Board be authorised to enter 
into a contract with the Governing Body of Downing College for the 
piuchase of an additional strip of land, 40 feet in width, along the 
southern boundary of the land already purchased ; the price to be at 
the rate of £5000 an acre, and the purchase to bo subject to the same 
conditions (so far as they are applicable) as those under which the 
previous purchase was eflfected^. 

1 Camb, Univ, Reporter, 19 May, p. 766. 
• Camb. Univ. Reporter, 16 November, p. 203. 

> The price paid was £1972. See Grace to seal the conveyance, 16 June, 
1898. Ibid. p. 1054. 



Site of Downing College 27 

III. In June 1901 the Council of the Senate invited the 
Financial Board to take into consideration the possibility of 
acquiring by purchase or lease or otherwise a further portion 
of the Downing College Estate which the College had begun 
to develop for building-purposes by constructing a road with 
a sewer in a direct line from Fitzwilliam Street to Regent 
Street. Negotiations were accordingly set on foot, and in 
the Michaelmas term the Master of Downing College com- 
municated the following resolution to the Vice-Chancellor, 
dated 19 October 1901 : 

That the College would be willing to sell the land (six acres more or 
leas) to the University for Academical purposes at the price of £4000 
per acre if the land be conveyed and the price paid at once ; or, in case 
of deferred payment, at such a price per acre as would correspond to 
the present investment of £4000 in English Qovemment Securities, the 
interest during the period of delay to be reckoned at one per cent, per 
annum during the first two years, two per cent, during the second two, 
and three per cent, thenceforward. 

This proposal was accepted by the Financial Board as a 
basis for further negotiation, and a provisional agreement was 
arrived at with the College^, when the Board of Agriculture 
declined to give their assent partly on the question of price, 
partly on that of the proposed mode of payment. The point 
finally insisted on by the Board was that an annual income at 
the rate of at least £120 per acre should be secured to the 
College by the sale of the land. 

After a long discussion with the Board of Agriculture the 
Financial Board recommended in a Report dated 15 March, 
1902^, that the following conditions of purchase should be 
accepted by the Senate : 

(1) That the price shall be fixed on the basis of an annual rent- 
charge of £120 per acre, the rent-charge to be redeemable by the 
University at any time (in such instalments as may be agreed upon) 
by the transfer to the College of such * Trustee' Securities, to be 
selected by the University and approved by the College and the Board 
of Agriculture, as will produce an income equal to the amount of rent- 
charge redeemed. 

^ See Beport of the Financial Board, 15 November, 1901, Cawb» Univ, 
Reporter, p. 225. 
» Ibid, p. 627. 



28 Site of Downing College 

(2) That the purchase shall be effected in three portious, namely, 
one-third as on January 1, 1902, one-third as on January 1, 1904, and 
the remaining one-third as on January 1, 1906. 

(3) The University to covenant that they will not erect on the 
site or allow the erection thereon of any buildings for other than 
Academical purposes, this covenant to be limited, in respect of the 
northern half of the site, to a period of 60 years from the date of 
contract 

(4) The University to pay the cost of such portion of the sewer 
as is not essential for tiie purposes of Downing College; the right of 
use of the sewer to be reserved to the Qo\\&g<d. 

(5) The University to pay a reasonable compensation to the 
contractor in consequence of the construction of the road not being 
proceeded with. 

(6) Both parties to covenant that if any road is made by either 
of them within 5 feet of the boimdary, the pajty making such road 
shall indemnify the other party against any liability in respect 
thereof. 

(7) The University and the College to covenant with each other 
not to erect any building, any part of which within 20 feet of the 
boundary shall be above a plane drawn at an angle of 45 d^rees to the 
horiison cutting the vertical plane of the boundary at a height of 10 feet 
from the groimd. 

(8) The boundary line from A to B, as shown on the plan, to be 
at a distance of 10 feet to the south of the central line of the sewer. 

(9) The University to be released from the restrictive covenants 
with reference to the strips of land on the south, the east, and the 
west sides of the site already purchased. 

The following Grace passed the Senate 22 May, 1902 : 

That the Recommendation contained in the Amended Report dated 
16 March 1902, of the Financial Board on proposed Purchase of 
Downing Site, namely. 

That the yice-Chancellor on behalf of the University be authorised 
to enter into a contract with the Ooverning Body of Downing College 
for the purchase of the site shown on the plan accompanying this 
Report, comprising about six acres and a quarter, upon the terms 
stated in the Report 

be approved. 



II. 



ROYAL GRANTS AND LETTERS, 
ACTS OF PARLIAMENT 



Grant of three Stationers or Printers 31 



1. Letters Patent of King Henry tbe Eighth granting 

TO THE University three Stationers or Printers. 

20 July, 26 Henry 8, 1534. 

Henricus [etc] Sciatis quod nos...concessimus et licentiam dedimus 
ac per presentes concedimus et licenciam damns pro nobis et heredibus 
nostris dilectis nobis in Christo Cancellario magistris et scolaribus 
vniuersitatis nostre Cantebrigie, 

Quod ipsi et successores sui imperpetuum per eorum scripta sub 
sigiUo Cancellarii dicte Vniuersitatis sigillata de tempore in tempus 
assignent, eligant, et pro perpetuo habeant inter se et infra Vniuersitatem 
nostram predictam perpetuo manentes et inhabitantes tres Stacionarios 
et librorum impressores seu vetiditores tam alienigenas et natos extra 
obedienciam nostram, qiiam indigenos nostros et natos infra obedien- 
ciam nostram tam conductas quam proprias domus habentes et tenentea 

Qui quidem Stacionarii sive impressores librorum in forma predicta 
assignati, et eorum quilibet onmimodos libros per predictum CanceU 
larium vel eius vices gerentem et tres doctores ibidem approbates seu 
imposterum approbandos ibidem imprimere et tam libros illos, quam 
alios libros vbicimque tam extra quam infra regnum nostrum impresses 
sic vt predicitur per predictum Cancellarium seu eius vices gerentem et 
tres doctores ibidem approbates seu approbandos tam in eadem Vniuer- 
sitate quam alibi infra regnum nostrum ubicimque placuerint venditioni 
exponere licite valeant seu valeat et impune. Et quod iidem Stacionarii 
sive impressores etiam extra obedienciam nostram oriundi, vt predicitur, 
et eorum * quilibet quamdiu infra Vniuersitatem predictam moram 
traxerint, et negocio predicto intendant, in omnibus et per omnia 
tanquam iideles subditi et legei nostri reputentur, habeantur, et per- 
tractentur, ac quilibet eorum reputetur, habeatur, et pertractetur ; ac 
omnibus et sing^is libertatibus, consuetudinibus legibus et privilegiis 
gaudere et vti valeant, et quilibet eorum valeat libere et quiete, prout 
aliquis fidelis subditus et legeus noster quoque mode vti et gaudere 
possit, ac lettum et scottum, taxa, tallagium, et alias consuetudines et 
imposiciones quascimque non aliter nee alio mode quam ceteri fideles 
subditi et legei nostri nobis solvunt et contribuunt, selvaut et centri- 
buant: aliquo statute, actu, ordinacione sive provisione inde in con- 
trarium facto, edite, sive proviso in aliquo non obstante. 

Proviso semper quod dicti Stacionarii sive impressores extra obedi- 
enciam nostram sic, vt premittitiir, eriimdi, omnia et omnimodas 
custumias, subsidia, et alia denaria pro rebus et mercandisis suis extra 
vel infra r^num nostrum educendis siue inducendis nobis debite de 
tempore in tempus selvant, prout alienigeno nobis solvimt et non aliter. 

In cujus rei testimonium has literas nostras fieri fecimus patentes. 
Teste meipee apud Westmonasterium vioesimo die Julii, anno regni 
nostri vicesimo sextet 



The Univer- 
sity may 
appoint 3 
BUktionere or 
printers or 
salesmen of 
books. 

Thevmay 
be either 
foreifcners or 
natives. 

These 
stationers 
may print 
what boolcs 
they please, 
if approved 
by the Chan- 
cellor or his 
deputy and 
three 
docton. 



Provided 
always that 
the three 
stationers 
pay all dues. 



1 CoUa tod with the original in the Registry of the University, Charters^ etc. 185. 



82 Arms granted to the University 

2. Grant of Arms to the University. 
9 June, 1573. 

Omnibus et singulis tarn nobilibus et generosis, quam aliis ad 
quoscumque presentes litere peruenerint Bobertus Cooke armiger alias 
Clarencieuk summus Heraldus et Bex armorum australis orientaUs et 
occidentalis istius Begni Anglie partium a Trenta fluuio austrum 
versus salutem in domino sempitemam. 

Cum hactenus semper ab ipsis mtmdi primordiis hominum precla- 
rorum facinora strenue et fortiter ab ipsis gesta variis multisque monu- 
mentis orbi terrarum innotuerint; Cumque inter cetera precipuum et 
maxime vsitatum extiterit, insignium que arma dicimus in scutis ges- 
tatio, que virtutis et glorie bellice argumenta sunt varieque pro homi- 
num meritis et dignitate tribui solent ; Qui quidem mos sicut initio 
prudenter ccepit vsurpari, quo magis ad virtutem capessendam animi 
hominum aocenderentiu*, ita a posteris fideliter obseruatus est, et adhuc 
viget, vt qui per virtutem ad reipublice emolumentum honeste vitsa 
splendore conspicm sunt dum in renmi pulcherrimarum et vtilium 
actione versantur, tum ipsi dum vivunt honorem percipiant, tum 
eundem ad posteros suos perpetuo successiuros transmittant. Quod si 
corporis robur et fortitudo bellica hoc modo commendationem aocipiat, 
multo certe magis vere dei religionis prouectio, egregialiberalium artium 
cognitio et animi preclare dotes eam laudem et gloriam promerentur 
Neque id solum in singulis quibusque personis et priuatis, sed in 
rebuspublicis, multo magis iis scilicet que vere religionis doctrine et 
pietatis nutrices sunt et quasi fontes. 

Cum igitur in illustri isto Anglie regno due tantum sint Academie 
easque non minus ad istius imperii decus conseruandum vtiles ac neces- 
sarisB quam ad humani corporis incolumitatem sunt occuli, sequum est 
ut vtraque illarum ad maiorem vere religionis et bonanim literarum 
propagationem eiusmodi insignibus mtmdo innotescat, precipue vero 
ista Cantabrigiensis Ozoniensi et antiquior et iUustrior. Que cum anno 
ante Christum natum trecentesimo nonagesimo quarto a preclaro Can- 
tabro fundata fuerit semper ad nostra vsque tempora Uteris et literatis 
in omni genere viris ad gloriam istius regni immortalem floruit. 

Ego itaque Robertus Cooke muneris mei quod gero autoritate tribuo 
concede et confirmo honorato Oulielmo [Cecil] ^ ordinis garterii equitl 
domino de Biurghlej summo Ajiglie questori sine Thesaurario, et 
Academic Cantabrigiensis cancellario dignissimo magistris item et 
soolaribus eiusdem accademiee et eorum successoribus in perpetuum 
ista insignia siue arma que hie in ma^gine depicta sunt, et vt gallice 
hie explanantur, videlicet gutes survng crauc dermines efUre quaire Lions 
pctssarU cPar vng Liwe de fftUes, vt ea sibi vendicent et pro suis vsurpent 
perpetuis futuris temporibus, 

1 CitsUt, MS. 



and to the Regiua Professors 33 

In cuiua rei teBtiraonium has literas fieri fecimus Patentes, datas 
Londini nono Junii anno domini 1573, anno regni regine nostre Eliza- 
bethe decimo quinto^ 

[Signed-] Rob. Cooke, Alias Clarencieulx 
Roy Darmes. 



3. Grant of Arms to the five Regius Professors. 
8 November, 1590. 

To all and singuler as well nobles and gentilz as others to whome 
these presentes shall come be seene heard read or vnderstood Robert 
Cooke Esquire alias Clarencieulx Kinge of Armes and principall heralde 
of the Southe East and west partes of this Realme of England from 
the Rjuer of Trent Southwards sendeth greetinge in our Lord God 
euerlasting. 

Whereas aunciently from the bcgiuninge the vertuous actes of 
worthey persons haue bene commended to the worlde with sondrey 
monumentes and rememberances of their good deseartes, Emongest the 
which the chiefest and most vsuall hath bene the bearing of signes and 
tokens in shildes called Armes beinge euident Demonstrations and 
testimonies of prowes and valuer diuersly distributed accordinge to the 
qualities and deseartes of the persons meritinge the same, which order 
as it was prudently deiused to stirre vp and en flame the hartes of men 
to the imitation of vertue, euen so hath the same ben continued from 
tyme to tyme and yet is continually obserued, to the entent that such 
as haue don comendable seruice to their Prince or Countrey either in 
warre or peace, may therfore receaue due honor in their Lyues and also 
deriue the same successiuely to their posteritie for euer ; 

And wheras King Henry the eight of famous memory hath founded 
in the Vniuersitye of Cambridge for the aduancement of Learning fiue 
lecturers of Phisick, Lawe, Deuinitye, Hebrew and Greke: and hath 
appoynted to the Lecturers and Readers of the same sciences great and 
liberall Stipendes yerely for euer to endure ; 

And beinge required of Thomas Lorkin Esquire, Doctor of Phisicke 
and publicke reader of the Kings phisicke lectmre in the sayd vniuer- 
sitye of Cambridge to appoynte and grauut vnto the said fine Readers 
seuerall Armes and Crestes which the said Lecturers and professors 
might giue and beare lawfidly to them and their Successors in lyke 
place and Office for euer ; hereupon I the said Clarencieulx King of 
Arms, considering his request to be very reasonable and requised seinge 
in all vniuersities publicke professors and Readers be the chiefe 
members chosen as the worthiest fitt for their professions ; In con- 
sideracion of the premisses by power and authoritie vnto my Office 
annexed and graunted by letters patentes vnder the great Seale of 
^ From the original in the Registry of the University, Box I. 1. 

c. 3 



34 Arms granted to the Regius Professors 

England baue assigned giuen and graunted to these fyue Readers and 
their Successors in Ijke place and office for euer : Hiese Armes and 
Creasts following; 

That is to saye the fyrst to the Phisicke Reader that he maye beare 
azure, a fesse ermines, betwene three Losenges gold, on a chiffe gules, 
a Lyon gardant gold marked in his syde with this letter M Sables, 
and for the Creast vpon the healme on a wreathe gold and azure a 
Quinquangle siluer, called Simbolum SanitcUis manteled gules doubled 
siluer. 

Secondly to the Lawe Reader the field purple, a Crosse moline gold, 
on a chief gules, a lion passant gardant gold, marked in his syde with 
this letter L Sables, and to the Creast, ^'pon the healme, on a wreathe 
purple and gold, a Bee volant gold manteled gules doubled Siluer. 

Thirdly to the Diuinitye Reader the field gules on a Crosse Ermen 
betwene foure Doues Siluer a Booke of the firsts leaues gold clasped, 
noted in the midest with this Qreke letter e Theta sables and to the 
Creast vpon the healme on a wreathe Siluer and gules a Done volant 
siluer with an Oliue braunche vert in his beke, manteled gules doubled 
Siluer. 

Fourthly the Hebrewe Reader the fielde Siluer the Hebrewe letter 
Jl Tawe sables, on a chiffe gules a Lyon passant gardant gold, marked in 
his syde with this letter 11 Sables, and to the Creast vpon the healme 
on a wreathe Siluer and sables a Turtle Done azure, manteled gules 
doubled Siluer. 

Fifbley the Qreke Reader the fielde SUuer and Sables parte per 
cheueron, in the first these two Qreke letters A Alpha and Q Omega 
sables, and in the seconde a Cicade or Gresshopper Siluer, on a chiffe 
gules a Lyon passant gardant gold marked in his side with this letter 
Q sables, and to the Creast vpon the healme on a wreathe Siluer and 
sables an Owle Siluer, leges beake and eares gold, manteled gules doubled 
Siluer, as more playnlcy apperith depicted in the margent. 

To haue and to hold the sayd Armes and Creasts and euery part 
and parcell of them, vnto the sayd fyue King's Readers or Lectorers and 
to euery of them and to their Successors for euer, duringe the tyme of 
their Lectures and Office, and they and euery one of them to vse beare 
and shewe in shield Coat Armoure or otherwise, and therin to be 
reuested at their libertye and pleasure (according to the Auncient 
lawes of Armes) without ympediment lett or interuption of any person 
or persons. 

In witnes wherof I the said Clarencieulx King of Armes haue here- 
unto subscribed my name and likewise putt the Seale of myne Office 
the viii* daye of Nouember in the yere of our Lord God 1690 and in 
the xxxii**> yere of the Reigne of our most gratious Souuereigne Lady 
Queene Elizabcthe &c.^ 

[Signed:] Robert Cooke. 

> From the original in the Registry of the UniverBity, Box I. 2. 



Grant of two Imrges^es in Farliament 36 

4. Letters Patent of King James the First, grantino 
TO the University two burgesses in Parliament. 
12 March, 1603-4. 

Jacobus Dei gratia [etc] salutem. 

Cum Academia et Vniversitas nostra Cantabrigie in Comitatu 
noetro Cantabrigie antiqua Vniversitas sit ex sexdecem Collegiis Aulis 
bonarumque literarum hospiciis constana, fundatis partim per illustris- 
simoe et preclarissimos prpgenitores nostros Reges ac Reginas huius 
Regni, et partim per Archiepiscopos, proceres, magnates, nobilee, 
Episcopos, et alios ^gregios pios et devotos homines ; necnon preclaris 
ct amplis redditibus revencionibus possessionibus privilegiis aliisque 
rebus dotatis et auctis ad honorem Dei et ad pietatis virtutis erudi- 
cionis et doctrine sustentationem et augmeutum ; in quibus quidcm 
Collegiis Aulis et Hospiciis multa Statuta localia, Constitutiones, 
ordinationes, Jura, et instituta tam pro bono Regimine et gubemacione 
eorundem Collegiorum Aularum et hospitiorum et eorum membrorum 
ac studencium in eisdem ac aliorum degencium ibidem, quam pro loca- 
tione, dimissione, disposicione, et preservatione reddituum, reven- 
cionum, possessiouum aliarumque rerum prefatis Collegiis Aulis et 
Hospiciis datarum, concessarum assignatarum sive confirmatarum per 
eorum fundatores aut aliter facta edita et ordinata fuerunt, ad quorum 
quidem Statutorum, constitucionum, ordinacionum, Jurium, institut- 
orum, et privilegiorum observacionem ac manutencionem omnes illi sive 
eorum plurimi super sacrosancta dei Evangelia Sacramenta prestaut 
CorporaUa ; 

Cumque temporibus retroactis precipueque nuperis multa Statuta 
et Actus Parliamenti facta et edita fuerunt tam pro et concementes 
locationem, dimissionem, disposiciouem, et preservacionem reddituum 
revencionum et possessionum eorundem Coll^orum Aularum et 
Hospiciorum, quam pro et concerneiites gubernacionom et ordina- 
cionem eorundem Collegiorum Aularum et Hospiciorum et eorum 
membrorum studencium ac degencium ibidem ; idcirco opere pretium 
et necessarium videtur, quod dicta Vniversitas in qua omnes Sciencie 
tam divine quam humane omnesque adeo artes liberates culte et 
profease sunt, eadem Vniversitate multitudine virorum pietato sapiencia 
doctrina et int^ritate preditorum abundante, pro communi bono cum 
tocius Reipublice turn Vniversitatis predicte et cuiuslibet predictorum 
Coll^orum Aularum et Hospiciorum, habeant Burgenses Parliamenti 
de seipsis qui de tempore in tempus supreme ille Curie Parliamenti 
notom facient verum Statum eiusdem Yniuersitatis et cuiuslibet 
Collegii Aule et Hospicii ibidem, ita ut nullum Statutum aut Actus 
generalis illis aut eorum alicui privatim sine iusta et debita noticia et 
informacione in ea parte habita preiudicet aut noceat. 

3—2 



36 Ghrant by King James the First 

Cumque predicta Yniversitas sit et per longum tempus fuerit corpus 
politicum et corporatum per nomen Cancellarii, Magistrorum et Schola- 
rium VniveiBitatis GantabrigisB, Sciatis quod nos pro summo illo aiuore 
quo dictam Academiam et bonarum literarum Studiosos omnes pro- 
sequimur, De gracia nostra special! ac ex certa scientia et mero motu 
nostris voluimus et concessimus et per preaentes pro nobis heredibus 
et successoribuB nostris volumus et concedimus prefatis Canoellario 
Magistris et Scholaribus Yniversitatis Cantabrigie et successoribus 
suis, Necnon per presentes ordinamus et stabilimus perpetuis fiituris 
temporibus Quod sint et erint in dicta Vniversitate nostra Cantabrigie 
duo Burgenses Parliamenti uostri beredum et successorum nostrorum ; 
Quodque predicti Cancel larius Magistri et Scbolares Yniversitatis 
Cantabrigie et Successores sui virtute precepti, mandati, sen proces- 
sus, super breve nostrum heredum et Successoruni nostrorum de 
electione Burgensium Parliamenti in ea parte debitum directum habe- 
ant et babebunt potestatem autboritatem et facultatem eligendi et 
nominandi duos de discretion bus et magis sufBcientibus viris de 
predicta Yniversitate pro tempore existentibus fore Burgenses Parlia- 
menti nostri beredum et Successorum nostrorum pro eadem Academia 
sine Yniversitate, eosdemque Burgenses sic electos ad onera et custagia 
dictorum Cancellarii Magistrorum et Scbolarium Yniversitatis Canta- 
brigie et Sucessorum suorum pro tempore ezistencium mittere in 
Parliamentum nostrum heredum et Successorum nostrorum vbi tunc 
tentum fuerit, eisdem modo et forma prout in aliis locis Civitatibus 
Burgis siue villis Regni nostri Anglie vsitatum et consuetum est. 

Quos quidem Burgenses sic electos et nominatos volumus interesse 
et moram facere ad Parliamentum nostrum beredum et successorum 
nostrorum ad onera et Custagia dictorum Cancellarii Magistrorum et 
Scbolarium Yniversitatis Cantabrigie pro tempore existencium durante 
tempore quo huiusmodi Parliamentum teneri contigerit, in consimilibus 
modo et forma prout alii Burgenses Parliamenti pro quibuscumque 
aliis locis Civitatibus Burgis siue villis... infra Begnum Anglie faciant 
seu facere consueverunt. Et qui quidem Burgenses in huiusmodi 
Parliamento nostro heredum et Successorum nostrorum babebunt voces 
suas tam affirmativas quam negativas ceteraque omnia et singula 
ibidem facient et exequantur ut alii Bui^genses vel alius Burgensis 
Parliamenti nostri pro quibuscunque aliis locis Civitatibus Burgis 
siue villis... habeant, faciant, et exequantur, aut habere, facere, et exequi 
valeant seu possint ratione aut modo quacunque. 

Et vlterius dedimus et concessimus ac per presentes pro nobis 
heredibus et Successoribus nostris damns et concedimus prefatis 
Cancellario Magistris et Scholaribus Yniversitatis Cantabrigie et Suc- 
cessoribus suis ac etiam precipimus et firmiter pro nobis heredibus 
et Successoribus nostris mandamus omnibus Yicecomitibus Officiariis 
et Ministris nostris heredum et Successorum nostrorum quibuscunque 
Comitatus nostri Cantabrigie pro tempore existentibus quibus aliquod 



of two burgesses in Parliament 37 

breue nostrum sive aliqua brevia nostra de elections Burgensium 
Parliament! infra dictam Academiam sine Vniversitatem Cantabrigie 
mode directa sunt aut aliquo tempore imposterum dirigontur, quod 
quilibet talis Vicecomes officiarius siue Minister cui aliquod huiusmodi 
breue, siue aliqua huiusmodi brevia nostra sic ut prefertur directa sunt 
yel imposterum dirigentur fadet preceptum suum predictis Canoellario 
Magistris et Scholaribus Vniversitatis Cantabrigie pro tempore ex- 
istentibus pro electione et retomacione eorundem duorum Bui'gensium 
secundum formam et effectum eorundem Brevis siue Brevium. Et he 
litere nostre Patentes vel Irrotulamenta earundem erunt tam dictis 
Cancellario Magistris et Scholaribus, et Successoribus suis quam omni- 
bus et singulis yicecomitibus Officiariis et Ministris nostris heredum 
et Successorum nostrorum quibuscumque sufiiciens warrantum et 
ezoneratio in hac parte. 

£t vlterius volumus et per presentes concedimus prefatis Cancellario 
Magistris et Scholaribus et Successoribus suis Quod he litere nostre 
patentes erunt in omnibus et per omnia firme, valide, bone, sufficientes, 
et effectuales in lege secundum veram intencionem earundem, aliquo 
Statuto, Actu, ordinacione, siue provisione, antehac facta, edita, 
ordinata, siue provisa, aut aliqua alia re causa vel materia quacunque 
in aliquo non obstante. Volumus etiam ac per presentes concedimus 
prefatis Cancellario Magistris et Scholaribus quod habeant et habebunt 
has literas nostras patentes sub magno Sigillo nostro Anglie debito 
modo factas et sigillatas absque fine seu feodo magno vel parvo nobis 
in hanaperio nostro seu alibi ad vsum nostrum proinde quoquo modo 
reddendo, solvendo, seu faciendo. Eo quod ezpressa mencio de vero 
valore annuo aut de aliquo alio valore vel certitudine premissomm siue 
eorum alicuius aut de aliis don is siue concessionibus per nos vel per 
aliquem Antecessonim siue Progenitorum nostrorum prefatis Cancel- 
lario Magistris et Scholaribus aut eorum alicui vel aliquibus ante hec 
temix)ra factis in presentibus minime facta ezistit, aliquo Statuto, 
Actu, ordinacione, prouisione, proclamacione, siue reetriccione in con- 
trarium inde antehac habita, facta, edita ordinata siue prouisa, aut 
aliqua alia re, causa, vel materia quacunque in aliquo non obstante. 

In cuius rei testimonium has literas nostras fieri fecimus patentes. 
Teste meipso apud Westmonasterium, duodecimo die Martii, Anno 
B^ni nostri Anglie Francie et Hibernie primo et Scotie Tricesimo 
Septimo^ 



^ From the original in the Begistry of the University, Charters^ etc. 
No. 195. 



38 Rectories of Somersham and Terrbigton 



Letters patent of King James the First, giving 
THE Rectories of Somersham and Terrington to 
the University. 26 August, 1605. 



It \B desir- 
able to pro- 
mote the 
study €i 
Theologj. 



The stipends 
of theLadj 
Marsaret's 
Beaaer. and 
of the King's 
Professor 
are so small 
that they 
barely suffice 
for food and 
clothing. 



We there- 
fore grant to 
the Univer- 
sity the 
rectories of 
Somersham 
in Hunts, 



and of 
Terrington 
in Norfolk. 



... Cum Deus omnipoiens imperium ndstnim sic ampliauerit et 
exaltauerit supra omnium progenitorum et antecessorum nostrum vt 
monarchiam totius magne Britanie cum aliis regnis et dominiis summa 
cum pace fauente Deo iure avito et hereditario adepti sumus ac mag- 
uanimos variosque leones sine vUa pugna auspice Christo summa 
omnium acclamacione consociauimus, Idcirco et nas Christi gloriam 
eiusque veram religionem (qua vt nihil est sanctius in terris ita firmius 
reipublice omamentum esse nullum potest) exaltare et sacrosancte 
Theologie scienciam augere et ampliare disposuimus. Et quia sti- 
pendia tam Regii professoris siue lectoris sacrosancte Theolpgie in alma 
Academia nostra Cantabrigie quam lectoris lecture sacre Theologie per 
Margaretam Comitissam Richmondie matrem Regis Henrici septimi in 
vniversitate Cantabrigie ordinate adeo exilia sunt ut vix neccssario 
victui et vestitui talium virorum ministrare sufficiant, et vere dictum 
est hand facile emergunt quormu virtutibus obstat res angusta domi, 
huic defectui succurrere, eosdemque professores siue lectores pro tem- 
pore existentes ampliori prouentu et reuencione sine idla dilatatione 
perpetuis futuris temporibus dotare decreuimus. 

Sciatis igitur quod nos... damns et concedimus Cancellario magistris 
et Scholaribus vniuersitatis nostre Cantabrigie et successoribus suis 
Totam iUam aduocacionem donacionem liberam disposicionem et Jus 
patronatus Rectorie de Somersham in comitatu nostro Huntington 
vnacum Colne et Pidley et aliis Capellis iuribus membris et pertinenciis 
suis vniuersis. 

Necnon totam illam aduocacionem donacionem liberam disposicio- 
nem et ius patronatus Rectorie de Terington in comitatu nostro 
Norffolcie cum suis iuribus membris et pertinenciis vniuersis. 



Somersham 
is to benefit 
the King's 
Professor, 



Tenendum de nobis heredibus et successoribus nostris in puram et 
peri^etuam elemosinam pro omnibus seruiciis redditibus ezaccionibus 
et demaundis quibuscunque proinde nobis heredibus et successoribus 
nostris quoquo modo reddendis soluendis vel faciendis. Ac pro eo quod 
predicta Rectoria de Somersham vnacum Colne et Pidley et aliis 
Capellis iuribus membris et pertinenciis suis pro meliori sustentacione 
et manutencione dicti Regii Professoris siue lectoris sacrosancte Theo- 
logie in dicta vniuersitate Cantabrigie pro tempore existeutis, et pre- 



Rectories of SomersJiam and Terrington 39 

dicta Becioria de Termgton cum suis juribus membris et pertinenciis T^^^^^^ 
Tniaerais pro meliori sustentacione et manutencione dicti lectoris lee- Maivaret's 
tiue 8acro Theologie per Margaretam Comitisaam Richmondie matrem 
Begis Henrici Septimi in vniuersitate Cantabr' ordinati pro tempore ^J^£*° 
ezisteDtiB prefatis Cancellario magistris et Scholaribus et successoribus appropria- 
suisadeo oerte et sufficienter appropriari possint nee eedem seperales rectories, the 
Bectorie adeo commode vniri vel annecti possint predicto seperali parliament 
officio Professoris sine lectoris sacrosancte Theologie infra dictam obtained, 
yniuersitatem Cantabrigie pro tempore existentis et durantis tempore 
quo ipei publici Professores siue lectores ibidem seperaliter et respectiue 
extiterint secundum veram intencionem presentium nee aHqui perpetui 
▼icarii infra easdem Rectorias ad euram animarum deseruiendum ac 
diuina seruicia respectiue celebrandum perpetuo dotari adeo eongrue 
possint et yaleant nee aliqua alia conveiancia et assurancia de et' in 
premissis adeo efficax et sufficiens in lege :fieri vel haberi potest, prout 
aathoritate parliament! hec aut eorum aliquod fieri et prefici possint : 
Nobis beneplacitum est^ quod ad proximam Sessionem parliament! 
nostri tenendam, in tali modo et forma authoritate parliament! stabili- 
tum sit Yt prefatuB Regius Professor siue lector pro tempore existens 
(quam diu in officio illo extiterit) dicta Rectoria de Somersham aut 
saltern omnibus et singulis proficiiis eiusdem pro sustentacione et 
manutencione sua in eodem officio (competent! portione pro perpetuo 
vicario ibidem diuina celebraturo tantumodo excopta) peri)etu!s futuris 
temporibus bene et qulete gaudeat. Et vt prcfatus lector lecture sacre 
Theol<>gie per Margaretam Comitissam Richmondie matrem Regis 
Henrici septimi in vniuersitate Cantabr' ordinaV pro tempore existen' 
(quamdiu in officio illo extiterit) dicta Rectoria de Terington aut 
saltem omnibus et singidis proficuis eiusdem (competent! portione pro 
perpetuo vicario ibidem diuina celebraturo tamtumodo excepta) pro 
sustentacione et manutencione sua in eodem officio perpetuis futuris 
temporibus bene et quiete gaudeat. 

# ♦ # ♦ ♦ 

In cuius testimonium has literas nostras fieri fecimus patentes 
Teste me ipso apud Westmonasterium vicesimo sexto die August! 
Anno regni nostri Anglie ffirancie et hibemie tercio et Scocie tricesimo 
nonoK 



1 From an office copy of the letters patent enrolled in the Pablic Becord 
Office, collated with the original (much damaged) in the Registry of the 
Umversify, Chartent etc. No. 197. 1. 



40 



Presentaiion to Livings 



The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge to 

PRESENT TO LIVINGS THE PaTRONS OF WHICH ARE 

Roman Catholics. 
Act of Parliament, 3 Jac. I, Cap. v. (1606). 



Popiah 
Recnsante 
oonylci dis- 
abled from 



9 Benefloes ; 
and their 
riglits of 
presentetioii 
made over 
to the two 
Universi- 
ties. 



Proviso 
against 
PloraUties. 



13. And be it further enacted by the authority of this present 
Pfiurliament, that everie person or persons that is or shall be a Popish 
Recusant convict, during the tyme that he shalbe or remaine a 
Recusant, shall from and after the end of this present Session of 
Parliament be utterly disabled to present to any Benefice, with cure or 
without cure, Prebend or any other ecclesiasticall living, or to collate 
or nominate to any Freeschole Hospitall or Donative whatsoever, and 
from the beginning of this present Session of Parliament shaU likewise 
be disabled to graunt any avoydance to any Benefice Prebend or other 
ecclesiasticall living; and that the Chauncellour and Schollers of the 
University of Ozforde, soe often as any of them shalbe voide, shall 
have the presentacion nominacion oollacion and donacion of and to 
everie such Benefice Prebend or ecclesiasticall living, Schoole Hospitall 
and Donative, sett lying and being in the counties of Oxford Kent 
Middlesex Sussex Surrey Hampshire Berkshire Buckinghamshire 
Gloucestershire Worcestershire Staffordshire Warwickshire Wiltshire 
Somersetshire Devonshire Comewall Dorsetshire Herefordshire North- 
amptonshire Pembrockshire Carmarthenshire Brecknockshire Mon- 
mouthshire Cardiganshire Mountgomeryshire, the Citye of London, 
and in every citye and towne being a countye of it selfe lying & being 
within any of the limittes or precinctes of any of the counties afore- 
saide, or in or within any of them, as shall happen to be voide during 
such tyme as the patron thereof shalbe and n^maine a Recusant convict 
as aforesaide ; and that the Chancellor and Schollers of the University 
of Cambridge shall have the presentacion nominacion coUacion and 
donacion of and to everie such Benefice Prebend or ecclesiasticall living, 
Schoole Hospitall and Donative, set lying and being in the counties of 
Essex Hartfordshire Bedfordshire Cambridgeshire Huntingdonshire 
Suffolke Norffolke Licolneshire Rutlandshire Leicestershire Derbishire 
Nottinghamshire Shropshire Cheshire Lancashire Yorkeshire the 
County of Durham Northumberland Cumberland Westmoreland Rad- 
norshire Denbighshire Flintshire Carnarvonshire Angleseyshire 
Merionethshire Qlamorganshire, and in everie city and towne being a 
county of itselfe lying within any of the limits or precinctes of any of 
the counties last before mencioned, or in or within any of them, as 
shall happen to be voide during such tyme as the patron thereof shall 
be and remaine a Recusant convict as aforesaide : 

Provided that neither the saide Chauncellors and Schollers of 
either of the saide Universities shall present or nominate to any 



May lyrint AlriM,naAikSy Bibles, Prayer-Boolcs 41 

Benefice with cure Prebend or other ecclesiasticall living any such 
person as shall then have any other Benefice with cure of soules ; and if 
any such presentacion or nominaciou shalbe had or made of any such 
person soe beneficed, the said presentacion or nominacion shalbe 
utterly voide, any thing in this Acte to the contrarye notwithstanding*. 



7. Order of Council 10 December 1623, giving leave 
TO the University to print Almanacks. 

... That the University shall not print Almanacks whereof the 
Copies are now belonging to the Stationers, nor any other Almanacks 
to be hereafter published, whereof the first Copies shall be brought to 
the Stationers ; but the University shall print such Prognostications* 
hereafter to be made whereof the first copies shall be brought to their 
Printer^. 



8. Order of Council, giving leave to the University 
to print Bibles and Prayer-Books. 16 April, 1629. 

At Whyt«hall the 16**» of Aprill 1629. 
Present: 
Lo : Keeper Lo ; vise. Dorchester 

Lo : President Lo : Bp. Winchester 

Lo : Priuie Seale Lo : Bp. of London 

Ea : of Holland M' Sec. Coke. 

This day the Lords and other Committees did heare the Coutro- 
uersies betweene the Uniuersitie of Cambridge on the one parte, and 
the Printers to his Majesty and the Company of the Stationers on the 
other parte, referred to them from his Majesty by three seuerall 
Referrences: the one of the first of Nouemb: 1628; the other the 4*** 
of Decemb. 1628; the third the 15"» of May 1628; and after long 
debate of Councell learned on both sides, in the presence of all the 
parties, It was finally ordered by their Lordshipps with consent of all 
the parties for an absolute end of all controuersies betweene them, 
notwithstanding any pretences or allegacions on eyther side, by reason 
of any Charters, Lettres, Pattents, decrees, orders, Reports, or proui- 
sions whatsoeuer, 

* See Enactments in Parliament^ 8vo, Oxf. 1869, p. 40. 
> A Bubseqaent Order dated 25 January, 1625—26, pronounces this word 
to be the same as '* Almanacks." Ibid. 68. 

» From the original in (he Registry of the University, Vol. xxxiii. 2. 59. 



42 May print AlmatMcks, Bibles, Prayer-Books 



j^tSJjtos them by the order of this Board of the 10**» of Decemb: 1623, for the 
books in printing and selling of such Bookes as are therein conteyned, which 



BlUe. 



St mS^ T!^^ the Vniuersitie of Cambridge (besides the benefitt allowed vnto 
pdaxmAM 

and Pmyer 

books in ^ ^ ^ _ . ^ ^ 

with the benefitt is by this order entirely reserued vnto them) shall likewise 
en?and tiM bau6 libertie to comprint with the Kings printers, and the Stationers 
SfLtSStt. ^^ London by their Printers from hence forward for euer, English 
Bibles in such Volumes as are now in hand in the sayd Vniuersitie, 
viz. in Quarto, and the Median ffolio, without Restraint of any number 
or sorte of letter togeither with the Letoui^gie of the same Volumes 
in the beginning of the Bookes contayneing the Booke of Common 
Prayer and the Psalmes vsually read in the Church, and the Collects 
for the day, and a Titularie Referrence to the new Testament of the 
Epistles and Gosples appoynted for the day ; and in the end of the 
sayd Bibles the singing Psalmes. 
The ^We Provided that the sayd Printers of the Vniuersitie, shall not print 

witboat the any more of the sayd Letourgies, and singing psalmes, then will scrue 
BcS%' to bee joyned with the Bibles allowed to bee printed by them ; and 

^S» prouided that though the sayd Printers shall sell any of the sayd 
Bibles without the said Letoui^es, or singing psalms joyned with them, 
yet it shall not bee Lawfull for the sayd Printers to sell any of the sayd 
Letoui^es or singing psalmes a parte. And it is further ordered by 
LiUie'B the Boord, and agreed by the sayd parties, that the sayd Printers 

granimar. ^^ ^^ Uniuersitie of Cambridge, may print every yeare hence- 
forward for euer three thousand Lillies Qrammers and noe more in 
one yeare. 
S*" *TS oi ^^^ ^^ ^ further ordered and agreed that the sayd Printers shall 

boolu roed- not printe the sayd Bibles in any other Volume, nor any other Booke 
only. conteyned within the Patents of Priuilego granted to the Kings 

Printers, or to the Corporacion of Stationers other then such as arc 
expressed in this order, or in the order of the Board of the 10^^ of 
Decemb: 1623 : notwithstanding any Charter, Lettres Patentes, Decree, 
order, Report or prouision whatsoeuer. 
Thisorder to And for the auoydiug of all further controuersie, it is ordered that 
in the BegiB- this order shall be entered in the Register Booke of the Acts of the 
GoQncU.and Councell, and that as well the Vice Chancellor and Printer of the sayd 
& ■ii'tG** Universitie and other Members thereof present at the Debate as alsoe 
Jj;^^ the sayd Printers to his Majesty and the Master Wardens and other 
Members of the Corporacion of Stationers present hereat shall sett 
their hands to this order entered in the Councell Booka 
£L^' ^^ ^ ^^ ordered and agreed that it shall be Lawfull for the Printers 

nieofaU of the said Universitie, to finish those Grammers, Accidentes, and 
ttamAj Prinmaers, which were in their Presses and alreadie b^xmne, before 
this day of heareing, and as well those Bookes, as all other Bookes 
which they have ah^eadie finished freely to sell and vtter, soe as the 
sayd Vice Chancellor and Printer of Cambridge doe give in a note to 
bee entered with this order both of the sorts and the nomber of the 



Preferment annexed to Professorships 43 

aayd Bookes alreadie printed, now remaining in their hands or which 
are now in printing. 

And it is lastly ordered that both his Majesty's Printers, and the Bookaj^rint- 
Company of Stationers shall euer hereafter vtterly forbeare to seize any Univenibr 
of the sayd Bookes or any other Booke or Bookes, or any parte thereof SeSwd.^ 
which shall bee printed by the Printers of the sayd Vniuersitie, accord- 
ing to this order, or otherwise to molest or hinder them in the Sale 
thereof. And that as well his Majesty's Printers as the Company of 
Stationers, shall make present Restitution to the sayd Vniuersitie 
Printers of whatsoeuer of their Bookes they haue seized since the fore- 
named order of this Board of the lO^'* of December 1623: Provided 
that if eyther of the sayd parties, or those that hereafter shall enjoy 
their right, shall breake this present order, or the order of the lO*** of 
Decemb: 1623, the partie so breaking the said orders or any parte of 
them, shall vtterly loose all benefitt which they might receaue by the 
sayd orders, but the sayd orders shall stand good to all other intents 
and purposes ^ 



9. An Act for confirming and rendering more 

EFFECTUAL CERTAIN LETTERS PATENTS OF KiNG JaMES 

THE First for annexing a Canonry and several 
Rector YES to the Regius Professor of Divinity in 
THE University of Oxford and to the Regius 
Professor and Lady Margaret's Reader of 
Divinity in the University of Cambridge. 

10 Anne. Ch. xlv. 22 May, 1712. 

Whereas our most gracious Soveraign King James the First of Reduiof 
blessed memory, for the support and maintenance of the Regius Patent of 
Professor or Reader of Divinity in the University of Oxford, did by his 3 Jamoft 
Letters Patent^ bearing date the twenty sixth day of August in the ^*3a*"^*' 
third year of his Reign, grant to the Chancellor Masters and Schollars 
of the said University of Oxford and their successors all that his 
advowson donation free disposition and right of patronage of the 
Rectory of Newelme alias Ewelme in the county of Oxford, and the 
said late King James the First by the said Letters Patent did for 
himself his heires and successors grant to the said Chancellor Masters 
and Schollars of the said University and their successors, that the said 
Regius Professor for the time being for ever should have and enjoy one 
Prebend or Canonry within the Cathedral Church of Christ in Oxford 
of the foundation of King Henry the Eighth, so long as he should be 
R^iLs Professor of Divinity in that University : and whereas the said 

1 From the original in the Registry of the University, Vol. xxxiii. 2. 78. 



44 



Preferment annexed to 



TheCanonry 
of Chrigt 
Church and 
the several 
Bectories 
herein 
mentioned, 
united to 
the said 
several 
offloea. 



King James the FirHt, for the encrease of the stipend of the Regiiis 
Professor or Reader of Divinity in the University of Cambridge, did 
by other his Letters Patent of the same date grant to the Chancellor 
Masters and Schollars of the said University of Cambridge and their 
successors all that his adyowson donation free disposition and right of 
patronage of the Rectory of Somersham (together with Colne and 
Pidley and other Chappelryes rights members and appurtenances) in 
the county of Huntington ; and whereas the said King James the First 
(for the encrease of the stipend of the Reader of the Lecture of 
Divinity appointed by Margaret Countess of Richmond mother of King 
Henry the Seventh in the said University of Cambridge) did also by the 
said Letters Patent grant to the Chancellor Masters and Schollars of the 
said University of Cambridge and their successors all that his advowson 
donation free disposition and right of patronage of the Rectory of 
Terington in the County of Norfolk with all it's rights members and 
appurtenances : and wheras the said King James the First in and by 
the said several Letters Patent did signify and declare it to be his 
royal will and pleasure, that the said Canonry and several Rectoryes 
should for ever thereafter be held and enjoyed by the said several 
Professors and Reader of the Lecture aforesaid for so long time as thoy 
respectively should continue in the said respective offices or places, 
and did thereby fiuther signify and declare his royal will and intention 
to be that one or more Act or Acts of Parliament should be obtained 
for that purpose, which hath never yet been done : 

May it therefore please your Majesty that it may be enacted, and 
be it enacted by the Queens most excellent Majesty by and with the 
advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal and Comons 
in this present Parliament assembled and by the authority of the same, 
that the said Canonry of Christ Church and several Rectoryes of 
Newelme alias Ewelme Somersham and Terington and every of them, 
and all members tythes lands tenements hereditaments profitts and 
emoluments whatsoever to them and every of them respectively 
belonging or in any wise appertaining, or with the said Canonry and 
Rectoryes every or any of them used or enjoyed, are and shall hereby 
be united and for ever annexed unto the several offices or places 
aforesaid, and shall be held and enjoyed by the respective persons 
already placed in the said offices or places, and by such other person and 
persons as shall from time to time for ever hereafter be placed and put 
into the said offices or places, in as full and ample manner to all intents 
and purposes as if they were duly presented nominated admitted 
instituted and inducted thereunto. And the said respective Professors 
and Reader of the said Lecture and their successors for the time being, 
during such time and times only as they shall continue in their 
respective offices or places, shall by vertue of such office or place for 
ever hereafter enjoy the said respective Canonry and also shall have 
and hold the said Rectoryes without any presentation admission 



Professorships of Divinity 45 

institution or induction or any other act or thing whatsoever to en- 
title them thereunto ; and shall be and are hereby declared to be 
(during their continuance in the said respective offices or places) full 
and perfect Canon and Incumbents of the respective Canonry and 
Rectoryes aforesaid to all intents and purposes whatsoever : which 
nevertheless shall not be so imderstood as to make void any other 
benefice or benefices which the said Professors and Reader of the said 
Lecture or any of them is at present or shall hereafter be legally 
possessed of; it being the intention of this Act, that the aforesaid 
Rectoryes shall consist and be held and enjoyed by the said Professors 
and Reader of the said Lecture respectively together with any one 
other ecclesiastical benefice, without any lycence or dispensation for 
that end to be granted or obtained. 

2. And it is hereby further enacted and declared, that, as often as The said 

it shall happen that any of the said offices or places shall become ReStoriL'?o 
void by death resignation or otherwise, the Canonry and Rectoryes Snjoy«i*by* 
or the Rectory to such office or place respectively belonging shall Sid^offloes** 
at the same time become void, and the person that shall be placed ^°^y- 
in such office or place so become void shall, by vertue of such office or 
place only, have and enjoy the Canonry and Rectoryes or the Rectory 
to such office or place belonging for so long time as he shall continue 
in such office or place and no longer. 

3. Provided always, that the said Professors shall celebrate Divine The Profen- 
Service and performe all other parochial dutyes relating to the cure of th"dutv°of 
souls within the said several Rectoryes which any other Rectors of the Mver^ 
said Rectoryes have heretofore done and performed and were by law *«^*orieB. 
obliged to do and performe, or shall allow to learned and able Curates 

(to be lycenced by the Bishop or Ordinary of the diocess), who shall 
be constantly residing within the said Rectoryes, such competent 
salaries and stipends as the said Bishop or Ordinary shall judge 
sufficient. 

4. Provided also, that neither this Act nor any thing therein The Pro- 
contained shall excuse or be construed to excuse the said Professors or h^by ex^ 
Reader of the Lecture aforesaid or any of them from the payment of SJing"*™ 
first fruits and tenths, or from the payment of all dues of what kind JjJti^i^ 
soever to the Bishop or other Ordinary who before the making this other clues, 
Act had lawfiill right to claime the same, or from canonical obedience canonical 
to the Bishop or Ordinary of their respective diocesses ; but every such 
Professor and Reader of the said Lecture shall be obliged to make 
payment thereof i. 

> See EnactmenU^ nt supra, p. 52. 



46 Whitehall Preachers 

10. Preachers at Whitehall. 

The following notice appeared in the London Odzette, 
March 17— March 21, 1723 (1723-4). 

St Jame^Sj March 20 
His Majesty has been graciously pleased to order and appoint^ that 
the Duty of Preaching in his Chapel at Whitehall be henceforth 
performed by Twenty Four Persons who are Fellows of CoUeges in the 
two Universities (viz. Twelve out of each University, two of them for 
every Month, to be recommended to His Majesty by the Dean of His 
Majesty's Chapel) and that a salary of Thirty Pounds a Year be paid 
to each Person, for his Attendance on the said Duty ; the first Sermon 
to be preached on Sunday the 5th Day of April next, being fiaster- 
Day. 

In 1837 the number of Preachers was reduced to two^ ; 
and since 1890 no appointment has been made. 

11. An Act for enabling the two Universities in 
England, the four Universities in Scotland, and 
the several Colleges of Eton, Westminster, and 
Winchester, to hold in Perpetuity their Copy 
Right in Books given or bequeathed To the said 
Universities and Colleges for the Advancement 
OF USEFUL Learning and other purposes of Edu- 
cation. 

15 Geo. III. Cap. 53. 22 May, 1776. 

Preamble. Whereas authors have heretofore bequeathed or given, and may 

hereafter bequeath or give, the copies of books composed by them to 
or in trust for one of the two Universities in that part of Great Britain 
called England, or to or in trust for some of the Colleges or Houses of 
Learning within the same, or to or in trust for the four Universities in 
Scotland, or to or in trust for the several Colleges of Eaton, West- 
minster, and Winchester ; and in and by th^ir several wills or other 
instruments of donation have directed or may direct, that the profits 
arising from the printing and reprinting such books shall be applied or 
appropriated as a fund for the advancement of learning and other 
beneficial purposes of education within the said Universities and 
Colleges aforesaid: and whereas such useful purposes will frequently 
be frustrated, unless the sole printing and reprinting of such books, 
the copies of which have been or shall be so bequeathed or given as 

^ See Cooper*a AnnaUt iv. 182. 



Eights of Copyright and printing 47 

aforesaid, be preserved and secured to the said Universities, Colleges, 
and Houses of Learning respectively in perpetuity : may it therefore 
please your Majesty that it may be enacted, and be it enacted by the 
King's most excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of 
the Lords spiritual and temporal and Commons in this present 
Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, that the said Jyjj^^ j^ 
Universities and Colleges respectively shall, at their respective presses, £j^1^** 
have for ever the sole liberty of printing and reprinting all such books haye, for 
as shall at any time heretofore have been, or (having not been hereto- aoie'BUrht 
fore published or assigned) shall at any time hereafter be, bequeathed Aaraoh^ 
or otherwise given by the author or authors of the same respectively, hi?rebeeD, 
or the representatives of such author or authors, to or in trust for the SJ^SjJthSi 
said Universities, or to or in trust for any College or House of Learn- g S'«> 
ing within the same, or to or in trust for the said four Universities 
in Scotland, or to or in trust for the said Colleges of Eaton, West- 
minster, and Winchester, or any of them, for the purposes aforesaid, 
unless the same shall have been bequeathed or given, or shall hereafter Jj^^j^® 
be bequeathed or given, for any term of years or other limited term ; ^J*^ 
any law or usage to the contrary hereof in any- wise notwithstanding ^ given for 



12. An Act for granting to his Majesty an additional 
Duty upon Almanacks printed on one side of any 
ONE Sheet or piece of Paper ; and for allowing a 
certain annual sum out of the said duty to each 
of the universities of oxford and cambridge, in 
lieu of the money heretofore paid to the said 
Universities by the Company of Stationers of the 
City of London for the Privilege of printing 
Almanacks. 

21 Geo. III. Cap. 66. 5 July, 178L 

10. And whereas the power of granting a liberty to print Almanacks Proamble. 
and other books was heretofore supposed to be an inherent right in the 
Crown ; and whereas the Crown hath, by different charters under the 
great Seal, granted to the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, 
among other things, the privilege of printing Almanacks ; and whereas 
the Universities did demise to the Company of Stationers of the City 
of London their privileges of printing and vending Almanacks and 
Calendars, and have received an annual siun of one thousand pounds 
and upwards as a consideration for such privilege; and whereas the 
money so received by them has been laid out and expended in 
promoting different branches of literature and science, to the great 
increase of religion and learning, and the general benefit and advantage 
of these realms ; and whereas the privilege or right of printing Alma- 
> See EnactmenUf nt supra, p. 84. 



48 Rights of Copyright and printing 



Out of the 
Duties 

there shall 
he paid 
£500 a year 
to the Uni- 
versity of 
Oxford, and 
£500 to Cam- 
bridge ; 



to be paid 
half-yearly, 
at Mid- 
summer and 
Christmas. 



nacks has been, by a late decision at law, found to have been a common 
right, over which the Crown had no controul, and consequently the 
Universities no power to demise the same to any particular person or 
body of men, whereby the paynoents so made to them by the Company 
of Stationers have ceased and been discontinued : be it therefore 
enacted by the authority aforesaid, that, from and after the twenty- 
fourth day of June one thousand seven hundred and eighty-one, there 
shall be issued, paid, and applied, in every year, out of the monies 
which shall arise by the duty hereinbefore granted, the sums of money 
following to the two Universities of Oxford and Cambridge ; that is to 
say, the sum of five hundred pounds to the University of Oxford, and 
the sum of five himdred pounds to the University of Cambridge ; which 
said several and respective sums of money shall be and are hereby 
charged upon the duty herein-before granted, and shall be paid there- 
out yearly and every year, at the two usual feasts, that is to say, the 
Feast of the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist, and the Birth of our 
Lord Christ ; the first payment to be made, on the Feast of the Birth 
of our Lord Christ after passing this Act, by the Receiver General of 
his Majesty's Stamp-duties, free and clear of all fees, dues, duties, 
taxes, and deductions whatsoever, unto the Chancellors Masters and 
Scholars of the said Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, and to bo 
received by the hands of the Vice -Chancellor of each University 
respectively, or by some person or persons duly authorized by each 
respective Vice-Chancellor under his hand to receive the same, to and 
for the sole use and benefit of each of the said Universities ; and the 
receipt of the Vice-Chancellor of each University, or of the person or 
|)ersons duly authorized as aforesaid by him to receive the same, shall 
be a sufficient receipt to the said Receiver General of the Stamp-duties, 
and shall be allowed by the Aiiditor and Auditors of the Imprest, and 
all other persons concerned in passing his accounts, as a JPiiU and 
sufficient discharge for the making such payments out of the aforesaid 
dutyi. 



13. An Act to amend the law op Copyright. 
5 AND 6 Vict. Cap. 45. 1 July, 1842. 



A copy of 
every hook 
to be de- 
livered 
witblna 
month after 
demand to 
the Officer 
of the 8ta- 



8. And be it enacted, that a copy of the whole of every book, and 
of any second or subsequent edition of every book containing additions 
and alterations, together with all maps and prints belonging thereto, 
which after the passing of this Act shall be published, shall, on demand 
thereof in writing, left at the place of abode of the publisher thereof 

1 See Enactmenttf at supra, p. 92. This grant is confirmed by 44 Oeo. 3, 
0. 98 (a Stamp Act), by the following words in Schedule (C.) under 
"Allowances'': "To the two UniverBities of Oxford and Cambridge 
respectively, the annual earn of £500 each." 



Rights of copyright 49 

at any time within twelve months next after the publication thereof, *[2J5jS*Se 
under the hand of the Officer of the Company of Stationers who shall ^Jj*. 
from time to time be appointed by the said Company for the pm-poses theBodieiui 
of this Act, or under the hand of any other person thereto authorized the Public 
by the persons er bodies politic and corporate, proprietors and CBm^<4^ 
managers of the Libraries following, {videlicet^) the Bodleian Library rSofSl^ 
at Oxford, the Public Library at Cambridge, the Library of the ^SffiSSSh** 
Faculty of Advocates at Edinburgh, the Library of the College of the gj^{f**°' 
Holy and Undivided Trinity of Queen Elizabeth near Dublin, be g>"3g» 
delivered, upon the paper of which the largest number of copies of 
such book or edition shall be printed for sale, in the like condition as 
the copies prepared for sale by the publisher thereof respectively, 
within one month after demand made thereof in writing as aforesaid, 
to the said Officer of the said Company of Stationers for the time 
being ; which copies the said Officer shall and he is hereby required to 
receive at the Hall of the said Company for the use of the Library for 
which such demand shall be made within such twelve months as 
aforesaid ; and the said Officer is hereby required to give a receipt in 
writing for the same, and, within one month after any such book shall 
be so delivered to him as aforesaid, to deliver the same for the use of 
such Library. 

9. Provided also, and be it enacted, that if any publisher shall be ^^'Jft?" 
desirous of delivering the copy of such book as shall be demanded on the copies 
behalf of any of the said Libraries at such Library, it shall be lawful brariee, in- 
for him to deliver the same at such Library, free of expence, to such stationen' 
Librarian or other person authorized to receive the same (who is ^*"* 
hereby required in such case to receive and give a receipt in writing 

for the same), and such delivery shall to all intents and purposes of 
this Act be held as equivalent to a delivery to the said Officer of the 
Stationers Company. 

10. And be it enacted, that if any publisher of any such book, or Penally for 
of any second or subsequent edition of any such book, shall neglect to delivering 
deliver the same, pursuant to this Act, he shall for every such default Sheim^'the 
forfeit, besides the value of such copy of such book or edition which he ^**™^«* 
ought to have delivered, a sum not exceeding five pounds, to be 
recovered by the Librarian or other Officer (properly authorized) of the 
Library for the use whereof such copy should have been delivered, in 

a summary way, on conviction before two Justices of the Peace for the 
coimty or place where the publisher making default shall reside, or by 
action of debt or other proceeding of the like nature, at the suit of 
such Librarian or other Officer, in any Court of Hecord in the United 
Kingdom, in which action, if the plaintiff shall obtain a verdict, he 
shall recover his costs reasonably incurred, to be taxed as between 
attorney and client. 

27. Provided always, and be it enacted, that nothing in this Act MS?orSi« 
contained shall affect or alter the rights of the two Universities of uniyeni- 
C. 4 



60 Severance of SomersJiam Rectory 

u«L and ttie Oxford and Cambridge, the Colleges or Houses of Learning within the 
Eton. West- same, the four Universities in Scotland, the College of the Holy and 
Winchester. Undivided Trinity of Queen Elizabeth near Dublin, and the several 
Colleges of Eton, Westminster, and Winchester, in any copyrights 
heretofore and now vested or hereafter to be vested in such Universities 
and Colleges repectively, any thing to the contrary herein contained 
notwithstanding \ 



14. An Act for disannexing the Rectory of Somersham 

from the Office of Regius Professor of Divinity in the 

University of Cambridge, and for making better provision 

for the Cure of Souls within the said Rectory; and for 

oiher purposes, \Sth August, 1882. 

PreambieL Whereas His late Majesty King James the First, for the increase 

of the stipend of the regius professor or reader of divinity in the 
University of Cambridge, did by his Letters Patent bearing date the 
twenty-sixth day of August, in the third year of his reign, grant to 
the chancellor, masters, and scholars of the said University of Cam- 
bridge and their successors all that his advowson, donation, free 
disposition, and right of patronage of the Rectory of Somersham 
(together with Colne and Pidley, and other chapelries, rights, members, 
and appurtenances) in the county of Huntingdon, and did by the same 
Letters Patent signify and declare it to be his royal wiU and pleasure 
that the said rectory should for ever thereafter be held and enjoyed 
by the said professor for so long time as he should continue in the said 
office, and did thereby further signify and declare his royal wiU and 
intention to be that an Act of Parliament should bo obtained for that 
purpose : 
Act of And whereas by an Act passed in the tenth year of Her late 

(MeaboTor^ Majesty Queen Anne for, amongst other things, confirming and 
^ ^^ rendering more effectual the said Letters Patent, it was enacted that 

the canonry and rectories in the said Act mentioned should be annexed 
to the offices or places also in the said Act mentioned, namely, among 
others, that the said Kectory of Somersham, and all members, tithes, 
lands, tenements, hereditaments, profits, and emoluments whatsoever 
thereto belonging, or in anywise appertaining, or with the same used 
or enjoyed, was and should thereby be imited and for ever annexed 
unto the said office or place of regius professor of divinity, and should 
be held and enjoyed by the person already placed in the said office 
or place ; and by such other person or persons as should from time to 

1 See EfULCtmenU, ut supra, p. 187. This Act repeals the Acts passed for 
a similar purpose 8 Anne, cap. 21 (5 April, 1710) ; and 54 Geo. IH, cap. 156 
(29 July, 1814). Cooper's AnnaU, iv. 651. 



from Profeasorahip of Divinity 61 

time for ever thereafter be placed and put into the said office or place in 
as full and ample manner to all intents and purposes as if they were 
duly presented, nominated, admitted, instituted, and inducted there- 
unto ; and the said professor or reader and his successors for the time 
being, during such time or times only as they should continue in the 
said office or place, should by virtue of such office or place for ever 
thereafter have and hold the said rectory without any presentation, 
admission, institution, or induction, or any other act or thing what- 
soever to entitle them thereunto, and should be and were thereby 
declared to be during their continuance in the said office or place fiill 
and perfect incumbents of the said rectory to all intents and purposes 
whatsoever ; and that so often as it should happen that the said office 
or place should become void by death, resignation, or otherwise, the 
said rectory should at the same time become void, and the person that 
should be placed in such office or place so become void should by 
virtue of such office or place only have and enjoy the said rectory for 
so long time as he should continue in such office or place and no 
longer: And it was thereby provided that the said professor should 
celebrate divine service and perform all other parochial duties relating 
to the cure of souls within the said rectory which any other rector of 
the said rectory had theretofore done and performed, and were by law 
obliged to do and perform, or should allow to learned and able curates 
to be licensed by the bishop or ordinary of the diocese who should be 
constantly residing within the said rectory such competent salaries 
and stipends as the said bishop or ordinary should judge sufficient : 
And it was thereby also provided that neither that Act nor anything 
therein contained should excuse or be construed to excuse the said 
professor from the payment of first fruits and tenths, or from the 
payment of all dues of what kind soever to the bishop or other ordinary 
who before the making of that Act had lawful right to claim the same, 
or from canonical obedience to the bishop or ordinary of the said 
diocese, but siich professor should be obliged to make payment 
thereof : 

And whereas it has been found that by reason of the duties Begins pro- 
belonging to his office of professor the said regius professor is unable not perfonn 
to celebrate divine service and to perform in person the other parochial SSS/*^ 
duties relating to the cure of souls within the said rectory, and it is 
expedient that the said regius professor should devote himself entirely 
to the duties of his office of professor, and that divine service should be 
celebrated and all other parochial duties performed within the said 
rectory by some person appointed for that purpose with permanence 
of tenure : 

Be it therefore enacted by the Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by 
and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, 
and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the 
authority of the same, as follows : 

4—2 



52 Severance of Somersham Rectory 

Short tttie. 1. This Act may be cited for all purposeB as the Somersham 

Rectory Act, 1882. 

SSnfofAcL ^' '^^ ^^^ ^^^^ commence and take effect from and after the 
time of the next and first avoidance of the office or place (in this Act 
called the office) of regius professor or reader of divinity in the 
University of Cambridge (in this Act called regius professor) which 
shall happen after the passing of this Act, or from and after any earlier 
time at which the person holding at the time of the passing of this 
Act the office of regius professor shall, by writing under his hand 
addressed and sent to the chancellor, masters, and scholars of the 
University of Cambridge (in this Act called the chancellor, masters, 
and scholars), and also to the bishop or ordinary of the diocese, resign 
the Rectory of Somersham, in the county of Huntingdon; and the 
person so holding the office of regius professor is by this Act authorised 
to resign the same rectory accordingly ¥rithout resigning the office of 
regius professor. 

Bectonr of 3. Immediately after the commencement of this Act the Rectory 

Somonhain 

to be dlMm- of Somersham (in this Act called the rectory), together with Colne and 

raginapro- Pidley, and other chapelries, rights, members, and appurtenances, in 

^'^ ^' the county of Huntingdon, and all members, tithes, lands, tenements, 

hereditaments, profits, and emoluments whatsoever belonging or in 

anywise appertaining to that rectory or with the same used or enjoyed 

(all of which are in this Act included under the expression the rectory), 

shaU be severed and for ever disannexed from the office of regius 

professor ; and the person who shall after the commencement of this 

Act be the regius professor for the time being shaU no longer by 

virtue of his office have or hold the rectory or become the incimibent 

thereof. 

Bactorr 4 After the commencement of this Act the rectory and all the 

TMtedinthe 

UoiTenltj estate and interest therein which the regius professor as rector thereof 

bridga or his successors has or had, or would have had therein if this Act had 

not been passed, shall, without any conveyance thereof or any assurance 
in law other than the provisions of this Act, forthwith become and be 
vested in the chancellor, masters, and scholars for ever for the purposes 
and subject to the provisions of this Act, and the chancellor, masters, 
and scholars shall for ever thenceforth receive all the tithes, rents, 
profits, and emoluments payable in respect of the rectory to the rector 
thereof for the time being. 
Ui^mity 5. After the commencement of this Act the chancellor, masters, 

powwi of and scholars shall, for the purpose of enforcing payment of all tithes, 
rents, profits, and emoluments of the rectory, and of obtaining pos- 
session of all tithes, lands, tenements, and other hereditaments 
becoming vested in them under this Act, and of recovering the rents 
and profits thereof, have and enjoy all rights, powers, and remedies at 
law and in equity of a rector of the rectory duly presented and 
instituted or collated and inducted thereto. 



nctor. 



from Professorship of Divinity 63 

6. After the commencement of this Act neither the r^us professor Neither pro- 
for the time being nor the chancellor, masters, and scholars shall be nniToAtfto 
required, nor shaU it be lawful for him or them by virtue of the office SScOi.*''^ ^ 
of regius professor or of rector of the rectory, to celebrate divine service 

or perform any other parochial duties relating to the cure of souls 
within the rectory, or to appoint any curate or curates for such 
purposes or any of them, and neither the regius professor for the time 
being nor the chancellor, masters, and scholars shall owe any canonical 
obedience to the bishop or ordinary of the diocese within which the 
rectory is or may be situated. 

7. After the conmiencemont of this Act there shall by virtue of vi«»ge 
this Act be constituted a vicarage of Somersham (in this Act called with ctm of 
the vicarage), and for the purpose of celebrating divine service and 
performing all other parochial duties relating to the cure of souIb 

within the rectory there shall be appointed a duly qualified clerk to 
be the vicar of Somersham (in this Act called the vicar), who shaU 
celebrate divine service and perform all other parochial duties relating 
to the cure of souls within the rectory which the regius professor as 
rector of the rectory, or the curate or curates appointed by him, has 
or have usually done or performed, or was or were by law obliged to 
do or perform, and the vicar shall owe canonical obedience to the 
bishop or ordinary of the diocese within which the rectory is or may 
be situated. 

8. The perpetual advowson, donation, firee disposition, and right o**jSSi 
of patronage of the vicarage shall be and the same is by this Act ZfJ^'^ 
vested in the bishop or ordinary of the diocese, who shall from time to diooeBo. 
time collate some fit and proper person to the vicarage. 

9. After the commencement of this Act the chancellor, masters, ^J^^i^ 
and scholars shall out of the tithes, rents, profits, and emoluments of w!^J)l!^^ 
the rectory pay all expenses, charges, and other outgoings, including ragiiu 
the costs of repairing the chancel of the parish church of Somersham and Ticar. 
and of the two churches in Colne and Pidley, at any time before the 
passing of this Act paid by the regius professor as rector, other than 

the salaries or stipends of any cui*ates appointed for the celebration of 
divine service and the performance of other parochial duties relating 
to the cure of souls within the rectory, and shall divide the net annual 
surplus of such tithes, rents, profits, and emoluments, after payment 
thereout of all such outgoings as aforesaid, into twenty equal parts, 
and shall pay ten of such parts to the regius professor for the time 
being, and shall pay the remaining ten of such parts to the vicar for 
the time being for the benefit of himself and of his two curates as 
hereinafter provided. 

10. The vicar shall appoint and constantly provide at least two vicar *o em- 
learned and able curates (to be duly licensed by the bishop or ordinary onratos. 

of the diocese), who shall be resident within the rectory, to assist him 
in the celebration of divine service, and the performance of all other 



64 Severance of Somersham Rectory 

parochial duties relating to the cure of souls within the rectory, and 
the vicar shall in every year, out of the income represented by the ten 
parts to be paid to him as by this Act provided of the said annual 
surplus, pay and apply three of such parts to the curate assigned to 
Pidley and two other such parts to the curate assigned to Colne. 
Vtourtohftye n. The vicar shall by virtue of his office of vicar have, hold, 
houM. occupy, and enjoy for his own use, so long as he continues vicar, the 

rectory house at Somersham, and the garden and ground belonging 
thereto and usually occupied therewith. 
Vicar to be 12, Every vicar of Somersham shall have all such claims, rights, 

fordiUpidA- remedies, and powers of recovery against the rector or vicar his 
predecessor, or against the representatives of the rector or vicar his 
predecessor, in respect of dilapidations to the rectory house, garden, 
and ground as would have belonged to or been possessed by the person 
succeeding to the office of r^us professor against his predecessor in 
that office, or against the representatives of such predecessor, if this 
Act had not been passed. 
Fint fmits 13. All first fruits and other dues which before the passing of this 

on ooSaUon^ Act have been payable in respect of the rectory upon the appointment 
° ^*'' of any person to the office of r^us professor shall after the commence- 
ment of this Act become due and be payable upon the collation of 
a vicar to the vicarage, and first fruits or other dues shall no longer 
become due or be payable in respect of the rectory upon the appoint- 
ment of any person to the office of regius professor. 
FixBt fruits 14. The chancellor, masters, and scholars shall out of the tithes, 

outoFroc- rents, profits, and emoluments received by them as rectors of the 
tory income. j.g^j^jpy pg^y ^ fijg^^ fruits and tenths, and payments so made shall be 
outgoings within the meaning of this Act payable before the division 
by this Act directed to be made of the net annual surplus of the 
tithes, rents, profits, and emoluments of the rectory. 
Provision M 15. All costs of or incident to preparing, obtaining, and passing 
thie Act this Act shall be paid by the chancellor, masters, and scholars. 



III. 

FOUNDATIONS WITH MORE 
THAN ONE OBJECT 



Benefa/stions of the Lady Margaret 67 



1. Benefactions of the Lady Margaret^ 
1502—1604. 

(a) Readership or Professorship in Divinity. 
(6) Preachership. 

Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Richmond and Derby, 
mother of King Henry the Seventh, founded a Readership 
or Professorship in Divinity {Lectura perpetua uniua ledoris 
perpetui sacre iheoloffie); and also a Preachership (Camtaria 
perpetua vnius predicatoris verbi de%)\ She obtained a 
license to found the former 10 December 1496, but did not 
complete the foundation until 1502, when by deed, dated 
8 September (A), she declares the Readership to be estab- 
lished, prescribes statutes, and appoints John Fisher, D.D., to 
be the first Reader. The licence to found the Preachership 
is dated 7 February, 1504, and her own deed of foundation 
(B) 30 October, 1504, in which John Fawne, B.D., is nomi- 
nated the first Preacher, and statutes are prescribed. The 
stipends of both the Professor and the Preacher are to be 
paid by the Abbot of S. Peter's, Westminster, out of the 
revenues of certain lands conveyed to him by the Countess 
for that purpose. The deeds providing for these stipends 
are dated respectively 1 July, 1503 (C), and 6 November, 
1605 (D). After the dissolution of the monastery both 
stipends were continued by decrees of the Court of Augmenta- 
tions, confirmed by letters patent of King Henry the Eighth, 
dated respectively 26 June and 16 June, 1542 (E, F). 

King James the First, by letters patent, dated 6 August, 
1605, granted to the University the Rectory of Terrington 
in Norfolk, for the augmentation of the revenue of the Lady 
Margaret's Professorship ^ This grant was not confirmed by 
Act of Parliament until the 10th year of the reign of Queen 
Anne (1711—12). It received the royal assent 22 May, 17121 

^ See Memoir of Margaret, Counter of Richmond and Derby, By G. H. 
Cooper. Svo. Camb. 1874 ; and Funeral Sermon of Margaret [etc.] preaohed 
by Bishop Fisher in 1609. Ed. J. Hymers, B.D. 8vo. Camb. 1840. 

* Bee above, p. 38. > See above, p. 48. 



68 Befnefaetums of the Lady Margaret 

In 1625 Mrs Alice Davers, widow of Jeremy Davers, M.A., 
conveyed to Samuel Ward, D.D., then Lady Margaret's 
Reader, and to his successors for ever, a " garden, place, or 
parcel of ground " in S. Eldward's parish, on the south side of 
Bene't Street, for reasons which are set forth at length in 
the conveyance (G)^. 

In 1856 an oflFer made by the Rev. William Selwyn, B.D., 
elected Reader 29 June, 1855, to give £700 a year to 
augment the salary of the Norrisian Professorship, so long 
as he and the then Norrisian Professor retained their offices, 
was accepted by Grace (14 May); and the principle was 
embodied in a statute which was accepted by Grace, 
26 November, 1857. This statute, with a new statute for 
the Readership, was approved by the Queen in Council, 
1 August, 18601 

In 1679 King Charles the Second sent a letter to the 
University, excusing the preacher from the sermons pre- 
scribed by the Foundress to be delivered in places other 
than the University (H). 

A new statute for the Preacher, framed by the Council 
of the Senate, was accepted by Grace 10 December, 1857, and 
approved by the Queen in Council, 6 April, 1868^ 



Foundation of a Readership in Divinity, with statutes 
for the same, 8 September, 1502. 



) of In Dei nomine Amen. Cum exoellentissimus Rex Henricus septi- 

SSSSd*°° niua, dei gratia rex Anglie et Francie et Dominus Hibemie de gracia 
loDea 149«. ^^^^ speciali ac ex oerta scientia et mero motu suis per literas suas 

1 Soon afterwards (16 Dec. 1625) she surrendered to the University her 
interest in the house opposite, formerly Mere*s, in order that the UniTersity 
might let it to the Lady Margaret's Beader. A lease of it for 99 years was 
accordingly granted to Samuel Ward, D.D. on the same day, in order, as the 
document sets forth, that he **and his successors Readers of the said 
Diwity Lectures for the time being may be allwaies hereafter provided of a 
fitt and convenient house wherein he and they may inhabit and dwell during 
the time that he and they respectively shall continue to be Readers of the 
said Lectures.*' 

3 Statutes of the Uvivenity, ed. 1896, pp. 86, 86. 

s Ibid. p. 106. 



Readership in Divinity 59 

patentees qnarum datum est apud Westmonasterium decimo die 
Decembris aoDO regni »ui duodecimo, conoesserit et licentiam dederit 
nobis Margarete Comitisse Richmond' matri eiusdem domini regis et 
executoribus noetris, quod noe prefata Comitissa vel executores nostri 
seu nostrum aliquis vel aliqui vnam lecturam perpetuam vnius lectoris 
perpetui sacra tbeologie ad laudem et honorem sancte et individue 
Trinitatis ac fidei Christianorum augmentum, necnon ad nostra auime 
et animarum parantum progenitorum et anteoessorum nostrorum ac 
omnium fidelium defunctorum salutem in vniversitate Cantabr' Elien' 
Diooee' iuxta ordinaciones et statuta nostra vel executorum nostrorum, 
fundare, creara, erigera et stabilire possimus, possit, aut possiut : Et 
quod lectura ilia, cum sic fundata, creata, erecta, et stabilita fuerit, 
lectura sacra Tbeologie per Margaretam Comitissam Richmond' matrem 
regis Henrici septimi in vniversitate Cantabr' fundata nuncupetur: 
Ac quod lector lectura iUius pro tempera existens sit vnum corpus in 
ra et nomine habeatque suooessionem perpetuam: Et quod ipse et 
successores sui per nomen lectoris lectiu*e sacra Tbeologie per Mar- 
garetam Comitissam Richmond' matram r^gis Henrici septimi in 
vniversitate Cantabr* ordinati in omnibus et omnimodis actionibus, 
sectis, causis, querelis et placitis, tam realibus quam personalibus et 
mixtis, ac placitis assise nove disseisine, et in onmibus aliis raateriis 
et causis quibuscunque, in quibuscunque curiis tam spirituallbus quam 
temporalibus, implacitara possint et implacitari, respondera et respon- 
deri, ac per idem nomen perquirere, recipere, appropriare, consolidare, 
annectera et vnire, habera, gaudera et possidere sibi et successoribus 
suis, ac dare et concedera possint terras, tenementa, redditus, rauer- 
siones, servicia, penciones, poraiones, apportus et annuitates, ac 
donationes, hoepitalia, prioratus, liberas capellas, ac alia beneiicia 
ecclesiastica quecunque, necnon omnia et omnimoda haereditamenta 
ac alias posseesiones quascunque ac bona et catalla quecunque praut 
in cisdem Uteris patentibus plenius continetur. 

Noe antedicta Comitissa racione et vigore literarum patentium Byrirtaeor 
predictarum, ac auctoritate nobis per easdem literas patentee conoessa, letten % 
in die et festo nativitatis beate Marie Virginis anno regni dicti domini in DiTinitr 
regis decimo octavo, vnam lecturam perpetuam sacra Tbeologie vnius iTsept uos 
lectoris perpetui in dicta vniversitate Cantabr', videlicet in domo 
communis schole sacra tbeologie ibidem, erigimus, creamus, fundamus Titte. 
et stabUimus per presentes, et lecturam illam lecturam sacra tbeologie 
per Margaretam Comitissam Richmond matrem regis Henrici septimi 
in vniversitate Cantabrig* fimdatam nuncupari, nominari, et vocari 
ordinavimus per presentee. 

£t quondam magistrum Johannem Fyssher, sacre Tbeologie pro- J^J^'SiS 
feesorem, primum lectorem lecturae praedictae, pro vno anno integro ~ ~ 
iam proximo futuro, &cimus creamus, ot ordinamus per presentee. 

> Boi. Pat. 12 Heniy 7, par. 1. Copied by Hare (paper copy), iiL 6. 



60 Beneftictions of the Lady Margaret 



Lend 
ofihe 



Lectaresto 
be free. To 
be delivered 
from 7 a.m. 
to 8a.m. 



To begin on 
the first day 
of each term, 
and to be 
continned 
on eyerr 
dUsUgl- 
bUU. 



To._ 
Lent. 



in 



To be de* 
liyeredin 
LongVaca- 
Uon till 
8 Sept. 



Et quod idem lector habeat successionem perpetuam, quodque 
idem lector et successores sui sint unum corpus in re et nomine ; et 
quod ipse et successores sui per nomen lectoris lecture sacre theologie 
per Maigaretam Comitissam Richmond' matrem regis Henrici septimi 
in vniversitate Cantabr' fimdate, in omnibus et omnimodis actiouibus, 
sectis, causis, querelis et placitis, tarn realibus quam personalibus et 
mixtis, ac placitis assise novo disseisine, et in omnibus aliis materiis 
et causis quibuscunque, in quibuscunque curiis tam spiritualibus quam 
temporalibus, implacitare possint et implacitari, respondere et respon- 
deri, ac per idem nomen perquirere, recipere, appropriare, consolidare, 
aimectere, et imire, habere, gaudere, et possidere sibi et suocessoribus 
suis, ac dare et concedere possint terras, tenementa, redditus, reuer- 
siones, servicia, penciones, porciones, apportus et aunuitates, ac 
advocationes, hospitalia, prioratus, liberas capellas, ac alia beneficia 
ecclesiastica quecunque, nee non omnia et omnimoda hereditamenta 
quecimque, ac alias poasessiones quascunque, ac bona et catalla 
quecunque. 

Volumus insuper et ordinamus per presentes quod predictus lector 
et successores sui lectores lecture predicte leget aut legent in loco et 
scholis predictis, libere, solempniter et aperte cuilibet illuc venienti 
absque aliquo pretio, preterquam ex dono, assignacione et provisione 
nostris pro eodem capiend' talia opera in divinis prout Cancellario aut 
Vioecancellario vniversitatis predicte pro tempore existenti aut eorum 
seu eorum alterius deputato cum coll^o doctorum eiusdem vniversi- 
tatis fore videbitur necessaria et oportuna, circiter vnam horam 
integram, videlicet ab hora septima ante meridiem vsque horam octa- 
vam tunc proximo sequentem, vel per talem horam, qualis dicto 
Cancellario aut Vioecancellario seu eorum vel eorum alterius deputato 
et doctoribus predictis pro tempore presentibus fore videbitur oportuna. 

Et quod dictus lector et quilibet successorum suorum incipiet 
lecturam suam predictam prime die cuiuslibet termini in dicta vni- 
versitate vsitat', et sic continuabit quolibet die legibili accustumato 
vsque ad fiuem cuiuslibet eorundem terminorum, nisi per Cancellarium 
aut Vicecancellarium vniversitatis predicte pro tempore existentem 
seu eorum vel eorum alterius deputatum causa infirmitatis vel alia 
causa rationabili alitor licentiatus fuerit. 

Tamen volumus et ordinamus per presentes quod dictus lector pro 
tempore existens de lectura sua predicta cesset tempore quadragesimali, 
si per Cancellarium aut Vicecancellarium vniversitatis predicte pro 
tempore existentem vel eorum seu eorum alterius deputatum inde 
licientiatus fuerit ea intencione quod ipse et auditores eiusdem lecture 
ad predicandum eodem tempore melius et liberius se disponant 

Et volumus quod dictus lector et quilibet successorum suorum qui 
pro tempore fuerit continuabit lecturam suam predictam annuatim 
quolibet anno in magna vacacione in vniversitate predicta vsitata 
vsque ad festiun Nativitatis beate Marie Viiginis, nisi per Cancellarium 



Readership in Divinity 61 

aut Yioecancellarium vniverBitatis predicte pro tempore existentem vel 
eoram seu eomm alterius deputatum causa infirmitatis vel alia causa 
rationabili alitor vt predicitur lioentiatus fiierit. 

£t vlterius volumus et ordinamus per preaentes quod nullus lector ^fg^"^ ^^ 
lecture predicte qui pro tempore fuerit cessabit a lectura predicta vltra pended for 
quatuor dies in vno termino, nisi sit pro causa rationabili et legitima Jdajs in 
coram CanceUario aut Vioecancellario vniversitatis predicte vel eorum **™* 
seu eorum alterius deputatum et maiori parte doctorum sacre theologie 
pro tempore ibidem ezist^itium cognita et probata, et licentia inde 
a pre&to CanceUario vel Vicecancellario aut eorum sou eorum alterius 
deputato prius petita, babita et optenta. 

Yolumus etiam quod per talem licentiam nuUus huiusmodi lector No Reader 
se abeentet a lectura predicta vltra quatuordecim dies in vno termino ; for mora 
et quod idem lector tempore sue absentie aliam personam aptam, in term ^ 
babilem et idoneam vice et loco suis, qualis per dictum Canoellarium S^^^^ * 
aut Vicecancellarium vel eorum seu eorum alterius deputatum vna 
cum maiori uimiero doctorum predictorum videbitur fore sufficiens, ad 
legendum in sacra theologia in loco et bora predictis per totum tempus 
illud sumptibus suis providebit 

£t volumus insuper quod deoetero quolibet biennio vltimo die Header to be 

diiMftn Bit 

cesaationis cuiuslibet termini, ante magnam vacacionem vniversitatis end of term 
predicte, vna apta, habilis et idonea persona in lectorem lecture predicte £ong Valca- 
pro vno biennio integro, videlicet a festo Nativitatis beate Marie hofioSoe*^ 
Yirginis tunc prozime sequente duntazat duraturo, eligatur sub forma '*" ^ y®*"- 
que sequitur; videlicet quod Cancellarius aut Vicecancellarius vni- Who are to 
versitatis predicte qui pro tempore fuerit vel eorum seu eorum alteriiis 
deputatuB, necnon omnes doctores, tam seculares quam regulares, 
inceptores et baccalaurii in divinis, qui antea fiierint in artibus regentes 
in vniversitate predicta, adtunc in eadem vniversitate existentes qui 
interesse voluerint conveniant; videlicet, quolibet vltimo die cesaationis 
termini predicti, ante magnam vacacionem, in domo vocata le assemble 
hawse in vniversitate predicta, et ibidem quilibet doctorum, inceptorum, 
et baocalauriorum predictorum, coram CanceUario aut VicecanceUario 
vniversitatis predicte pro tempore exiatente, vel eorum seu eorum 
alterius deputato, iuramentum solempniter prestabit corporale ad eli- 
gendum eundem lectorem qui tunc erit, aut aliam talem personam 
aptam, babilem et idoneam, qualis sibi melius et vtilius videbitur 
expediri, omni favore, parcialitate, meroede, timore et affeccione sinistra 
totaliter postpositis. Quo finite idem Cancellarius aut Vicecancellarius Procedure 
vel eorum seu eorum alterius deputatus cmn doctors et baocalaurio *** **"' 
senioribus ibidem existentibus accipiet scrutinium de singulis votis et 
vocibus onmium eorundem doctorum, inceptorum et baccalauriorum 
ibidem existentium, propriis eorum manibus subscriptis, et eidem 
CanceUario aut VicecanceUario^ aut eorum seu eorum alterius deputato, 
doctori et baocalaurio senioribus prefatis secrete deUberatis, incipiendo 
scrutinium illud a iuniori baocalaurio et sic ascendendo vsque ad 



beelectom. 



62 Benefactions of the Lady Margaret 



ThecftMof 
equalitf of 
TOtes. 



When notice 
of election le 
to be glyen. 



How the 
BeadermsT 
beremored 
if 



Procednre 
at election 
after such 
removaL 



seniorem doctorem tunc ibidem existentem. Et ilium, qui pluribus 
votis et vocibujH in eleccione ilia prevalebit, in lectorem lecture predicte 
per dictum Cancellarium aut Vicecancellarium, vel eorum seu eorum 
alterius deputatum, pro duobus annis integris, vt predictum est, 
admitti volumuB et ordinamus per preeentes. 

Proviso semper quod, si sint diuerse persone equales voces in 
eleccione ilia habentes, time ilia persona earumdem personarum que 
votum et vocem dicti Cancellarii aut Vicecancellarii seu eorum vel 
eorum alterius deputati obtinuerit in eadem eleccione, prevalebit. 

Et volumus quod ante quamlibet huiusmodi eleccionem Cancellarius 
aut Vicecanoellarius vniversitatis predicte, vel eorum seu eorum alterius 
deputatiis, solempniter publicari et declarari faciat in omnibus scholis 
vniversitatis predicte quolibet anno per tres dies legibiles vltimum 
diem cessationis cuiuslibet termini ante m^ignam vacacionem predictam 
proxime precedeutes, quod omnes et siuguli interesse in eleccione ilia 
habentes die et loco predictis ad eandem eleccionem fiendam si voluerint 
conveniant. 

Etiam volumus et ordinamus per presentes quod si oontingat 
aliquem lectorem predictorum ordinacioni et voluntati nostris supra- 
dictis contravenire, aut de aliquo crimine, vitio vel malefacto per 
Cancellarium aut Vicecancellarium vniversitatis predicte pro tempore 
existentem, vel eorum seu eorum alterius deputatum, et maiorem 
niunerum Doctorum in vniversitate predicta tunc ibidem existentium 
notari, tunc idem lector primo, secundo, et tertio inde moneatur ; et si 
ad secundam monicionem se non reformaverit cum efiectu, tunc per 
substraccionem stipendii sui secundum discretionem Cancellarii aut 
Vicecancellarii, vel eorum seu eorum alterius deputati, et doctorum 
illorum puniatur. Que pecunia sic substracta ad vtilitatem vniversitatis 
predicte per discretionem ejusdem Cancellarii aut VicecanceUarii dis- 
ponatur. Et si post tertiam monicionem se non reformaverit, tunc a 
lectura sua et servicio suo predicto penitus amoveatur. 

Et volumus et ordinamus per presentes quo^ quotiescunque lectura 
predicta de lectore per talem amocionem aut per mortem vel cessionem 
alicuius lectoris seu aliquo alio mgdo quocunque vacaverit, tunc Can- 
caUarius aut Vicecancellarius vniversitatis predicte, vel eorum seu 
eorum alterius deputatus, indilate solempniter publicabit et declarari 
faciet in omnibus scholis dicte vniversitatis, si infra aliquem terminum 
lecturam predictam sic vacare contigerit, per tres dies legibiles tunc 
proxime sequentes, quod lectura predicta a lectore vacauerit. Et si sit 
extra terminum, tunc idem Cancellarius aut Vicecancellarius, vel 
eorum seu eorum alterius deputatus, illud publicari faciet in duobus 
locis communioribus vniversitatis predicte, videlicet^ ad ostium introitus 
in communes scholas et ad ostium ecclesie sancte Marie Virginis, in 
scriptis sigillo eiusdem Cancellarii aut Vicecancellarii, vel eorum seu 
eorum alterius deputati, consignatis, ibidem per quatuor dies tunc 
proxime sequentes permansuris, ad premoniendum omnes et singulos 



Readership in Divinity 63 

interesse in eleccione predicta habentes convenire ad domum predictam 
vocatam U cusemble howw quinio die proxime post primam monitionem 
sic factam ad eleccionem novi lecioris in forma predicta faciendam. 
Et tunc idem Cancellarius aut Yicecancellarius, vel eorum seu eorum 
alterius deputatus, simul cum doctoribus et baccalauriis predictis, 
procedant et faciant eleccionem novi lectoris in omnibus modo et 
forma supradictis. 

Et volumus quod dictus Cancellarius aut Yicecancellarius vel ^Jj^****° 
eorum seu eorum alterius deputatus immediate post eleccionem cuius- 
cunque lectoris lecture predicte in presentia doctorum, inceptorum et 
baccalauriorum predictorum tunc ibidem existentium publico declarabit 
seu declarari faciet fimdacionem et ordinaciones nostras in presentibus 
contentas et specificatas. 

Volumus etiam quod quilibet lector lecture predicte immediate o»thof 
post admissionem suam predictam coram prefato Cancellario aut 
Yicecancellario, vel eorum seu eorum alterius deputato, et doctoribus 
predictis tunc ibidem ezistentibus, iuramentum solempniter prestabit 
oorporale quod ipse omnes et singulas ordinaciones nostras lecturam 
predictam conceiTientes pro parte sua iuzta vim, formam, et effectum 
earundem bene et fideliter servabit et adimplebit. 

Et volumus et ordinamus per presentes quod quilibet lector lecture When 
predicte, qui in aliquo vltimo die cessationis alicuius termini ante tobegin.^'^ 
magnam vacacionem predictam, vel post eundem vltimum diem, et 
ante primum diem Octobris time proxime sequentem, in lectorem 
lecture predicte iuxta ordinaciones nostras predictas eligetiu*, incipiet 
lecturam suam predictam primo die termini tunc proxime sequentis, 
et sic vsque festum nativitatis beate Marie Virgin is tunc proxime 
sequens iuxta ordinaciones nostras predictas continuabit Et quod 
quilibet lector lecture predicte, qui aliquo tempore anni post primum 
diem Octobris infra vnimi annum tunc proxime sequentem post 
mortem, amocionem vel cessionem alicuius lectoris lecture predicte in 
lectorem lecture illius vt prefertur electus fiierit, incipiet lecturam 
suam predictam infra quatuordecim dies post eleccionem huiusmodi 
proxime sequentes, si infra aliquem terminum fuerit, et, si extra 
terminum fuerit, tunc incipiet lecturam suam predictam infra octo dies 
proxime post inceptionem termini tunc proxime sequentis. Et quod 
quilibet huiusmodi lector sic post mortem, amocionem, sive cessionem 
alicuius lectoris lecture predicte electus continuabit lecturam suam 
predictam iuxta ordinaciones nostras predictas vsque ad festum nativi- 
tatis beate Marie Virginis eleccionem suam tunc proxime sequens. 

Et vlterius volumus et ordinamus per presentes quod quilibet 
lectorum predictorum, qui pro tempore fuerit, circa principium et 
finem cuiuslibet termini solempniter declarari et publicari faciet funda- 
cionem lecture predicte, et ibidem, durante vita nostra, exhortetur 
omnes et singulos ibidem presentes devote cum ipso dicere himc 
psalmum, Deus misereatur nostri, cum speciali coUecta pro bono statu 




64 Benefactions of tJie Lady MargareA 

Dostre fundatricis lecture predicte; et post decessum nostrum hunc 

psalmum, Be 'profu/ndu damam^ cum special! collecta pro anima 

nostra, et alia generali collecta pro animabus omnium progenitorum et 

antecessorum nostrorum ac omnium fidelium defunctorum. 

Deed of Volumus insuper quod predictus lector semper semel in anno, circa 

to% read^ medium vnius termini, hanc nostram fundacionem publioe et solemp- 

Snm!£ Uen ^^^^ ^^'^ vnius lecture de verbo in verbum distincte leget, et etiam vt 

of a lectuxe. predicitur orabit, ac alios orare exhortabitur. 

The Reader, Et etiam volumus et ordinamus quod quilibet lector lecture pre- 
sayB^idbM, b dicte pro tempore existens in qualibet missa sua devote dicet pro bono 
fche^B^'of statu nostro, durante vita nostra, hanc oollectam, Lta» qui iuttificas 
Omnten. ifnpium <tc, vnacum secreto et postcommunione vnacum speciali me- 
moria nostri in suo memento pro vivis; et post decessum nostrum 
DeiLS cm. proprivm minoremy cum secreto et postcommunione vnacum 
speciali memoria pro anima nostra et animabus progenitorum et ante- 
cessorum nostrorum in suo memento pro mortuis. 
BtiDend to Et volumus et ordinamus quod quilibet lector lecture predicte pro 

paid by the' tempore existens habeat pro salario, stipendio et labore suis, videlicet, 
Convent^or P^o quolibet anno tresdecim librae, sex solidos et octo denarios bone 
Wwt^' et legalis monete Anglie, per Abbatem, Priorem et Conventum Mona- 
"*^*®'- sterii beati Petri Westmonasteriensis et successores suos ad festa 
Pasche et sancti Michaelis archangeli per equales porciones, iuxta 
voluntatem nostram iu quibusdam Indenturis inter nos et prefatos 
Abbatem, Priorem et Conventum inde conficiendis specificatam et 
declaratam, bene et iideliter in dicta Universitate Cantabrigiae solvenda. 
If the Et volumus et ordinamus per presentes quod, quandocunque et 

choe^'vioe- totiens quotiens aliquis lector lecture predicte in officium Cancellarii 
chanoellor. ^^^ Vicecancellarii vniversitatis predicte electus et prefectus fuerit, 
quod extunc idem lector, sic in officium Cancellarii aut Vicecancellarii 
electus, lecturam suam in lectura predicta in forma supradicta a tem- 
pore cuiuslibet eleccionis huiusmodi per vnum mensem tunc proximo 
sequentem et non vltra continuabit, et quod infra quindecim dies post 
eleccionem cuiuslibet huiusmodi lectoris in officium Cancellarii aut 
Vicecancellarii vniversitatis predicte novus lector lecture predicte 
eligatur in forma predicta, et in officium eiusdem lecture a fine eiusdem 
mensis vsque ad festum nativitatis beate Marie Virginis time proximo 
sequens continuabit, et lecturam predictam a fine eiusdem mensis 
vsque ad idem festum terminis, diebus, horis et loco predictis iuxta 
formam predictam bene et fideliter observabit. 
Power to Nos tamon prefata Comitissa auctoritatem et potestatem expla- 

Btatufes n- nandi reformandi et corrigendi omnes et singulas ordinaciones predictas 
^>vmdi!Ma ®^ earum quamlibet, et etiam easdem ordinaciones minuendi et iu 
melius mutandi, ac alias ordinaciones congruas, vtiles et necessarias, 
ordinationibus nostris supradictis, ac omnibus aliis ordinationibus 
nostris fiendis, et eorum cuilibet addendi, durante vita nostra, totiens 
quotiens nobis videbitur expediri, reservamus per presentes. 



Fonndation of a Preaehership 66 

In cuius rei testimonium presentibus tripartitis indentatis sigillum 
nostrum apposuimus. Datum dicto die et festo nativitatis beate Marie 
Virginis anno regni dicti Domini Regis Henrici septimi decimo octavo 
supradicto^. 



B. Foundation of a Preaehership, with statutes for 
the same, 30 October, 1504. 

In Dbi Nomine Amen. Cvan exoellentissimus Henricus rex Anglie J^^o^^b^oT 

et Francie et dominus Hibernie septimu8...per literas suas patentee, sranted 

quarum datum est apud Westmouasterium septimo die Februarii anno 

regni sui decimo nono, concesserit et licentiam dederit nobis Margarete 

Comitisse Richmond' matri eiusdem domini regis et ezecutoribus nostris, 

quod...vnam cantariam perpetuam vnius Predicatoris verbi dei ad Her 

intentions 
laudem et honorem sancte et indiyidue trinitatis ac fidei christiaue described. 

augmentum, necnon ob nostre anime et animarum parentum progeni- 
torum et antecessorum nostrorum ac omniiun fidelium defunctorum 
salutem, in vniuersitate Cantebr* Eliensis dioces' iuxta oidinaciones et 
statuta nostra vel executorum nostrorum fundare, creare, erigere et 
stabilire possimus, possit aut possint; et quod predicator cantarie 
predicte, cum sic fundatus, creatus, erectus et stabilitus fiierit, pre- 
dicator verbi dei per Margaretam Comitissam Richmond' matrem regis 
Henrici septimi in vniuersitate Cantebr' fimdatus nuncupetur; ac 
quod predicator huiusmodi pro tempore existens sit vnum corpus in re 
et nomine habeatque successionem perpetuam, et quod ipse et succes- 
sores sui per nomen predicatoris verbi dei per Margaretam Comitissam 
Richmond' matrem regis Henrici septimi in vniuersitate Cantabr' 
ordinati in omnibus et omnimodis accionibus, sectis, causis, querelis et 
placitis, tam realibus quam personalibus et mixtis, ac placitis assise nove 
disseisine et omnibus aliis materiis et causis quibuscunque in quibus- 
cunque curiis tam spiritualibus quam temporalibus implacitare possint 
et implacitari, respondere et responded, ac per idem nomen perquirere, 
recipere, appropriare, consolidare, annectere et vnire, habere, gaudere et 
possidere sibi et successoribus suis, ac dare et concedere possint terras, 
tenementa^ redditus, reuenciones, servicia, porciones, penciones, apportus 
et annuitates ac advocaciones, hospitalia, prioratus, liberas capellas ac 
alia beneficia ecclesiastica quecunque, necnon omnia et omnimoda 
hereditamenta ac alias possessiones quascunque ac bona et catalla 
quecunque prout in eisdem literis patentibus plenius continetur. 

^ Close Boll, 22 Hen. VH. p. 2, dorso. Copied by Hare (paper copy), iii 
fol. 33 b — 38 a. The original deed of foundation is in the Registry of the 
University, Vol. xxxix. 1. 1, bat so much damaged as to be nearly illegible. 

c. 6 



66 Benefaction^ of the LoAy Margaret 



BTTirtne 
or the aaid 
lettera » 
Preacher- 
ship is 
founded 
30 Oct. 1504. 



John Fawne 
to be the 
first 
Preacher. 



^ 1 status 
oflhe 
Preacher. 



Preacher 
to deliver 
six sermons 
in each year. 



At 8. Paul's 
Cross, or in 
chuicuiof 
S. Margaret 
at Westmin- 
ster. 



No8 antedicta Comitissa ratione et vigore literarum patentium 
predictarum ac authoritate nobis per easdem literas pateutes oonceasa 
tricoBimo die Octobrie anno regni dicti domini regis et filii mei vioesimo 
vnam cantariam perpetuam vnius predicatoris verbi dei in vniuersitate 
Cantabr* erigimus, creamus, fundamus et stabilimus per presentes, ac 
predicatorem illiun predicatorem verbi dei per Margaretam Comitissam 
Richmond' matrem regis Henrici septimi in vniuersitate Cantabr' 
fiindatum nuncupari nominari et vocari ordinamus per presentes. 

Et quendam magistrum Johannem Fawne sacre theologie bacca- 
laurium primum predicatorem cantarie predicte facimus creamus et 
ordinamus per presentes, et quod idem predicator habeat successionem 
perpetuam, quodque idem predicator et successores sui sint vnum 
corpus in re et nomine, et quod ipse et successores sui per nomen 
predicatoris verbi dei per Margaretam Comitissam Richmond' matrem 
regis Henrici septimi in vniuersitate Cantabr' ordinati in omnibus et 
omnimodis accionibus, sectis, causis, querelis et placitis, tam realibus 
quam personalibus et mixtis, ac placitis assise nove disseisine et in 
omnibus aliis materiis et causis quibuscunque in quibuscunque curiis 
tam spiritualibus quam temporalibus implacitare possiut et implaci- 
tari, respondere et responderi, ac per idem nomen perquirere, recipere, 
appropriare, consolidare, annectere et vnire, habere, gaudere et possidere 
sibi et successoribus suis ac dare et concedere possint terras, tenementa, 
redditus, reuenciones, seruicia, pensiones, porciones, apportus et an- 
nuitates ac aduocaciones, hospitalia, prioratus, liberas capellas et alia 
beneficia eoclesiastica quecimque, necnon omnia et omnimoda heredita- 
menta et alias possessiones quascunque ac bona et catalla quecunque. 

Yolumus insuper et ordinamus per presentes quod predictus pre- 
dicator verbi dei et successores stu predicatores huiusmodi palam, 
publico, personaliter et solenniter predicabit aut predicabunt singulis 
annis perpetuis futuris temporibus sex solennes et publicos sermones 
in forma que sequitur: videlicet, omni anno predicator predictus pro 
tempore existens vnum sermonem apud crucem Sancti Pauli in ceme- 
terio Sancti Pauli London semel vno die dominioo aut alio consueto 
plures sermones ibidem publico et solenniter predicabit dum tamen ad 
ibidem semel predicandum quovismodo licentiam poterit optinere. 
Et si idem predicator vnum diem dominicum aut alium vt predicitur 
ad predicandum ibidem, vt premittitur, sibi assignari semel in anno 
optinuerit, et eodem die sic, vt predicitur, eidem apud dictam cruoem 
limitato propter aliquam racionabilem causam ad predicandum non 
admittatur, de quo impedimento in sabbato ante huiusmodi diem 
dominicum aut alium quemounque diligenter faciet inquisicionem, 
tunc volumus quod predicator predictus in ecclesi& sancte Margarete 
apud Westmonasterium suum solenniter predicabit sermonem ipso 
eodem die quo apud crucem Sancti Pauli predicare deberet vt pre- 
mittitur. Si tamen in dicta ecclesia sancte Margarete ex aliqua 
racionabili causa dicto die predicare nequiverit, tunc volumus quod 



Foundation of a Preachership 67 

predicator predictus eundem sermonem in vna ecclesia exoellentiori 
infra civitatem London predicare oninino teneatur. Volumus tamen 
quod semel saltern inft'a biennium apiid dictam cnicem Sancti Pauli 
London omni exciisacione postposita vnum ad minus predicabit 
sermonem. 

Item volumus quod idem predicator semel aliquo die festo in AJ^'^jJ**'* 
ecclesiis de Chesthunt, Ware (London Dioc') Bassingbom, Orwell, 
Babram (Eliens' Dioc'), Maxey, duabus ecclesiis parochialibus de 
Depjng, videlicet sancti Jacobi et sancti Andree, Bum, Boston, et 
Swynneshed (Lincoln Dioc') semel infra biennium solempniter et 
publice predicabit. Ita tamen quod ad minus sex sermones singulis 
annis in predictts ecclesiis ad placitum suum predicare teneatur. 

Volumus etiam et ordinamus quod electio et provisio dicti pre- Prea«herto 

dicatoris verbi dei de triennio in triennium ad Cancellarium aut every three 

vicecancellarium vniversitatis Cantabr* sen eorum vel eorum alterius ^""' 

deputatum et magistros, custodes, prepositos aut presidentes coUegi- 

orum dicte vniversitatis perpetuis futuris temporibus pertineat in 

forma que sequitur, videlicet, quod Cancellarius aut Yicecancellarius 

vniversitatis predicte qui pro tempore fuerit, vel eorum seu eorum 

alterius deputatus, infra quatuordecim dies a tempore quo officium Procedure 
,. . .^ ,.' ^ X- -x • . . .. ^ . . at election, 

predicatons predicti vacare coutigent sive per tnennii expiracionem, 

per mortem, cessionem, dimissionem, amocionem, alicuius beneficii 
acceptacionem, vel quia idem predicator in vniversitate predicta resi- 
dere noluerit, convocabit seu convocari faciet ad eoclesiam beate Marie 
Virginis infr^a dictam vniversitatem omnes magistros, custodes, pre- 
positos seu presidentes omnium et singulorum coUegiorum dicte 
vniversitatis ad tunc in eadem vniversitate existentes qui interesse 
voluerint ad eligendum vnimi predicatorem verb! dei aptum, habilem 



et idoneum ad predicandum, videlicet vnum sacre theologie doctorem ^jjjjfgf *° 
socium perpetuum alicuius coUegii dicte vniversitatis vel alium doc- ^jP^f *^ 



torem extra coUegiimi in eadem commorantem, si quis doctor in eadem » Ck>liege 
vniversitate aptus, habilis, et ad predicandum idoneus reperiatur qui chosen, 
dictum officium predicandi acceptare, et ibidem residere voluerit. Et 
si in collegiis vel extra collegia infra dictam vniversitatem non 
reperiatur talis doctor vt premittitur, time volumus quod dictus 
Cancellarius seu Yioecanoellarius, aut eorum vel eorum alterius depu- 
tatus et magistri prepositi seu presidentes coU^orum vt predicitur 
vnum sacre theologie inceptorem socium alicuius oollegii vel alibi in 
dicta vniversitate studentem aptum habilem et ad predicandum 
idoneum, omni favore, parcialitate, mercede, timore, et afieccione 
totaliter postpositis, eligant seu maior pars eorundem magistrorum 
eligat 

Et si per ipsos, videlicet Cancellarium aut vicecancellarium vel £jji^^^ 
eorum seu eorum alterius deputatum et magistros prepositos seu mrMtyhe 

,. . . . 1 . ,. not found. » 

presidentes predictoe seu per maiorem partem eorundem tabs sacre B.D.i8tobe 

theologie inoeptor aptus habilis et ad predicandum idoneus non 

6—2 



68 BemfcLCtiom of the Lady Margaret 

reperiatur, tunc volumus quod idem Cancellarius aut Vicecancellarius 
vel eorum seu eorum alterius deputatus et magistri prepositi seu 
presidentes collegiorum predictorum vnum sacre theologie baccalaurium 
socium alicuius collegii aut alibi in vniversitate commorantem aptum 
habilem et ad predicandum omnino idoneum, (in quo conscientiam 
dictorum Cancellarii, Vicecancellarii aut eorum et eorum alterius 
deputati et magistrorum, prepositorum sive presidentium striate in 
domino oneramus), ad officium predicatoris verbi dei eligant. 

Et si in tempore eleccionis predicatoris predicti Cancellarius aut 
Yioecancellarius qui pro tempore fuerit, vel eorum seu eorum alterius 
deputatus, et magistri prepositi sive presidentes collegiorum dicte 
The election vniversitatis super vno doctore inceptore seu baccalaurio vt predicitur 
Moordanoe vnanimiter et concorditer non consenserint, tunc volumus quod ille 
▼oteof the doctor inceptor vel baccalaurius in predicatorem predictum eligatur, 
m^ority. (jj quem coram Cancellario aut Vioecanoellario vel eorum seu eorum 
alterius deputato maior pars magistrorum prepositorum sive presi- 
dentium collegiorum predictorum consenserint. 
And ee- Proviso semper quod, si sint diuerse persone ad officium predicatoris 

Sm^ate ^ predicti equales voces habentes, omnino eligatur et ad officium predicti 
the^n- predicatoris admittatur qui votum et vocem Cancellarii aut Vioe- 
^^ra'aJan- cancellarii vel eorum seu eorum alterius deputati, qui tunc et ibidem 
A membeT* presens fuerit, optinuerit. Proviso semper quod in onmi huiusmodi 
«f Chri8t|a eleccione predicatoris nostri aliquis de collegio Christi ceteris paribus 
preferred. preferatur. 

HojrBoon a Insuper volumus et ordinamus, quando et quoties contigerit aliquem 

to be elected talem predicatorem in eodem officio per triennium continuare, quod 
yearstenuro. timc infra quatuordecim dies tunc proxime sequentes finem cuiuslibet 
talis triennii a prime die admissionis sue in officium suum cantarie 
predicatoris predicti dies et annos oomputando, idem aut alius 
in predicatorem predictum eligatur modo et forma superius ex- 
pressis. 

Volumus etiam quod quilibet talis predicator verbi dei, sic ut 
premittitur electus, in admissione sua coram Cancellario aut Vice- 
cancellario vel eorum seu eorum alterius deputato magistris et 
prepositis sive presidentibus collegiorum predictorum tunc ibidem 
^thtobe existentibus, iuramentum solempniter prestabit corporale quod ipse 
preacher. omnes et singulas ordinaciones nostrcbs predicatoris huiusmodi officium 
ooncementes pro parte sua iuxta vim, formam et efiectum earundem 
bene et fideliter observabit et adimplebit, quas quidem ordinaciones 
idem predicator tunc et ibidem de verbo ad verbum, tactis per eum 
Sanctis Evangeliis, coram dicto Cancellario aut Yicecancellario vel 
eorum seu eorum alterius deputato et magistris et prepositis sive 
presidentibus predictis, in dicta sua admissione leget ; de quibus iura- 
mento et leccione predicator sic admissus sumptibus et expensis suis 
in registris predicti Cancellarii aut Vicecancellarii pro tempore existentis 
plenam et expressam mencionem fieri faciat. 



Foundation of a Preachership 69 

Volumus etiam quod predicator predictus nullum omnino habeat Preacher to 
beneficium, et quod, dictis suis sermonibus expeditis, in dicta vni- oUier°offioe 
versitate continuo resideat, iusto et racionabili impedimento cessante, p^fowihip. 
in quo conscieutiam eiusdem predicatoris stricte in Domino oneramus. 
Proviso semper quod idem predicator poijsit esse socius cuiuscunque 
collegii dicte vniversitatis et habere societatem cuiuscunque coUegii ac 
omnibus et singulis eiusdem gaudere emolumentis vna cum salario et 
stipendio nostris. 

Volumus etiam et ordinamus quod quilibet predicator cantarie ^*"^J*®\{** 
predicte perpetuis futuris temporibus in singulis suis sermonibus orabit FoondreaB 
et alios orare exhortabitur pro bono et prospero statu nostro fundatricis family, 
cantarie predicte dum in humanis vixorimus, ac pro felici statu illus- 
trissimi principis nostri Henrici septimi carissimi filii mei et principis 
cum tota nobili eiusdem progenie et pro bono statu aliorum omnium 
pro quibus orare decrevimus, et post decessum nostrum pro anima 
nostra et anima nobilissimi principis Johannis ducis Somersett ac 
domine Margarete consortis sue progenitorum nostrorum, ac pro ani- 
mabus nobilissime domine Elizabethe nuper regine et consortis predicti 
domini regis nostri ac domini Thome Stanley Comitis Derby et pro 
anima predicti filii mei carissimi cum ab hac luce migraverit, necnon 
pro animabus aliorum omnium pro quibus teuemur et specialiter 
volumus ad Deum preces effundi, et pro animabus omnium fidelium 
defunctorum. 

Volumus etiam quod idem predicator pro tempore existens in prayers to 
qualibet missa sua devote dicet pro bono statu nostro, durante vita ^"'**- 
nostra, banc collectam, Devis qui jrutificoLs impium^ cum secreto et 
postcommunione vna cum speciali memoria nostri in suo memento 
pro vivis, et post decessum nostrum, Deas cut proprium minorem 
cum secreto et postcommunione vna cum speciali memoria pro anima 
nostra et animabus progenitorum et antecessorum nostrorum ac ali- 
orum omnium superius nominatorum pro quibus orari volumus ac 
pro animabus omnium fidelium defunctorum in suo memento pro 
mortuis. 

Volumus insuper et ordinamus per presentes quod, si contingat What is to 
aliquem predicatorem cantarie predicte ordinacionibus et voluntatibus the Preacher 
nostris supradictis contravenire, aut de aliquo crimine, vitio seu male- guft^of 
facto per Cancellarium aut Vicecancellarium vniversitatis predicte pro *°^ crime, 
tempore existentem aut eorum seu eorum alterius deputatum et 
maiorem partem magistrorum pref^itorum seu custodum collegiorum 
vniversitatis predicte tunc et ibidem existentium notari, tunc idem 
predicator primo, secundo, et tertio moneatiu*; et si ad secundam 
monicionem se non reformaverit cum efifectu, tunc per substraccionem 
stipend] i secundum discrecionem Cancellarii aut Vicecancellarii predicti 
vel eorum seu eorum alterius depUtati et maioris partis prefatorum 
magistrorum, prepositorum, custodum collegiorum puniatur, que pc- 
cunia sic substracta ad vtilitatem vniversitatis predicte per discrecionem 



70 Betiefdctiotis of the Lady Margaret 



The 

Preacher's 
yearly 
salary to 
be £10. 



The Foun- 
dresB re- 
serves to 
herself the 
right of 
changing 
these 
statutes. 



Cancellarii vel Vicecancellarii i)rcdicti aut eoruta aeu eonim alterius 
deputati disponatur ; et si post tertiam monicionem se non reformaverit 
tunc ab officio et servicio predicatoris predicti i)enitus amoveatur. 

Et volumus et ordinamus quod quilibet predicator verbi Dei pro 
tempore existens habeat pro salario stipendio et labore suis, videlicet 
pro quolibet anno decern libraa legalis monete Anglie per Abbatem, 
IViorem et Conventum monasterii beati Petri Westmouasteriensis et 
successores suos ad festa pasche et sancti Michaelis Archangeli i)er 
eqiiales porciones, iuxta voluntatem nostram in quibusdam indent oris 
inter nos et prefatos Abbatem, priorem et conventum inde confectis 
specificatam et declaratam, bene et fideliter in dicta vniversitate 
Cantabr* ad manum predicti predicatoris seu ejus deputati singulis 
annis persolvendas. 

Nos tamen prefata Comitissa auctoritatem et potestatem expla- 
nandi reformandi et corrigendi omiies et singulas ordinacioues predictas 
et earum quamlibet, ac etiam easdom ordinaciones minuend! et in 
melius mutandi, necnon alias ordinaciones congruas, vtiles et necessarias 
ordinacionibus nostris supradictis et earum cuilibet addendi durante 
vita nostra toties quoties nobis videbitur expedire ac huiusmodi pre- 
dicatoris admissionem et amocionem quotiescunque nobis videbitur 
similiter durante vita nostra reservamus |)er presenter 

In cuius rei testimonium presentibus trii)artitis iudentatis sigillum 
nostrum apposuimus die et anno supradictis^. 



Deed by which the Abbot and Convent of S. Peter's 
Westminster agree to pay the Lady Margaret's Reader 
an annual stipend of £IS, 6s, Sd. 1 July, 1503. 



Omnibus Christi fidelibus ad quos presons scriptum pervenerit 
Johannes Abbas monasterii beati Petri Westmonastcriensis ac Prior et 
Conventus eiusdem monasterii salutem. 

Sciatis nos prefatos Abbatem, Priorem, et Conventum vnanimi 
assensu et consensu nostris dedisse, concessisse ct hoc presenti scnpto 
nostro confirmasso magistro Johanni Fishor lectori lecture sacre 
theologie, per Margaretam Comitissam Richmond' matrem i-egis Henrici 
septimi in vniversitate Cantabr' fimdate, quamdam annuitatcm sive 
annualem rodditum tresdecim librarum, sex solidorum et octo dena- 
riorum, 

habendam, i^orcipiendam et levandam predictam annuitatem sive 
annualem redditum tresdecim libmnim, sex solidorum et octo dena- 
riorum, de nobis prefatis Abbate, Priore, et Conveutu, et successoribus 

1 Close Roll, 22 Henry VII. part 2. Copied by Hare, iu. 40. The 
original deed is in the Registry of the Uuiversity, but it is so much damaged 
as to be almost illegible. 



Stipend of the Reader 71 

no6tris prefato lectori lecture predicte et successoribuB suis imper- 
petuuin ad festa Sancti Michaelis Archangeli et Pasche in vniversitate 
predicta annuatim solyendam. Et si contingat predictam annuitatem 
sive annualem redditum tresdecim libranim, sex solidorum et octo 
denariorum a retro fore prefato lectori aut successoribus suis in parte 
vel in toto per sex septimanas post aliquod festum festorum pre- 
dictorum quo vt prefertur solvi debeat insolutam, quod tunc bene 
licebit prefato lectori et successoribus suis in manerium de Drajton et 
omnia terras et tenementa ipsorum Abbatis, Prioris et Conventus in 
West Drayton, Hillington, Colham, Woxbridge, Drayton, Willesdon, 
Padjngton, Westbome, et Kensington in Comitatu Middlesex, ac in 
manerium de Hendon cum pertinentiis ipsorum Abbatis, Prioris et 
Conventus in eodem Comitatu, et in quamlibet eorumdem parcellam 
intrare et distringere et districciones sic captas licite asportare, ab- 
ducere et penes se retinere, quousque eidem lectori et successoribus 
suis de dicta annuitate sive annuali redditu tresdecim librarum, sex 
solidorum et octo denariorum et arreragiis eiusdem, si que fuerint, 
plenarie fuerit satisfactum et persolutum. 

£t nos prefati Abbas, Prior et Conventus concedimus et obligamus 
nos et successores nostros prefato lectori et successoribus suis per 
presentes quod toties quoties contingat dictam annuitatem sive annua- 
lem redditum tresdecim librarum, sex solidorum et octo denariorum 
a retro fore prefato lectori aut successoribus suis in parte vel in toto 
per duos menses post aliquod festum festorum predictorum, quo ut 
prefertur solvi debeat, Nos prefati Abbas, Prior et Conventus foris- 
faciemus et solvemus prefato lectori et successoribus suis quadraginta 
Bolidos nomine pene ; et quod bene licebit eidem lectori et successoribus 
suis tam pro dicta annuitate sive annuali redditu tresdecim librarum, 
sex solidorum et octo denariorum, quam pro predictis quadraginta 
solidis sic nomine pene concessis, in maneria, terras et tenementa 
predicta cum pertinentiis et quamlibet eorumdem parcellam intrare et 
distringere, et districciones sic captas abducere, asportare et penes se 
retinere, quousque eidem lectori et successoribus suis tam de dicta 
annuitate sive aunuali redditu tresdecim librarum, sex solidorum et 
octo denariorum quam de dictis quadraginta solidis ut prefertur nomine 
pene concessis plenarie fuerit satisfactum et persolutum. 

In cuius rei testimonium huic presenti scripto nostro sigillum 
nostrum commune apposuimus. Datum primo die Julii anno Domini 
millesimo quingenteeimo tertio et aimo regni regis Henrici septimi 
post conquestum Angliae decimo octavo^. 

1 Close Roll, 22 Henry VII. part 2, dorso. Copied by Hare (paper 
copy), iii. S8. 



72 Benefactions of the Lady Margaret 



D. Deed by which the Abbot and Convent of Westminster 
agree to pay the Lady Margaret's Preacher an annual 
stipend of £10. 6 November , 1505. 

Omnibus Chribti fidelibus ad quos hoc presens scriptiim iiervenerit 
Johannes Abbas monasterii beati Petri Westmonasteriensis ac prior et 
conventus eiusdem monasterii salutem. 

Sciatis nos prefatos Abbatem, priorem et conventum vnanimi 
assensu et consensu nostris dedisse, concessisse ac hoc presenti scripto 
nostro confirmasse Johanni Fawne in sacra theologia baccalaurio pre- 
dicatori verbi dei in honore nominis Jesu et Anniinciacionis beate 
Marie Virginis per Margaretam Comitissam Richmond' matrem regis 
Henrici septimi in Universitate Oantabr' fundato quandam annuitatem 
sine annualem redditum decern librarum, habendam, percipiendam et 
levandam predictam annuitatem sive annualem redditum deoem libra- 
rum de nobis prefatis Abbate, priore et conventu et successoribus 
nostris imperpetuum ad festa Pasche et Sancti Michaelis Archangeli 
in Tniversitate predicta annuatim solvendauL 

Et si contingat predictam annuitatem sive annualem redditum 
decem librarum a retro fore prefato predicatori aut successoribus suis 
in parte vel in toto per sex septimanas post aliquod festum festorum 
predictorum, quo vt prefertur solvi debeat, insolutam, quod tunc bene 
licebit prefato predicatori et successoribus suis in manerium de Drayton 
cum pertinenciis ac in omnia terras et tenementa nostra in West 
Drayton, Hillingdon, Colham, Woxbrigge et in parochiis de Willesdon, 
Padington, Westbome, et Kensington cum pertineutiis in Comitatu 
Middlesex, et in quamlibet eorumdem parcellam intrare et distringere, 
districcionesque sic ibidem captas licite abducere et penes se retinere, 
quousque eidem predicatori et successoribus suis de dicta annuitate 
sive annuali redditu decem librarum et arreragiis eiusdem, si que 
fuerint, plenarie fiierit satisfactum et contentatum. 

Et nos prefati Abbas prior et conventus concedimus et obligamus 
nos et successores nostros prefato predicatori et successoribus suis per 
presentes quod, totiens quotiens contingat predictam annuitatem sive 
annualem redditum decem librarum a retro fore prefato predicatori aut 
successoribus suis in parte vel in toto post duos menses post aliquod 
festum festorum predictorum, quo vt prefertur solvi debeat, non 
Bolutam, nos prefeiti Abbas, prior et conventus et successores nostri 
forisfaciemus et solvemus prefato predicatori et successoribus suis 
viginti solidoB nomine pene, et quod bene licebit eidem predicatori et 
successoribus suis tam pro predicta annuitate sive annuali redditu 
decem librarum quam pro dictis viginti solidis nomine pene concessis 
in manerium, terras et tenementa predicta cum pertinenciis et quam- 
libet eorumdem parcellam intrare et distringere districcionesque sic 



Stipend of the Preacher 73 

captas licite asportare, abducere et penes se retinere, quousque eidem 
predicaiori et successoribus suis tarn de dicta annuitate sive annual! 
redditu decern librarum quam de dictis viginti solidis ut prefertur 
nomine pene concessis plenarie fuerit satisfactum et persolutum. 

Proviso semper quod si contingat (quod absit) manerium, terras et 
tenementa predicta a poesessione et seisina nostris predictorum Abbatis, 
prions et conventus aut successorum nostrorum iusto et legitimo titulo 
absque fraude, collusione et coviua nostris vel successorum nostrorum 
et non in defectu nostrum predictorum Abbatis, prioris et conventus 
et successorum totaliter evinci, et nos prefatos Abbatem, priorem et 
conventum et successores nostros a possessione sua inde iusto et 
legitimo titulo ab eisdem sine fraude, collusione et covina nostris 
predictorum Abbatis prioris et conventus vel successorum nostrorum 
per vnum annum integrum extra teneri, aut si contingat ecclesiam 
parochialem de Chesthunt in Comitatu Hertford, (London dioc') aut 
ecclesiam parochialem de Swyneshed in Comitatu Lincoln, (Lincoln 
dioc*) que nobis prefatis priori et conventui et successoribus nostris 
appropriate existunt, a possessione nostra predictorum Abbatis, prioris 
et conventus aut successorum nostrorum sine fraude, collusione et 
covina nostris et successorum nostrorum legitime evinci, et appropri- 
aciones predictas legitime dissolvi et evacuari, nosque prefatos Abbatem, 
priorem et conventum aut successores nostros ab eisdem ecclesiis seu 
eorum altera sine fraude, collusione et covina et assensu nostris 
predictorum Abbatis, prioris et conventus aut successorum nostrorum 
per vnum annum int^rum iusto et legitimo titulo extra teneri, quod 
extunc presens concessio dicte annuitatis sive annualis redditus decern 
librarum omnino cessetur et evacuetur et omni suo robore careat et 
virtute. 

In cuius rei testimonium huic presenti scripto nostro sigillum 
nostrum commune apposuimus. Datum sexto die Novembris anno 
Domini millesimo quingentesimo quinto, et anno regni regis Henrici 
septimi post conquestum vicesimo prime ^. 



E. Letters patent of King Henry the EiglUh, 
26 June, 1542. 

Henricus Octavus [etc.] Inspeximus inter racorda et irrotulamenta 
Curie augmentacionum reuencionum corone nostre quoddam decretum 
per Cancellarium et Consilium Curie predicte factum in hec verba : 

Memorandum: Where the excellent Prynces Margarete sometyme ^P^^^^^ 
Countes of Rychmonde and Derby, now deceased, mother to the right ship in 
excellent Prince of famous memory Henry the seventh late kynge of ihehSj ^ 
£uglond. Father to oure Souereign lorde kynge Henry theight, by ^**'^''* 
licence gy veu and graunted to her by the said kynge Henry the seventh, 

^ Close Boil, 22 Henry VU. part 2. Copied by Hare, ut supra, iii. 44. 



74 Beneftictions of the Lady Margaret 

erected, founded, ordeyned and establysshed one perpetuall Redere of 

holy Theologye in the Yniuersite of Cambrige wdche Reder shulde 

ia^!?benSJ ^*^® yerely for his stypende and wage threttene poundes sixe shillinges 

A^i^t d ^"^^ eight pence of leafiill money of Engiond, to be payed by the 

Convent of Abbotte, Prioure and Covent of the late Monastery of seynt Peter of 

Westmin- Westminster and theire sucoessours, in consideracion of oerten manours, 

appean hj landes, tenementes and other hereditamentes frely gy ven and graunted 

2 ]Jj[^^ by the said Coimtes to the said monastery, to here and supporte aswell 

^^^- the said stipend and wages, as also dyuerse other charges, as by one 

booke indented made betwene the said Countesse and the said Abbotte, 

Priour and Covent, beryng date the second daye of Marche in the xig^ 

yere of the reign of the moost excellent Pr3mce of famous memory 

kynge Henry the seventh Father to cure said souereign lorde more 

playnly apereth^. 

And where the Abbotte, Priour and Covent of the said late 

Monasterye after the foundacion of the said Beder by theire deede 

imder theire Covent seall hath according to theire Couenaunte and 

graunte conteyned in the said booke indented And according also to 

the confidence and trust put in them by the said Countesse, graunted 

Which and made sure to one John Fysher, Fyrst nominatte Reder, and to his 

J^SJT** successours Reders for euer one annuyte or yerely rent of threttene 

^Id to John poQ]2(ie8 sixe shillinges and eight pence at the feastes of Ester and 

seynt Michaell tharchaungell in the said Yniuersite yerely to be payed, 

with one clause of distresse in the Manour of Drayton in the Countie 

of Middlesex and in diuerse other landes and tenementes comprised in 

theire said graunte, as by theire deade bearyng date the Fyrst daye of 

July in the xviii*** yere of the reign of the said excellent Prynoe kynge 

Henry the seventh more playnly appereth, 

Which Con- whiche said monastery of Seynt Peter of Westminster with the holl 

sunendered possessions and reuenues spirituall and temix)rall therof is nowe gyven, 

to the Icing. g|ijTen(jred and come to cure souereign lorde kynge Henry the eight. 

Forasmoche as apon due examinacion it is duely proued before the 
Chauncelour and Councell of the Courte of Augmentacions of the 
reuenues of oure souereign lorde the kynges Crowne that the said 
annuyte or annuall rent of threttene poundes sixe shillinges and eight 
pence was contynually payed by the Abbotte and Covent of the said 
late monastery for the tyme beyng to the said Reder before and vntill 
the tyme of dissolucion of the said late monastery ; and bycause also 
it is the kynges pleasure that the said Reder shall contynue accordinge 
to the foundacion therof 

^ Odo of the two copies of this '* booke indented" is in the Registry of 
the University (CharUn^ etc., No. 148. A.). The other is in the British 
Masenm (MSS. Lansdowne, 441). It was evidently drawn up at the close of 
the Lady Margaret's life, when she was making arrangements for the services 
which she wished to have celebrated on her behalf ; and it contains also the 
doooments priuted above, as a record of previous transactions. 



Decrees of Court of Augmentaiions 75 



Itt is therfor ordered and decreed by the said Chauncelour and 
Counaell in the term of the holy Trynyte, that is to saye, the tenth 
day of June in the xxxiiij**> yere of oure souereign lorde kynge Henry 
theight, that one William Skeytt, bacheler in dyunyte, now Beder, and 
his succeesom^ Reders according to the foundacion therof conteyned 
in the said booke indented shall haiie and enjoye for euer the said 
annuyte or annuall rent of threttene poundes sixe shillinges and 
eight pence sterlinge to be payed by the handes of the Treasorer of the 
said Courte of Augmentacions for the tyme beyng of suche the kynges 
treasure of the same Augmentacions as shall remayne in the handes 
of the same Treasorer at the feastes of Ester and seynt Michaell 
tharchaungell by even porcions. 

And it is further ordered and decreed by the said Chauncelour and 
Coimcell that the said Reder shall haue aU the arrerages of the said 
annuyte due sythen and from the feaste of Seynt Michaell tharchaungell 
in the mj**» yere of the reign of oure souereign lorde kynge Heniy 
theight, to be payed also by the handes of the said Treasorer of the 
treasure aforsaid. 

Nos autem tenorem decreti predicti ad requisicionem dicti Willelmi 
duximus exemplificandiun per presentes. In cuius rei testimonium has 
literas nostras fieri fecimus patentes teste Ricardo Ryche milite apud 
Westmonasterium vioesimo sexto die Junii regni nostri tricesimo quarto^. 



Ittonow 
docieed by 
the Court of 
Angmenta- 
Uonsthat 
the Bftid 8ti- 
peDd shall 
be paid in 
the future. 



F. Letters patent of King Henry the Eighth, 
16 June, 1642. 

Henricus octauus [etc.] 

Inspeximus inter recorda et irrotulamenta Curie augmentacionum 
reuenciouum Corone nostre quoddam decretum per Cancellarium et 
Consilium eiusdem Curie factum in hec verba: 

Memorandum. Where the excellent Prynoes Margaret ... erected 
founded ordeyned establynsbed and made a i^erpetuall Chauntry of 
one preachour of the Worde of god in the vniuersitie of Cambrydge 
within the diocesse of Ely commonly called the Prechour of the 
Worde of god in the honour of the name of Jesu and than- 
nundacion of our blessed lady the virgeyn founded in the vniuersitie 
of Cambrydge within the diocesse of Ely by Margaret Countes of 
Rychemounde mother of Idnge Henry the seventh 

Wiche Preachour shuld haue yerely for his stypende and wages 
tenne po\mdes of lawfull money of Englonde to be paied by the Abbott 
Pryour and Covent of the late monasterye of seynt Peter of West- 
minster and their successours in consideracion of oerten manours 
landes tenementes and other heredytamentes frely given and graunted 
by the said Countesse to the said monasterye to here and supporte 

^ From the original, under the broad seal, preserved iu the Registry of 
the University, Chartergf etc., No. 164. 



Foundation 
of aPreach- 
erahipby 
theDMly 
Margaret 



Whose 
sahuy was 
to be paid 
by the Abbot 
of Westmin- 
ster as 
appears by 
dMddated 
2 March, 
150«. 




76 Bene/dctions of the Lady Margaret 

aswell the said stjpend and salary as also dyuerse other charges as by 
one booke indented made betwene the said Countes and the said 
Abbott Pryour and Covent bering date the second daye of Marche in 
the xxi^ yere of the reigne of the mooste excellent Prynce of Famous 
memory kynge Henry the seventh father to cure said soueraigne lord 
more playnly apereth. 

And where the Abbott Pryour and Covent of the said late mona- 
sterye after the fundacion of the said Chaunterye by their writinges 
vnder their Covent Seale hath accordinge to their covenaunte and 
graunte conteyned in the said booke indented And according also to 
the confidence and truste put in them by the said Countes graunted 
and made sure to one John Fawne, first nomynate Preachour and to his 
successoiUB for euer one aimuytie or yerely rent of tenne poundes at 
the feastes of Ester and seynt Michaell tharchaungell in the said 
vnyuersitie yerely to be paied With one clause of distres in the 
manour of Drayton in the Countie of Middlesex and in dyuerse other 
landes and tenementes comprised in their said graunte as by the said 
deade beryng date the y}^ daye of Novembre in the said xxj** yere of 
the reigne of the said excellent Prynce kynge henry the seventh moore 
playnly apereth 
Which con- Wiche said monasterye of seynt Peter of Westminster with the 

aunende^ hooU possessyons and reuenues spirituall and temporall therof is nowe 
to the king. gjy^Q surrendred and come to cure said soueraigne lord kynge Henry 

theight 
It Is now Forasmoche as vppon due examinacyon it is duely proved before 

the Court of the Chauncelour and counsaill of the Courte of augmentacions of 
tions^Sat the reuenues of oure soueraigne lorde the kynges Crowne that the said 
aUpendahaii annuytie or annuall rent of tenne poundes was contynually paied by the 
be paidT Abbott and Covent of the said late monasterye for the tyme being to 
the said Preachoure before and vntill the tyme of the dissolucion of the 
said late monasterye 

And bycause also it is the kynges pleasure that the said Preachoure 
shaU contynue according to the fundacion of the said Chaunterye 

It is therfore ordered and decreed by the said Chaunceloure and 
Counsaill in the terme of the holy Trynytie that is to saye the tenth 
daye of June in the xxxiiij^ yere of the reigne of oure soueraigne lorde 
kynge Henry theight that one Henry Pawley nowe preachoure and his 
successours preachours according to the fundacion of the said Chaun- 
terye conteyned in the said booke indented shall haue and enyoie for 
euer the said annuytie or annuall rent of tenne poimdes sterling to be 
paied by thandes of the Treasorer of the said Courte of Augmentacions 
for the tyme being of suche the kynges treasure of the same augmenta- 
cions as shall remayne in thandes of the same Treausorer at the said 
feastes of Ester and seynt Michaell tharchangell by evyn porcions 

And it is further ordered and decreed by the said Chauncelour und 
Counsell that the said Preachoure shall haue all tharrerages of the 



G^ardenrground of Alice Davers 77 

said annuytie due sithen and from the feaste of seynt Michaell 
tharchaungell in the xxxj*** yere of the reigne of oure soueraigne lorde 
kinge Henry theight to be paied by the handes of the said Treauaorer 
of the treasure aforsaid 

Nos autem tenorem decreti predicti ad requisicionem predicti 
predicatoris duximus exemplificandum per presentes. 

In cuius rei testimonium has literas nostras fieri fecimus patentes 
Teste Ryche milite apud Westmonasteriimi sexto decimo die Jimii 
Anno regni nostri trioesimo quarto ^ 

G. Conveyance from Alice Davers to Samuel Ward, D.D,, 
Lady Margaret's Reader, and to his successors, of a 
garden* in Cambridge, in the Street leading from 
jSf. Benedict's Church to the Pease Market, 14 January^ 
1625. 

This Indenture made the fourteenth day of Januarye, in the first 
yeare of the reigne of our sovereigne Lord Charles, by the grace of 
God King of England, Scotland, France and Ireland, Defender of the 
fayth etc., Annoque Domini 1625, betweene Alice Davers, the relict of 
Jeremy Davers, late of Cambridge, in the county of Cambridge, 
esquier, deceased, of the one partie, and Samuell Ward, Doctor of 
Divinity and Reader of the divinity Lecture founded in the University 
of Cambridge by Margarett, late Countes of Richemond, mother of 
King Henry the Seventh, of the other partie, Witnesseth : 

That the said Alice Davers, aswell owt of her pious disposition to 
advance learning and religion, and to incourage aswell the said Samuell 
Ward as his successors, Readers of the said Lecture for the tyme being, 
in his and their painefiUl dischardging of the duties belonging to the 
said Lecture, by adding some smal meanes of livelihood towards the 
better maintenance of the said Samuel and of his said successors, as 
allsoe for divers other valewable oonsideracions her the said Alice 
thereunto especially moving, hath graunted, bargained and sowld, 
aliened, enfeoffed and confirmed, and by theaae presents doth fully and 
absolutely graunt, baigaine and sell, alien, enfeoffe and confirme vnto 
the said Samuell Ward and his said successors 

All that gardine, place, or parcell of grounde, situate and being in 
the parishe of St. Edward's in Cambridge aforesaid betweene the 
mesuage or tenement called the Phesant Cock nowe or late in the 
tenure of Henry Qooche on the East, and a mesuage or tenement nowe 
or late in the tenure of Robert Pillay or of his assignee or assignees on 
the west, the north head therof abutting on the conmion streete leading 

^ From the original in the Regiiitry of the University, Charten, etc. , Ko. 165. 

* This garden had been sold to Jeremy Davers, of Clare College, A.B. 
1571, A.M. 1575, hasband of Alice Davers, by Stephen Perse, M.D., for 
£40, 8 September, 1613. 



78 Beiiefdctions of the Lady Marga/ret 

from St. Benedict's Churche towards the Peazemarket hill in Gamhridge 
aforesaid, and the south head therof abutting vpon parcell of a tene- 
ment late in the occupacion of Anne EUwyn widdowe or of her 
assignee or assignees, which said gardine, place or parcell of ground 
conteyneth from east to west eleven yards or thereabouts, and from 
north to south nineteen yards or thereabouts 

To have and to howld the said gardine, place or parcell of grounde 
with the appurtenances and all easements, wayes, passages, profitts 
and commodities whatsoever to the same belonging or therewith vsed, 
occupied, possessed or enioyed to the said Samuell Ward and his said 
successors, Readers of the said divinitie Lecture, to the onely proper 
vse and behoufe of him the said Samuell and of his said successors 
for ever. 

And the said Alice Davers doth for herselfe, her heires, executors 
and administrators covenaunte and graunt by thease presents to and 
with the said Samuell Ward and his said successors that shoe, the said 
Alice Davers, and her heires and all persons clayming by from or vnder 
her, the said Alice Davers, shall and will att all tymes within the space 
of seven yeares next ensuing the date of thease presents, vpon the 
reasonable request, and att the costs and chardges in the lawe of the 
said Samuell Ward or of his said successors, make, doe, suffer, execute 
and knowledge all and every such further lawfull and reasonable act 
and acts, thing and things, devise and devises, conveyance and con- 
veyances, and assiurances in the lawe, for the further better or more 
suer making or conveying of the said gardine, place, or parcell of 
ground, with the appurtenances before mentioned, or intended to be 
hereby graunted, bargained and sowld, aliened, enfeoffed and confirmed 
vnto the said Samuell Ward and to his said successors, or vnto any of 
them, as by him the said Samuell or his said successors, or any 
of them, their or any of their counsaile learned in the lawes, shalbe 
reasonably devised or required, be yt by fine, feoffment, recovery, 
deede or deedes inrolled, or by all or any of the said wayes, or by any 
other wayes or meanes whatsoever, soe that the said further securitie 
conteine noe further warranty than against her, the said Alice Davers, 
her heires and assignees, and that she, the said Alice Davers be not 
compelled for the making or doing therof to travell any further than 
the towne of Cambridge aforesaid. All which fine or fines and further 
assurance are by thease presents declared, and the said parties to 
thease presents doe mutually hereby covenaunt eache with other, that 
the same shalbe to the onely vse herinbefore specified and to none 
other vse intent or purpose whatsoever. 

In witness wherof the said parties to thease presents interchange- 
ably haue put their handes and seales the day and yeare first above 

written*. 

(Signed) ALICE DAVERS. 

1 From the original in the Begistiy of the University, Charters, etc., 
No. 174 (31). 



Letter of King Charles the Second 79 

H. Letter of King Charles the Second, dispensing the Lady 
Margaret* s Preacher from delivering sermons except in 
the University, 30 October, 1679. 

Charlbs R Trusty and welbeloved, wee greet you well. 

Whereas the Lady Margaret, late Countisse of Richmond and 
Derby, in her Foundation of a Preacher in that Oiu* University, did 
oblige him to preach at twelve or thirteen severall Townes in severall 
Counties, and accordingly did allow him what was in those days a 
competent Salary and sufficient for the discharging of the expences of 
his journey : Wee, understanding that the Salary of the said Preacher 
is now very small and inconsiderable, and therefore being disposed to 
free him from the said expensive duties, have thought fitt and accord- 
ingly do hereby dispence with all those that shall be her Preacher for 
the future, for their not preaching at the {>laces aforesaid. Provided 
that they doe all other exercises in the University unto which by the 
said Foundation or Custome they are obliged. And Our pleasure also 
is, that you alter the Oath, which the said Preachers at their entrance 
were to take according to these Premisses : And that you cause these 
Our Royall Letters of Dispensation to be registred in the University 
Roister as the Rule to be observed for the future as to the Foundation 
aforesaid. And for soe doing this shall be your warrant. And soe wee 
bid you farewell. 

Given at Our Qowrt at Whitehall, the 30th day of October, 1679, in 
the 31st yeare of our Reigne. 

By His Majesty's command, 

Sunderland*. 

To our Trusty and welbeloved the Vicechancellour of 
Our University of Cambridge to be communicated 
to the Senate there. 



2. Benefaction of Thomas Plume, 
1704. 

a. Observatory. 

6. Professorship. 

c. Provision of instruments. 
The Reverend Thomas Plume, of Christ's College, A.B. 
1649, B.D. (by royal mandate) 1661, D.D. 1673, Vicar of 
Greenwich and Archdeacon of Rochester, by Will (A) dated 

> From a copy in the Registry of the Univerflity, *' Tabor's Book," p. 681. 



80 Benefaction of Thomas Plume 

2 September, 1704, bequeathed about £1900 for the following 
objects: (1) to build an Observatory; (2) to maintain a 
Professor of Astronomy and Experimental Philosophy, for 
whose use instruments were to be bought, and a house in or 
near the Observatory bought or built. Orders for his lectures 
are next given ; and lastly, the care of composing statutes, 
if the testator does not do so himself, is entrusted to Dr 
Francis Thompson, Dr Covel, Master of Christ's College, the 
Lucasian Professor for the time being, Dr Bentley, Master 
of Trinity College (with the advice of Sir Isaac Newton), 
Sir John Ellis, Master of Gonville and Caius College, and 
Mr Flamsteed, the Astronomer Royal. 

Plume died 20 November, 1704, and his Will was proved 

3 March, 1704-5. Before the end of the year 1705 the 
trustees were able to assure James Plume (executor to 
Dr Plume) that a suitable estate had been found at Balsham 
in Cambridgeshire, in consequence of which representation 
he supplied them with funds to pay for it^ 

The trustees next turned their attention to the Obser- 
vatory, and in February 1705-6 the Master and Seniors of 
Trinity College granted the rooms and leads over their Great 
Gate as a dwelling and Observatory for the Professor (B)*. 
It had evidently been already decided that the oflSce was to 
be conferred on Roger Cotes, M.A., Fellow of Trinity College; 
for in the above document he is described as " nominated to 
the Professorship," and in the instrument of his election, 
dated 16 October, 1707, the trustees speak of themselves as 
"impowered by Her Majesty's Letters Patent*." It may 
therefore be assumed that they waited for this formal recog- 
nition of their powers before proceeding to the first election. 

The statutes, drawn up £is the Will directs, regulate the 
mode of electing the Professor, his duties, observations, and 
teaching. Among other things he is to bestow £5 yearly, 
with board and lodging, on a scholar, who is to be a proficient 

^ Deed dated 21 December, 1705, between the truBtees and James Plume, 
in the Begistry of the University, Vol. xxzix. 12. 2. 

' ArcK Hist, of Univ, and ColL ill. 190^—198, where a view of the 
building is given. 

• Registry, Vol. xxxix. 12. 8. 



Benefaction of Thomas Plume 81 

in Astronomy and assist him in his work. He is also to 
keep the Observatory and dwelling-house in repair at his 
own charges, and to spend £5 yearly on instruments. When 
the trustees had finished their work, they petitioned Queen 
Anne for an expression of her approval. She accordingly 
issued letters patent (C), dated 11 Jime, 1707, in which the 
statutes, and other things, done by the trustees, are rehearsed 
and ratified. 

In 1710 (1 July) a Grace jteussed the Senate that Dr 
Plume's name, as founder of a Professorship of Astronomy, 
should be included in the list of benefactors ; and a similar 
Grace, but more detailed, passed in 1718 (9 June)^. 

In 1768 the salary of the Professor was augmented by a 
benefiaction under the Will of Robert Smith, D.D., Master 
of Trinity College, who had been Plumian Professor 1716- 
1760« 

In 1832 (2 November) the purchase of two closes of 
land at Balsham, adjacent to the Plumian estate, for £420, 
was authorised by the University*. 

The extent of the estate is given in the Schedule printed 
below (D)*. 

In 1869 the University Property Syndicate, in a Report 
dated 1 May, recommended " that an application be made to 
the Court of Chancery to convey the legal estate of the 
Plumian property at Balsham to the Chancellor, Masters, 
and Scholars of the University, to be held in trust for the 
Plumian Professor." This recommendation having been con- 
firmed by Grace (13 May), an order of the Court, dated 
3 July, granted the prayer of the petitioners'. 

A new Statute for the Professorship was firamed by the 
Council of the Senate 21 October, 1857, and re-issued 

1 Grace Book 6, 577, 686. 

3 See below, p. 95. 

s Grace Book N, p. 395. 

* From the deed executed by Bev. Ja. Ghallis, 1873 : see below. 

* A copy of thifl Order is in the Begistry of the UniverBity, Vol. zzziz. 
12. 37 (5) ; as is the deed by which the Bev. Ja. Challis, Plamian Professor, 
conveyed his interest in the estate to the University, 2 January, 1873. This 
deed is printed in EndowmenU, ed. 1876, p. 112 (38). 

C. 6 



82 Benefaction of Thomas Plume 

16 November, 1867. It was approved by the Senate 
26 November, and having been adopted with some changes 
by the Commissioners, was approved by the Queen in 
Council 7 March, 1860 ^ 



A. Extract from the Will of Dr Plvme, 
dated 2 Septembet\ 1704. 

Amount of I HAVE in the Bank of England one Thousand pounds and in the 

qtm^ed. Chamber of London Orphan Stock seaven hundred pounds principall 
money. ..and alsoe two hundred and two pounds twelve shillings and two 
pence... 
to* ^tflTST*' "^^ these summes I give and bequeath to erect an Observatory, 
buQt and to maintaine a studious and learned Professor of Astronomy and 

A ProfeflBor ezperimentall Philosophy, and to buy him and his successors Vtensills 
elected. and Instruments Quadrants Telescopes etc., and to buy or rent or 
and booM to build an house with or neare the said Observatory ; which Observatory 
fe^K***** is to preserve the said Instruments in from time to time for the use 
of the said Professor for the time being and the house to reside in, or, 
He may let if he be resident in a College, to let, and to reserve the rent for himselfe, 
provided he but soe as any ingenious Scholars or Gentlemen may resort to him at 
at hand^to all proper Seasons to be instructed and improved by him in the know- 
gve inrtruc- j^^^ ^^ Astronomy the Globes Navigation naturall Philosophy dialling 

and other practicall parts of the Mathematicks in or near Cambridge 

i«cturee to And that he be oblidged to read in the Latin tongue one Jjecture 

every Terme, or at least two in every yeare, makeing or procureing a 

suitable Oration in Latin before each Lecture to recommend the said 

^rintod Sciences to the Study of his Auditory, and to print or leave a faire 

oepoaitedin Manuscript in Quarto, one Coppy every yeare, in the University 

library. Library of such Lecture to be preserved there among theire Archives, 

and to be bound up together when they shall come to a fit Volume by 

himselfe or his next successor as they were delivered in the Ph3rsick 

Schooles or elsewhere according to the appointment of the Vice 

Chancellor. 

SyenQr^heT ^ *^® reading of which Lecture I desire the Beadles to give notice 

ieotaz«. in every College viva voce as they doe for Conciones ad Clerum for 

which the Professor shall content them, or else shall cause only the 

Schoole Bell to be rung or both as the Vice Chancellor shall order. 

TnwtoeB^ And I will that Dr Francis Thompson, Dr Covell Master of Christs 

to draw up Colledge and his successors there, the Mathematick Professor for the 

time being, Dr Bentley Master of Trin. Coll. with the advice of 

Mr Newtin (nc) in London, Mr John EUys Custos of Caius Colledge, 

and Mr Flamsted the Royall Mathematician at East Greenwich, or 

1 Statutes, ed. 1896, p. 98. 



Btetntet. 



First Observatory 83 

theire Survivors, shall constitute make or alter such Statutes and 
orders for the Election Residence qualifications and performances as 
shall be most requisite for the perpetuation and benefitt of the said 
Professor, and the Improvement of Astronomy and naturall Philosophy, 
enjoyning him to keepe a Boy or two to assist him in his observations 
and teach them Physicks Mathematicks Navigation and Astronomy if 
I settle not those Statutes myselfe. 

I will that the principall money be not removed from the Bank till JJ^*J^S* 
they have a very good purchase to make with it^. oat ofbank 

pazchMels 

B. Covenant of the Master and Seniors of Trinity 

College, 9 February, 1705-6. 

Wee the Master and Seniors of Trinity College in Cambridge doe 
covenant and agree with the Trustees or Electors for the Professorship 
of Astronomy and Experimental Philosophy lately founded by Dr Plume ; 
That Roger Cotes, Fellow of this College, now nominated to the said 
Professorship, and all his successors after him, of what College or place 
soever they shall be, shall have the roomes and leads of the King's Gate 
of this College, for a dwelling and observatory soe long as the Trustees 
and Electors of the said Professorship shall think fit; the Professors 
paying frt>m time to time ten poundes per annum to the Fellow, whose 
chamber it shall be in the College course. Provided allways, while they 
shall use the King's Gate for the Observatory, that the Scholar 
appointed to be the Professor's Assistant and to lodg in the same 
dwelling with him, be one of this College, to be chosen by the Professor 
with the consent of the Master. In testimony whereof wee have affixed 
hereunto the College Seale the nynth day of February, anno Domini 
1705«. 

C. Letters Patent of Queen Anne, 11 Jwne, 1707. 

Anka [etc.] Cum fideles et dilecti nobis Johannes Cove! Sacrae Dr Corel. 

T)p fiittltlAV 

Theologiae Doctor et Magister CoUegii Christi in Universitate nostra and Mr 

Cantabrigiae, Ricardus Bentley Sacrae Theologiae Doctor et Magister haTerepra- 

Collegii Sanctae Trinitatis ibidem, Gulielmus Whiston Artium Magister ■«»*** *®^" 
et Matheeeos Professor Lucasianus ibidem, per petitionem suam nobis 
humillime representaverint : 

Quod Thomas Plume Sacrae Theologiae Doctor et Archidiaconus thatDr 

Roffensis nuper defiinctus per testamentum et ultimam voluntatem lenatwat 

suam legaverit drciter mille et quingentas libras ezpendendas pro i^tm^^^ 

emptione terrarum in perpetuam manutentionem Professoris Astro- So?S"» 
nomiae et Philosophiae Experimentalis in Universitate nostr^ praedictft. 



Pxofaaiorof 
Astronomy, 



> Copied at the Registry of Wills, Somerset HouBe, London. 

' Collated with the originai in the BeglBtry of the Univeraity, Vol. xxxix. 12. 4. 

6—2 



84 



Benefaction of Thomas Plmne 



uid ap- 
pointed the 
aforesaid 
penons 
with Dr F. 
Thompson 
to bay the 
■aid land 
and draft 
statutes, 

which land 
haebeen 
bought at 
BaLBham, 
and which 
statatee 
have been 
drafted. 

Preamble. 



Statementof 
Dr Plune'B 
Wili 



Sir John 
Ellifl, Sir I. 
Newton, and 
Mr John 
Flamstead 
to be con- 
sulted. 



The yearly 
rent of the 
land at Bal- 
shamtobe 
raid to the 



foroniain 
purposea 

The Pro- 
fessor to pay 
£5 yearly to 
a scholar 
learned in 
astronomy, 
who is to 
board and 
lodge in his 
house, and 
assist nim; 



ac praefatum Johannem Covel, Ricardmu Bentley, et Gulielmum 
Whiston, et quendam Franciscmu Thompson Sacrae Theologiae 
Doctorem fiduciarios suos pro emptione et dispositione talium ter- 
rarum ac ad componendam quandam fonnam statutorum pro electiooe 
qualificatione et officio talis Professoris imperpetumu fore constituit ; 

Quodque ipsi secundum tenorem et formam ultimae voluntatis prae- 
dictae quasdam terras apud Balsham in comitatu nostro Gantabrigiae 
emissent ; ac easdem officio Professoris praedicti annexissent, ac etiam 
quandam formam statutorum, ut praefertur, composuissent, quae 
quidem statuta sequuntur in haec verba, viz. 

Omnibus Christi fidelibus ad quos hoc praesens scriptum per- 
venerit, Johannes Covel Sacrae Theologiae Doctor et Magister CoUegii 
Christi Cantabrigiae, Francisciia Thom|)son Sacrae Theologiae Doctor, 
Ricardus Bentley Sacrae Theologiae Doctor et Magister CoUegii Sanctae 
Trinitatis, et Gulielmxis Whiston Artium Magister ' et Matheseos 
Professor Lucasianus fidei commissarii pro parte ultimi testamenti 
Reverendi viri Tho. Plume Sacrae Theologiae Doctoris et Archidiaconi 
Roffensis nupec defuncti, salutem in Domino sempitcmam. 

Noveritis quod cum dictus Reverendus vir Thomas Plume ex pro- 
penso suo in Academiam Cantabrigiensem et rem literariam affectu, 
pecuniam ad libras circiter mille et octingentas supremo suo testamento 
legaverit, imde tantum terrae sive fimdi emeretur quantum, per annuos 
reditus ad perpetuum stipendium Professoris Astronomiae et Philo- 
sophiae Experimentalis sufficeret, et praeterea unde Observatorium, 
Domus, et Instrumenta, ad munus illud exequendum necessaria com- 
parari possint : atque insuper eodem testamento mandaverit, ut nos 
dicti tidei commissarii adhibito celeberrimorum virorum Johannis EUis 
Equitis, Isaaci Newton Equitis, Johannis Flamstead Astronomi Regii 
consilio ordinationes et statuta faceremus, quibus dictus Professor 
perpetuis fiituris temporibus eligi, et electus obstringi et obtemperare 
debeat 

Nos igitur dicti fidei commissarii, adhibito prius dictorum virorum 
consilio, ordinationes infra scriptas approbamus, omniaque per dicti 
Thomae Plume testamentum nobis concessft authoritate rata esse 
volumus et declaramus. 

Statuimus imprimis et ordinamus, ut quicquid annul reditus, ex 
terris sive fundis apud Balsham in Agro Cantabrigiensi ad usimi 
praedictum emptis et acquisitis qu4cunque just& ratione accreverit 
illud integrum cedat in emolumentum et praemium Professoris Astro- 
nomiae et Philosophiae Experimentalis, sub conditionibus mox expri- 
mendis electi et constituti, exceptis duntaxat iis pecuniis, quas ad 
sustentandum Scholarem, ad Instrumenta comparanda, et ad Domum 
Observatoriumque erogari volumus, nempe ad alendum unum Scholarem 
Astronomiae peritum qui^per dictum Professorem eligatur ut in obser- 
vationibus experimentisque faciendis opituletur ei et subveniat, e&que 
caus& in Professoris Domo cubiculiun gratis habeat, quinque libras 



StcUutes approved by Queen Anne 85 

quotanniB a dicio Profeasore solvendas esse decemimua, et quinque ^^P^qIq. 
pariter libras singulis annis in instrumenta ab eo impendi, Obeerva- ■tmmente. 
torium vero et domum conduci, et quotiescunque opus fiierit re- 2^*2*"^ 
parari volumus sumptibus Professoris, arbitrioque electonim qui tunc ' y^^J ^ 
fiierint. ^nd a hooMb 

Porro omnia instrumenta, quae ad usus praedictos vel empta vel ^JJ^^^ 
donata fiierint, in indiculo sive inventorio describi et recenseri cujus ^5jA*l,jj^ 
unum exemplar penes Procancellarium erit ; et si quae eorum n^gli- SSe Vioe- 
gentia Professons vel amitti vel comimpi contigent, ea smgula ejus j^^^^ 
sumptibus vel oomparari denuo vel resarciri et refici volumus. £^1!^^ 

Quod ad officium et munus dicti Professoris attinet, declaramus et good by the 
statuimus, ut singulis annis binas praelectiones vel orationes de Astro- Heis to give 
nomi& vel Philosophic ezperimentali Latine habeat in scholis publicis, JJIjJ^U *** 
loco et tempore per Procancellarium praescribendo, diem autem et 
horam per Bedellos singulis Gollegiis subinde significari Procanoellarius 
pro su4 authoritate curabit 

Statuimus insuper ut dictus Professor praeter alia ipsius arbitrio ^^j^* 
judicioque permittenda, iis potissimum observationibus diligenter ^^^^^' 
inciuubat, quae ad Astronomiam promovendam perficiendamque, pro obsenra- 
variis hujus scientiae incrementis, et saeculorum progressu desiderari 
videbuntur, qualia hodie habentur haec sequentia, ut cometae onmes, 
quotiescunque in his oris conspicui fiierint, accurate observentur, eorum 
longitudines et latitudines computentur, orbesque ex calculo deter- 
minentur ; novae etiam stellae, si quae forte apparuerint, sedulo notentur ; 
Mercurii item et Veneris transitus supra Solem; Solis, Lunae, Jovisque, 
et ejus Satellitum EcUpses ; Lunae loca apparentia et diametri in 
ejus quadratmns et nonnunquam in octantibus et oppositionibus, 
Satumi, Jovis, Martisque loca in eorum oppositionibus et nonnunquam 
in quadraturis; Veneris et Mercurii maxime a Sole elongationes, Jovis 
et Satumi conjunctiones, Solis et Stellae alicujus fixae rectarum 
ascensionum differantia, cum Sol in suo apogeo vel perigee vel 
mediis distantiis fuerit, Veneris etiam et Solis rectarum ascensionum 
differentia, cum Venus in suo perigee vel prope id fuerit 

Inque hisce Observationibus faciendis res ipsa postulare videtur, ut J^^/^jL^ 
Professor sextantem quadrupedalis saltem radii, et telescopium duo- menta. 
decim minimum pedum vel quatuordecim cum micrometre adhibeat, 
atque alia porro instrumenta quae usus rerum magister, et astrono- 
morum solertia posthac invenerit. Quin et horologium suum castiget 
et constituat, ad transitus stellarum fixarum supra aperturam fixi 
perspicilli, atque inde observationum suarum verum tempus computet 
et definiat 

Volumus praeterea ut singulorum annorum observationes, ut et 
binas illas praelectiones sive orationes, Uteris mandet, atque intra annum 
proximum earum exemplar nitide descriptum Procanoellario exhibeat, 
in Academiae archivis servandum, et cum electoribus visum fuerit, 
typis et prelo committendum. 



86 



Benefaction of Thomas Plume 



Penalty for 
nefflect of 
duty. 



To hold 

clMiesof 

stadenta. 



who are to 
pay fees for 

inBtnictlon. 



TheLuca- 
BlanPro- 
feoBor to 



FliBt elec- 
tion of a 
ProfesBor 
to be made 
by the 



afterwards 
bytheV.-C, 
and the 
Masters of 
Trinity, 
ChristV and 
Caius, and 
theLucasian 
Professor; 
to whom, if 
one of them 
should be 
V.C. is to 
be added the 
Master of 
8. John's. 

Rules for the 
election. 

Who may be 
candidates. 



What is to 
be done if 
the electors 
cannot 
agree. 



Admission 
of the Pro- 
fessor after 
election. 



Quod si in Mc ro negligcns fuerit, neque a Procanccllario monitufi 
huic ordinationi jMiruerit, Professoris munere et beneficio per majorem 
partem electorum omuino privetur. In caeteris si parum honeste et 
diligenter se geaserit, aut si diutius, quam par est, ex Academic 
abfuerit, electorum arbitrio, vel pecunift mulctetur vel munere 
privetur. 

Porro ut studentium in academic commodis et scientiarum incre- 
mento magis indies magisque consulatur, volumus et deoemimus, ut per 
singulos amios, quoties pro numero studiosorum commode fieri poterit, 
varios cursus sive collegia domi suae vel in publico habeat, in astrono- 
micis, opticis, trigonometricis, mechanicis, staticis, hydrostaticis, 
magneticis, pneumaticis, atque aliis id genus, quae ad Philosophiam 
Experimentalem illustrandam et tradendam pertinent; Atque ut 
singuli, qui ciursum aliquem ingressuros se profitentur, tantum pecuniae 
dicto Professori solvant, ad experimentorum impensas et laboris 
praemium, quantum Procancellario commodum esse videbitur. 

Optandum autem fuerit, si (quod Deus fskxit) preclara haec studia 
progressus in academic debitos fecerint, ut Professor Mathematicae 
Lucasianus, ima cum Professore nostro junctis operibus collegia haec 
habeant, et impensas simul meroedesque laborum communium aequis 
partibus inter se dividant. 

Caeterum Professoris eligendi potestas h&c prim& vice esto penes 
nos fidei commissarios, postea vero quotioscunque hoc munus vacaverit, 
penes ProcanceUarium, Magistros CoUegiorum Sanctae Trinitatis, 
Christi, Caii, et Professorem Lucasianum. Quod si aliquis ex Magistris 
horum CoUegiorum Procancellarius tmic fuerit, in electorum numerum 
e& vice assumatur Magister Collegii Sancti Johannis. Munere vero 
Professoris qu4cunquo de caus& vacante, Procanoellarii erit^ quam 
primum fieri i)oterit, schedule scholarum publicarum ostio affix&, tam 
de vaoatione ips&, quam de futuiue electionis die certiores omnes facere. 
Tempus autem electionis neque ante tricesimum post schedulam affixam 
diem incipi, neque ultra sexagesimum protrahi volumus. Electores 
autem in scholam publicam convenientes, jurejurando se obstringant se 
neminem gratis, ambitionc, vel praemio inductos, sed eum solum, quem 
conscienti& teste huic muneri maxime idonemn censuerint, electuros. 
Petitiouem vero omnibus liberam esse volumus, seu coelebes sint, seu 
mariti, seu nostrates, sive exteri et peregrini, modo sint et doctrin^ 
idonei, et vitae morumque integri. Licebit etiam cuilibet electorum' 
quemlibet ex petitoribus, vel per sc vel i)er alios examinaro, quo certius 
aequiusque in eligendo suffragium ferre possit Is porro electus 
habeatur in qucm tria minimum sufiragia conspiraverint Quod si tres 
ex eleotoribus ne die quidem scxagesimo de uno eligendo consenserint, 
is demum pro electo habeatur, quem Caucellarius Academiae cum 
duobus quibusvis electorum suffiugiis suis dignati fuerint. Electus 
autem statim a Procancellario admittatur, jurejurando prius dato, se 
munus Professoris Astronomiae et Philosophiae Experimentalis, a 



StattUes approved by Queen Amie 87 

Reverendo viro Tho. Plume in hftc Academift iostitutum, secundum 
ordinatioues de eo conditos fideliter et pro virili exequuturum. 

In cujuB rei testimonium, nos dicti fidei commissarii, sigilla nostra 
praesenti scripto apposuimus, die dedmo quarto Januarii, Anno Begni 
serenissimae Reginae Annae quinto, Annoque Domini millesimo septin- 
gentesimo sexto: Johannes Covell, Richardus Bentley, Qulielmus 
Whiston. 

Cumque praefatus Johannes Covel, Richardus Bentlej, et Gulielmus 
Whiston per Petitionem suam praedictam nobis supplicaverint per 
literas nostras patentes statuta praedicta ratificare et confirmare ac 
potestatem dare Procancellario Universitatis nostrae praedictae tam 
electoribus Professoris quam Professori electo sacramentum adminis- 
trare ; quodque praedictus Professor, si socius fuerit alicujus Gollegii 
tempore electionis ejus, officium Socii una cum officio Professoris 
habeat, et retineat dum coelebs maneat; et si non fuerit Socius 
alicujus CoUegii et coelebs sit, Socius alicujus Collegii eum eligere 
volentis eligatur et admittatur ; 

Sciatis modo quod nos ex oeriA scientift et mero motu noetris BattflcatloB 
ratificavimus, approbavimus et confirmavimus, ac per praesentes, pro oedlng^ 
nobis haeredibus et successoribus nostris ratificamus approbamus et patent, 
confirmamus ordinationes et statuta praedicta ac omnia et singula 
privilegia potestates authoritates et advantagias quascunque in eisdem 
contentas et specificatas. 

Et ulterius volmnus ac per praesentes ^o nobis haeredibus et i^Pf^\^7 
successoribus nostris plenam potestatem et authoritatem damns et tend to both 
concedimus Procancellario Universitatis nostrae praedictae nunc et pro Siaotod. 
tempore existenti sacramentum in eisdem statutis mentionatum ad- 
ministrandum. 

Yolumus insuper quod quilibet talis Professor juxta statuta prae- The Pro- 
dicta eligendus, si tempore electionis ejus socius fuerit alicujus Collegii be FeUow of 
officium Socii una cum officio Professoris habeat et retineat dum coelebs t bechlior. 
maneat, si vero adhuc non fuerit Socius et coelebs sit, Socius alicujus 
Gollegii eum eligere volentis eligatur et admittatur. 

Denique volumus ac per praesentes pro nobis haeredibus et succes- 
soribus nostris concedimus, quod hae Literae nostrae Patentes vel 
irrotulamenta earundem erunt in omnibus et per omnia bona, firma, 
valida, sufficientia et effectualia in lege ngn obstante male recitante 
vel non recte vel plene recitante praedictum Testamentum et ultimam 
voluntatem praedicti Tho. Plume et ordinationes et statuta praedicta 
sive aliquam partem earundem, aut aliquam aliam omissione, imper- 
fectione, defectu, re, c<iU8d, vol materia qu^imque in aliquo non 
obstante. 

In cujus rei testimonium has Literas nostras fieri fecimus Patentee. 
Teste meipe& apud Westmonasterium undecimo die Junii Anno Regni 
nostri sexto ^ Per Breve de Private SigiUo. 

^ Collated with the original in the Registry of the University, zxxix. 12. 4. 



88 Phimian Estate at, Bcilsham 



D. Schedule of the estate at Balsham. 

First Part. All those 3^ acres part of 107a. 3r. I2p. allotted 
on enclosure to the late Samuel Yince and which 3^ acres were 
awarded in lieu of 2 acres of Meadow called Turner's Meadow 
and 1^ acres in Ashby and also all that parcel of pasture called 
Copthall which said piece or parcel of land called Copthall contains 
upon the admeasurement thereof upon the Inclosure of the Parish 
of Balsham in the said County of Cambridge 6a. Or. 36/?. And also 
all that close of land called by the name of The Severals upon the 
admeasurement thereof upon the said Inclosure containing 8a. Ir. 26p. 
And also all that close of pasture called Patricks containing upon an 
admeasurement thereof 5a. Ir. lOp, and also all that piece or parcel 
of old inclosed land or ground called or known by the name of Cobdhall 
otherwise Cobshall lying and being in Balsham aforesaid contaming 
by estimation 3 acres but by admeasurement 4a. 3r. 2p. and numbered 
72 on the plan annexed to the Award of the Commissioners for inclosing 
the Parish of Balsham aforesaid And also all that other piece or 
parcel of old inclosed land or ground called or known by the name of 
Cobshall or Washdall Field lying and being in Balsham aforesaid 
containing by admeasurement 9a. Or. lOp. and numbered 73 on the 
aforesaid plan And also all that other piece or parcel of old inclosed 
land or ground called or known by the name of New England lying and 
being in Balsham aforesaid containing by estimation 5 acres but by 
admeasurement 5a. 2r. Op. and numbered 75 on the said plan And 
also all that other piece or parcel of old inclosed land or ground 
lying and being in Balsham aforesaid containing by admeasurement 
la. Ir. 21p. and nimibered 74 on the aforesaid plan all which said 
4 last described closes of land contain together by admeasurement 
14a. 2r. 39p. and are bounded on the North by Bavies Lane and on 
all other parts by lands belonging to the Trustees of the Plumian 
Professorship. 

Second Part. Certain Lands lately held freely of the Lords of the 
said Manor of Balsham by a yearly rent of £1. U. 4d. and a relief of 
£1. Is. 4d. but Enfranchised and released by the hereinbefore recited 
Deed of Enfranchisement 



BenefcLction of William Worts 89 

3. Benefaction of William Worts, 
1709. 

a. Gift to Charity Schools. 

6. Galleries in Great S. Mary's Church. 

c. Causeway. 

d. Travelling bachelors. 

e. University Library. 

Mr William Worts of Catharine Hall, A.B. 1698, A.M. 
1702, who died in 1709^, by Will dated 21 June, 1709 (see 
below), bequeathed his estate to five trustees for the following 
purposes : (1) to pay £30 yearly to the Charity Schools in 
Cambridge ; (2) to build galleries in Great S. Mary's Church 
for use of Bachelors and Undergraduates; (3) to make a 
causey from Emmanuel College to the Hills; (4) to pay 
£100 a year to each of two Bachelors who are to travel in 
foreign countries and send home reports of what they ob- 
serve ; (5) the residue to be paid to the University Library. 

A new statute for the Travelling Bachelors was approved 
by the Queen in Council 16 April, 1861^; and by Statute B, 
approved 29 June, 1882', it was provided that the manage- 
ment and administration of the property of the endowment 
should be vested in the University. In 1884 (6 Nov.) the 
following Grace passed the Senate : 

That on the recommendation of the Worts' Trustees and the 
Financial Board, the necessary steps be taken for obtaining the transfer 
to the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of the legal 
estate in the property belonging to the Worts' Trust, now vested in the 
Trustees. 

In 1887 however (14 March) the Vice-Chancellor informed 
the Senate : 

that in pursuance of Grace 1 of November 6, 1884, application was 
made on the 26th ultimo to the Chancery Division of the High Court 

^ The Will was proved in the Vice-Chanoellor's court 10 Aug. 1709. 
See copy, by Dr Philpott, of MS. notes by Dr Parria (Univ. Reg. Vol. xlii. 1. 
3) who was a trustee in the years 1756-1760. 

> Statutes, ed. 1896, p. 110. 

s Ibid. p. 62. 



90 



Benefaction of William Worts 



of Justice for obtainiDg the transfer to the Chancellor, Maaters and 
Scholars of the University of the legal estate in the property belonging 
to the Worts' Trust, now vested in the Trustees, but on the hearing 
of the Petition the Judge declined to make the order prayed for on the 
ground that the CJourt had no power or jurisdiction in the matter^ 



Will of William Worts, dated 21 June, 1709. 

In the Name of God, Amen. I William Worts, of Cambridge, in 
the County of Cambridge, Esqr., being of a perfect, sound, and disposing 
Mind and Memory, do make this my last Will and Testament in 
manner and form following: 



WUltobe 

proTedin 

vloe-CbAxi- 

cellor'g 

oourt 



£30 a year 
to the 
Charity 
Schools in 
Gainbridg& 



Appoint- 
ment of 
tniBteesto 
hold the 
testator's 
real estate. 



Item, I will and appoint that my Executrix prove this my last Will 
and Testament in the Vice-Chancellor's Court of the University of 
Cambridge within a month after my decease, and that she there and 
then deUver in upon oath a true and perfect particular and valuation 
of all the Lands, Moneys, Bonds, Mortgages, and Debts owing to me 
from private persons, and from the Exchequer.... 

And I also will and appoint that my said Aunt Anne Daye shall 
every year, during her life, by equal quarterly payments, pay the sum 
of £30, without any deduction of Taxes by Parliament or otherwise, to 
the use of the poor children, which now are or shall hereafter be taught 
in the several schools in Cambridge aforesaid, commonly called The 
Charity Schools, lately set up chiefly by the care of the pious and 
learned Mr. Whiston, the first payment to be made on such of the 
Quarter-days abovementioned, as shall next happen after my death : 
the said payment, and all the subsequent payments to be made to the 
person, who, for the time being, collects the subscriptions to the said 
Schools, and the said £30 a-year to be applied in the same manner 
as the money collected from the said subscriptions is and shall be 
applied. 

And from and after the decease of the said Anne Daye,... I give, 
devise, and bequeath all my Manors, Messuages, Lands, Tenements, 
and Hereditaments in Landbeche aforesaid, and also my two houses in 
King's College Lane, to Dr. Roderick, Provost of King's College ; 
Dr. Bentley, Master of Trinity College ; Dr. James, Master of Queens' 
College; Dr. Co veil. Master of Christ's College; and Sir John Ellis, 
Master of Qonville and Caius College in Cambridge; and their Heirs 
and Assigns for ever; nevertheless upon such special trust and con- 
fidence in them reposed, as shall be hereinafter declared concerning the 
same. 

* Camh. Univ. Reporter, 16 March, 1887, p. 506. 

3 The omitted passages contain bequests to private persons. The whole 
Will is printed in EndowvunU, ed. 1876, p. 238. 



GcUleries in Great S. Mary's Church 91 



Item, I give and bequeath unto the said four Doctors and Sir John 
Ellis the sum of £3,000, to be paid them by my Executrix, within six 
months after my death, in ready-money, or by assignment to them of 
any of my Mortgages, Tallies, or Orders or in any other manner 
as to them shall seem good and effectual payment ; upon such special 
trust and confidence nevertheless reposed in them as shall be here- 
inafter declared concerning the same: That is to say, as for and 
concerning the said £3,000, upon this special trust and confidence, 
That the said four Doctors and Sir John Ellis, or the survivors of 
them, or the Executors or Administrators of the survivor of them, out 
of the Interest Money and Improvement made thereof, shall, in the 
first place, pay or cause to be paid unto my said Aunt Anne Daye 
every year during her natural life the sum of £150 at two payments in 
the year, that is to say, on the Feast of the Annunciation of the 
Blessed Virgin Maiy, and on the Feast of St. Michael the Archangel, 
by equal portions, the first payment thereof to be made on such of the 
said Feasts as shall next happen after I have been dead a full year: 
and from and after the decease of my said Aunt Daye, then, as well 
concerning my real Estate in Landbeche and King's College Lane, and 
also my personal Estate, which I have devised to the four Doctors and 
Sir John Ellis, and the Trusts thereof, I do hereby declare and appoint, 
That they, or the siurivors of them, or the Executors or Administrators 
of the survivor of them, so long as the said Charity Schools shall 
endure and be kept up in any reputation, shall, in the first place, 
constantly pay the said sum of £30 a year to their use, in such manner 
as my said Aunt Anne Daye is herein before apiK>inted to pay the 
same ; and also all the Annuities herein before by me given that shall 
remain due and payable after the death of my said Aunt Anne Daye, 
except those that I have obliged my said Aunt to give bond for. 

In the next place I appoint and desire that the aiuiual income both 
of my said Lands and Money and the Improvement thereof be 
managed to the best advantage till the sum of £1,600 be raised there- 
from, with which I desire that with all convenient speed after the same 
is so raised Galleries be built in Great St. Mary's Church in Cambridge, 
for the use of the Bachelors of Arts and TJnder-graduates in the 
University, that they may the more decently and conveniently hear 
the Sermon ^ 

And when these Galleries are finished, I appoint and desire, as soon 
as another £1,500 can be raised out of the annual income of my said 
Lands and Money and the Improvements thereof, that it may be 

1 These galleries were erected in 1735, at a total cost of £690. 14«. 0(2., 
under the supervision of James Gibbs, architect, who received £10. IO0. Od. 
*'for discassing the plan, setting the estimate, and going down to Cambridge 
to view the galleries and signing a certificate of the work being done agree- 
able to the said plan and estimate amoanting to £676." AcccunU of the 
WorU TrusUet. 



And also 
£3000 per- 
Bonaltj. 



The annuity 
to the 
Charity 
Schools to be 
continued. 



Galleriee to 
be built in 
Great 
S. Blary'a 
Church for 
the use of 
Bachelors of 
Arts and 
Under- 
graduates. 



92 



Travelling Bachelors, Libra^Tf 



CMiieway 
to be made 
from £mm. 

coato 



£40 to b e 
iceoivod for 
mftinten- 
anoe of the 
OaUeriee. 



£100 a year 
for three 
years to 
each of two 
Bachelors 
who are to 
visit foreign 
coantries. 



Residue to 
be applied 
to the use 
of the Vni- 
▼ersity Li- 
bimry. 



When two 
or more 
trustees are 



applied io the making a Galcey or Causeway from Emmanuel College 
to Hogmagog, alicu Qogmagog Hills ; and I desire, if there be oocadsdon, 
that an Act of Parliament may be procured for the making and 
securing that Road; 

And when it is finished, I desire that £40 a-year be laid aside for 
the maintenance and repairs of that and the said Qalleriee in St. Mary's 
Church, and expended from time to time as there shall be occasion, in 
such proportions to each as the Trustees or major part of them shall 
think fit; 

And as soon as the said Galleries are finished, I further appoint and 
desire that there be allowed annual Pensions of £100 a-year each to 
two young Bachelors of Arts, who shall be sent into foreign coimtries 
soon after they have taken that Degree, and shall continue there for 
the space of three years, but be obliged to take different roads, as they 
shall be appointed by the said Trustees, or the major part of them. 
They shall each of them likewise be obliged to write once in a month 
a letter in Latin to the yioe-Chancellor of the said University, who 
shall communicate them to the Regent-House, and leave them fairly 
written to be lodged in the Public Library among the MSS. there. In 
those letters they shall give an account to the University of the 
religion, learning, laws, politics, customs, manners, and rarities, natural 
and artificial, which they shall find worth observing in the countries 
through which they pass. They shall be chosen out of two different 
Colleges : they shall begin with King's and Trinity, each of which shall 
present two young Qentlemen to the Congregation, which shall choose 
one out of each of the two Coll^^es. The rest of the Colleges shall 
take it by turns to present in the same manner in the order as they do 
for the choice of Proctors, as often as there shall be occasion to supply 
the place of them, or either of them, by reason of death or return into 
their own country: And my Will is, that these Pensions shall be 
continued but for the space of three years. The Master in every 
College shall present, and at the presentation of them shall be obUged 
to take the following Oath, which shall be read to him by the Senior 
Proctor in the Regent-House, before the University, at a Congr^ation : 

Dabisjidem Almas Matri Academiae^ quod tu probe noveris rdigionem^ 
moreSf et doctrinam juvenumy qttos modo prcieserUasHj et eos tane 
dignos existimas, guos foras emittat Alma Mater; Sic te Deus 
adjuvet. 

The residue and overplus of what I have given to the said four 
Doctors and Sir John Ellis, after these things are performed and all 
reasonable expenses have been allowed for the management of all 
matters relating to this my Will, I desire may be applied to the use of 
the University Library. 

And my further Will and desire is, that when any two or more of 
the Trustees shall be dead, then the surviving Trustees shall assign 



Benefaction of Dr Robert Smith 93 

and convey all the said Lands and Moneys remaining in them by virtue JjJ^ *5j^ 
of this my Will to some person or persons, and their heirs, to the use ih^ 
of them the surviving Trustees and of some other fit persons such as suooenon. 
they shall choose or name to be Trustees with them to make up the 
number of five, and of their heirs for ever, upon trust for the further 
performance of this my last Will and Testament. And then my Will 
is, that the old and new Trustees, and the survivors of them, shall to 
all intents and purposes have the same power and authority and be in 
the place of my said Trustees, Dr. Roderick, Dr. Bentley, Dr. James, 
Dr. Covell, and Sir John Ellis, as if they were all living: and that 
from time to time, as often as there shall be occasion, the surviving 
Trustees, two or more of their number being dead, shall take the like 
course as aforesaid to make up the said number with other fit persons, 
who shall successively for ever have the same power and authority to 
perform this my Will. 

Lastly, I give all the Money in the purses for the poor to make up ^^^ '<>' 
what is lost from St. Mary's Parish in my Grandfather Daye's gift. 

All the rest and residue of my Goods, Chattels, and personal 
Estate whatsoever herein before not disposed of, my debts, legacies, 
and funeral charges being first paid, I give and bequeath to my said 5"*^ ♦? 
Aunt Anne Daye, to her own proper use ; and I make her the full and executrix 
sole Executrix of this my last Will and Testament ; hereby revoking proper usa 
all former Wills and Testaments by me at any time heretofore made, 
publishing and declaring this to be my last Will and Testament. 

In witness whereof I have to this my Will, consisting of five sheets 
of paper, set my hand to every sheet, and my hand and seal to the last 
sheet thereof, the one and twentieth day of June, in the eighth year of 
the reign of our Sovereign Lady Anne, by the Grace of God of Great 
Britain, France, and Ireland Queen, Defender of the Faith, &c., and in 
the year of our Lord God 1709. 

WILLIAM WORTS 1. 



4. Benefaction of Robert Smith, 
1768. 

a. Salary of Plumian Professor. 

6. Mathematical Prizes. 

Robert Smith was admitted pensioner at Trinity College 
28 May, 1708. He graduated B.A. 1711, M.A. 1715, LL.D. 
1723, and D.D. (per literas regias) 1739. He was elected 

^ From an ofBioecopy of the Will in the Begistiy of the Uniyersity 
(Vol. xlii. 1. 1). 



94 Dr Smith's MathenujUiccU Prizes 

Fellow 1714, and in 1716 (16 July) Plumian Professor in 
succession to Cotes. He succeeded Bentley as Master 20 July, 
1742. He died 2 February, 1768. 

By Will dated 6 May, 1766, proved 19 April, 1768 (see 
below) he left £3600 to the University, the interest of which 
is to augment the salary of the Plumian Professor, and to 
found two Prizes for the best mathematicians among the 
" Junior Batchelors of Arts," that is, those who have become 
Bachelors designate in Arts by the Mathematical Tripos. 

By deed dated 2 November, 1867, the funds bequeathed 
by Dr Smith were conveyed to the University by the 
Rev. James Challis, Plumian Professor, the sole surviving 
Trustee^; an arrangement which the Senate had approved 
by Grace 31 October, 1867, in virtue of which the deed was 
directed to be sealed. 

In 1878 (29 March) a Syndicate appointed " to consider 
the Higher Mathematical Studies and Examinations of the 
University" recommended, among other things, 

that the Prizes founded by Dr Smith, instead of being awarded as 
now by the result of a special Examination, be given for the best two 
Essays on a subject or subjects in Pure Mathematics or Mathematical 
Physics, the candidates being Bachelors of Arts of not more than one 
yearns standing, and that with this view, steps be taken to obtain the 
necessary alterations in the terms of the Trust 2. 

This change was accepted by the Senate (the numbers 
being 40 Placet, 34 Non-placet); but no change was made 
till the Statutes of 1882 gave to the University the requisite 
power'. In 1883 the Special Board of Mathematics proposed 
the scheme now in force*. 



1 A trae copy of this deed is in the Registry of the Uniyersity, Prixes, 
eto. 56. 6. 

» Cambridge University Eeporter, 1878, pp. 422—428. 

> Statute B, ohap. zvi. 

* Ordinances^ ed. 1901, p. 579. 



Dr Smith's WUl 95 



Extract from the Will of Robert Smith, 
dated 6 May, 1766. 

I give to the University of Cambridge, Three thousand, five hundred ^^^f^^ 
pounds stock being part of iny Capital stock in the Old South Sea univenitj. 
annuities and I impower either of my executors to transfer it as soon 
as conveniently practicable to the Chancellor or Vice Chancellor, the 
Master of Trinity College, The Lucasian, the Plumian, and the Lown- Trustees 
dean Professors all of that University for the time being and to their 
successors in the same offices and I constitute and appoint them 
perpetual Trustees to receive and annually to distribute the interest of 
the said Stock in the following manner. 

First, I desire them to accept of a handsome dinner once a year as ^J^^^ 
a small acknowledgment for their trouble in discharging this Trust the 
ezpence of which and all other necessary expences being deducted from 
the annual interest of the stock. 

I give annually half the remainder upon a condition hereafter pjJj^uSf 
named to the Plumian Professor as an addition to the small revenue Professor, 
of that professorship, which I have had the honour to hold for many 
years. 

And the other half of that remainder I give in equal portions as A5'*'**L 
premiums to two Junior Batchelors of Arts of the said University, twoB.A.8. 
which, after all the candidates of that year for those premiums have 
been examined by the Trustees, shall appear to them the best proficients 
in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy, and ceteris paribus I give the 
preference to the candidates of Trinity College. Every year while the 
Questionists are sitting for a Batchelors degree, I desire a printed 
advertisement may be fixed at the gate of every Collie specifying the 
value of the premiums and the time and place of examination of the 
candidates. And, as soon as the examination is ended I would have 
the premiums paid to the two best proficients in Mathematics and 
Natural Philosophy they giving their receipts in a Book of Accounts of 
the receipts and payments of the interest of the said Stock; after 
which, but not sooner, the Plumian Professor shall be intitled to the 
other half of that years interest. 

If at any time the trustees shall think it advantageous to this Tmsteea 
Benefaction to sell out the said stock and with the price of it to £*J^y*^ 
purchase a freehold £state or Estates in Land I impower them to do 
so, and to apply the rents of it annually to the piurpoees above 
mentioned ^ 

1 From an offioe copy of Dr Smith's Will in the Begistiy of the 
University Prius, etc. 66, 1. 



96 Sir W. Bronme's Scholarship and Medals 



6. Benefaction of Sir William Browne, 
1774. 

a. A Classical Scholarship. 

6. Medals for Oreek and Latin Composition. 

William Browne was bom in the county of Durham 
3 January, 1692K His father was a Physician. He matri- 
culated at Peterhouse as a pensioner 6 July, 1707, proceeded 
B.A. 1710—11, M.A. 1714, M.D. 1721. In 1726 he became 
a Fellow of the College of Physicians, and in 1765 and 1766 
was President. He was knighted in 1748. He died 10 March, 
17741. 

By his Will (A) dated 11 February, 1772, he charged his 
estates with a perpetual rent charge of £21 a year to found 
a classical scholarship tenable for seven years, the candidates 
to present themselves for examination within one year from 
their matriculation, and, if successful, to remove to Peter- 
house; with the cost of two gold medals, each of five guineas 
in value, for the best Greek Ode and the best Latin Ode 
written by undergraduates ; and, by a codicil, with the cost 
of a third medal of the same value to be given in each year 
to the undergraduate who writes the best Greek and the 
best Latin Epigram. 

The Scholarship. 

The founder having left no precise directions for the 
choice of the scholar, the first nomination was granted by 
Grace (8 May, 1775) to his grandson. Sir Martin Folke (B). 
Li 1782, a second vacancy being imminent, a S3nidicate was 
appointed (10 April, 1782) to frame regulations for the 
choice of a scholar (C). The regulations which they drew 
^y --e dated 18 April, 1782 (D). 

A st*.*,^^ foj, ijjjg scholarship was framed by the Council 
of the Sen^^te 23 November, 1857, accepted by the Senate 
3 December, 1357^ ty the Commissioners 30 December, 1857, 

1 DieHonary 0/ Nau^^n^ Biography: Nichols' Lit. Anecd, ui. 816—30. 



\ 
\ 



for Oreek and Lolin Odes and Epigrams 97 

and approved by the Queen in Council 6 April, 1858 K 
This statute abolishes the admission and residence at Peter- 
house, with some other regulations imposed by the Will, and 
empowers the University to frame regulations from time to 
time. 

The Medals. 

These Medals were adjudged first in July 1776. The 
successful exercises, as directed by the Will, were written 
out, usually by the authors themselves, in a folio volume. 
Three of these, containing the successful exercises from 
1775 to 1829, are preserved in the Registry. 

A statute was framed by the Council of the Senate 
4 December, 1867, accepted by the Senate 10 December, by 
the Commissioners 30 December, and approved by the Queen 
in Council 6 April, 1858*. 

As this statute authorized a division of the prize into 
two Medals of half the original value, should the best Greek 
and the best Ijatin Epigram be not written by the same 
person, the Earl of Powis', soon after he became High 
Steward, conveyed to the University £200, in order that 
each medal might be of the uniform value of five guineas (E). 
This gift was accepted by Grace, 1 November, and thanks 
given to the donor 15 November, 1866. 



1 Statutei of the University, ed. 1896, p. 102. 

* n>id. p. 104. The Cotmoil had issned a draft statute 23 November 
1857, in whioh it was proposed that " the Medal shaU be given alternately, 
in one year for the best Greek epigram and in the next year for the best 
Latin epigram." This clause excited considerable opposition when the 
Statute was discnssed in the Arts School, 80 November, especially from 
Professor Selwyn, who made a brilliant speech in favour of the old arrange- 
ment. This was subsequently printed in an 8vo. pamphlet called The Battle 
of the Epigramt. The Council immediately proposed a new statute. 

s Edw. Ja. Herbert, third Earl of Powis, High Steward 1863—91. 



98 



Will of Sir William Browne 



TheWilL 
Preamble. 



Hie body to 

bebaried 

priTfttely. 



Hie pocket 

Honoetobe 

bariedwith 



A monu- 
ment to be 
set op to 
hlmlnWest- 
mlneter 
Abbey near 
that of 
Br Mead. 



A. Will of Sir William Browne, Knight, M.D,, dated 
11 February, 1772; and a Codicil thereto, dated 21 Jviy, 
1773. The Will and GodicU were proved 12 April, 1774^ 

The last Will of Sir William Browne, Knight, M.D., of Queen Square, 
in the Parish of St. George the Martyr, Middlesex. 

My Soul, dimnae particulam aurae, under the deepest Sense of 
Duty and Gratitude for a plentiful Possession of the Blessings and 
merciful Preservation from the Accidents of this Life, I most devoutly 
i^sign into the Hand of Our Almighty and Almerciful Creator, most 
humbly hoping for a Future Life of Felicity and Immortality through 
the Merits and Mediation of Jesus Christ, his beloved Son, Our Gracious 
Saviour, under whose Banner Nil desperandum est Christo Dues et 
auspice Christo. EN TOYTQ NIKH. Whose Revelation however incom- 
prehensible, in its plan and Execution, is demonstrable, in its End 
and Intention, to make Men Virtuous and Happy : which must therefore 
necessarily build Christian Faith upon its onely Foundation Reason. 
Detestable are all Attempts to set These Two at Variance : on the One 
Side, by certain Minute Philosophers absurdly assuming the Name of 
Free-thinkers, and yet denying the Existence of Liberty itself, who set 
up Reason in Opposition to Faith : on the Other Side, by certain 
Enthusiastic Divines, as absurdly claiming the Character of Just- 
reasoners, and yet denying the Jurisdiction of Reason itself^ who set 
up Faith in Opposition to Reason. Both parties, how different soever 
in Principle and Design, concurring in Consequence and Effect, to sap 
the Foundation of Christianity ; to Cancel our Divine Magna Charta ; 
and to rob us of our Sheet- Anchor of Security, with regard to the Evils 
of this Life, and of Hope, with regard to the Injoyments of a Life 
Aetemal. 

My Body, Mors sola fatetur quanttUa sirU konunum corpuacvla^ on 
Signs of Putrefaction, I direct to be deposited in the Bosom of my 
Mother Earth, close by that of Dame Mary, my Wife for Forty Five 
years, in the most private manner, without Pall-Bearers, Escutcheons, 
or Equestrian Ornaments, or any Attendants, except my Men-Servants : 
that my Funeral may neither be an Object of Entertainment to Spec- 
tators and Strangers, by attracting their observation, nor of Concern to 
Friends and Relations, by requesting their Attendance. On my Coffin, 
when in the Grave, I desire may be deposited in its Leather Case or 
Coffin my Pocket-EIzivir- Horace comes viae vitaeque dtUcis et vtilis, 
worn out with, and by m& Having erected my own and Lady's 
Monuments in Hilliugton Chancel, I appoint a Marble Monument to 
be erected for me, in Westminster Abbey, (where I designed to have 
been interred if I had died first,) according to my Draught, Inscription, 
and Directions left for this purpose. I desire it may be placed as near 



Clasdccbl Scholarship at Pelerhouse 99 

that of my Master Doctor Mead mtdioorum faeiU principU^ as any 
vacant Arch may admit, otherwise in the Poets Corner over against 
that of Mr Prior. Monuments furnishing a memento vivere, as well as 
memento mori, deserve to be regarded, not as insignificant and lying 
Memorials of the Dead, but as beneficent and truth-telling Lectures to 
the Living: the most mendacious of them all being a Panegyric on 
Virtue, and Satire on Vice, and consequently perpetuating their proper 
Distinction. VirtiUem et vivos tpemit qui non habet umam. 

My Estate, with which Qod hath been pleased most bountifully to Dtspoad of 
bless me, far beyond my Wants and Expectations, even up to a Rental 
of Eleven Hundred pounds a year, et avitum apto cum larb fundum 
ET PROPRio MARTB PARTUM, I dispose of in manner foUowing. 

[The estate is bequeathed to his *' daughter Mary wife of William 
Folkes Esq." : her husband, and her son ; and to their descendants. 
Among the charges to be paid out of the estate is the following:] 

A perpetual Rent-charge of Twenty Guineas a year, which I devise A 
to be paid yearly from my Decease, dear of Taxes and Disbursements, at Peter- 
to the Chancellour, Masters, and Scholars of the University of 
Cambridge, and their Successors, In Trust for Founding a Classic 
Scholarship: by electing the Best Classic Scholar, who shall offer 
himself for Examination within a Year from his Matriculation, public 
Notice being given by the Vice-Chancellor a Month before such 
Election. I will that my Scholar, so to be elected, shall enjoy the 
Rent-charge, with Arrears which may happen by Vacancy, for Seven 
Years on these Conditions ; That he shall admit himself at Peterhouse, 
and reside there every intire term during his Under-Graduate-ship : 
That he shall behave well, studiously, and religiously, and give up to 
the Fellows Table every Sunday a Copy of Greek or Latin Verses: 
That he shall go to Lectures with the Mathematio Professor for Three 
years, being sensible from depending on my own sole strength how 
much Labor tmprobus may be saved by such Assistance ; That he shall 
regularly and reputably perform all his College and University Exercises, 
an Act, first, second, and third Opponenoiee, in the Sophs Schools, and 
take the Degrees of Batchelor and Master of Arts. 



And for want of such Issue \ quod avbrtat Dbus optimus Maxiuub, ^f jJjJ^'Sh 



hOOM. 



it is my most melancholy Will to devise all my said Manors, Messuages, whole 

[etc.] to the Chancellor, Masters, and Scholars of the University of to the Chan- 
Cambridge, and their Successors In Trust, for Foimding two Phjrsic of^uni- 
Fellowships : Homines ad Deos nulla re propius accedunt guam salutem cSunl^dce 
hominihus dando. The Candidates to be Batchelours of Arts between fS,2iS^^ 
four and seven years standing, and strictly examined in Physio, and ^J^hdpL*^ 



1 Sir W. Browne's only grandson, Martin Browne Folkes, married 
38 Deo. 1775, and had several ohildren. Lit. Anecd. iii. 380. 

7—2 



100 Sir W. Browne's Physic Fellowships 



Who are to 
beelectora. 



Ckmditions 
of tennra. 



HIiFellowB 
may not 
leave 
England. 



general Learning, by All the Electors, whom I appoint to be not 
Ministers of State, but the Vice Chancellor, Master of Peter-house, 
Begius Professor of Physic, Doctors of Physic resident in the University, 
the Praesident and three Senior Elects of the College of Physicians 
London, all for the time being : by the Majority of whose suffrages in 
Person, or in Writing, on a Day to be named, with public notice one 
Month before, by the Vice Chancellor, all Elections shall be made. 
The Vice Chancellor to decide, in case of equal Suffrages. I trust to 
the Conscience of each Elector, and adjure him most solemnly, that 
his Rule be, Detur digniori. My Fellows residing in Peterhouse for at 
least Three Months together in each of the first Five years shall iujoy 
their Fellowships Ten Years: and shall attend courses of Anatomy, 
Botany, Chemistry, and Materia Medica, and the Practice of Physic in 
St Thomas's, or St Bartholomew's Hospital at London for Two years : 
and shall regularly take the Degree of Doctor, by keeping two Acts and 
Opponencies, on forfeiture of their respective Fellowship for non-per- 
formance of any one of these Directions They shall not go out of the 
Kingdom: as I am certain that, by the infinitely superior Public Libraries, 
Regulations, Studies, and Disputations of our Two Universities, over 
all others, and the much more rational and simple Practice of Physic 
in England, than elsewhere, (and particularly better suited to an 
English Constitution, as each Nation has peculiar Diseases from its 
Climate and Customs,) far more excellent Scholars and Physicians 
must always be formed there, than any where else upon the Globe. 
Therefore I desire, that Mine may be called, kAt IEoxt|v, Non-travelling 
Physic Fellows. 

The Rents and Profits of my Estate shall be aequally divided 
between my Fellows, by half yearly Payments on the first Tuesdays 
of January and July in each year, so far as to Three hundred pounds 
a year to each. 

All Overplus beyond that shall be distributed by the Vioe- 
Chancellor, at every Commencement, in Gk)ld Medals of Five Guineas 
value (to be struck by a like Die to that hereinafter mentioned) to 
such Batchelors of Arts, and Undergraduates, who shall deliver to 
Him the best Performances in Verse and Prose, and in Greek, Latin, 
or English, on Subjects to be published by Him in January before. 
All which Performances shall be fairly written, dated, and subscribed 
by the Authors in a Book, to be laid upon the Raster's Table, at 
every Commencement, for public Inspection. The Annual Account of 
the Rents and Profits of my devised Estates, fairly entred in a Book, 
shall also be laid on the Register's Table, for the same piurpose. 

« « « « 

Medals to be I direct my Executors to procure a Die to be engraved, proper to 
Snek Ode strike Medals of Gold of Five Guineas Value. The Obverse to be an 
Mda lAtin inaii|;|^^Qn Qf ^y Marble Medallion Bust. The Motto, Esse et vidsbi. 



To be called 
Non-iiayel- 
Unff Phyiic 
Feuomk 



Eachtoto 
receive £300 
ajear. 

The reddae 
of my for- 
tune to be 
■pent in 
goldmedala 
worth £5. 6t. 
each, to be 
given to 
Bachelors 
of Arts and 
Under- 



nadi 
for I 



for perfonn* 
lin 



proeein 
Greek, 
Latin and 



GhreeJc and Latin Odes and Epigrams 101 

On the Ezeigue, in two lines, Qulielm us Browne, Eques, Nat. hi. 
NoN. Jan. a. i. mdczoii. On the Reverse, ApoUo radiated, seated on 
an advanced Throne, resting his Lyre on his left Knee with his left 
hand, and extending his right hand with a Laurel- wreath over the head 
of a Scholar with a gown and band, kneeling on the Steps, and 
piaesenting a Scroll in his right hand, and holding down his Square 
Cap with his left hand. The motto, Sunt sua praemia laudi. On 
the Exergue, in two lines, Electus Coll. Med. Lond. Praeses, A. S. 
MDOCLXZVi. With this-shaU be struck Two Gold Medals of Five 
Guineas Value, and sent to the Vice-chancellor of Cambridge annually 
in the beginning of January, to be given by Him at the following 
Commencement, to Two Under-graduates : one of whom shall deliver 
to Him, in June before, the best Greek Ode, in imitation of Sappho ; 
the other the beet Latin Ode in imitation of Horace, on a Subject to 
be appointed by Him, in January before. Which Odes shall be fairly 
written, dated, and subscribed by the Authors in a Book, to be laid on 
the Register's Table, for public Inspection, at the Commencement. 
And I chai^ my estates for the perpetual Performance of this Annual 

Bequest. 

* * * * 

The Codicil. 
...By Recommendation of Dr Cooked Vioechancellor of the Uni- Medrifora 

dmAk And 

versity of Cambridge, I will that a Third Gold Medal, of like kind with Latin Epi- 
those Two in my Will mentioned, shall be sent by my Executor ''*™* 
annually, with those Two, to the Vice-chancellor of that University for 
the time being ; to be given by him, to the imdergraduate who shall 
produce the best Greek Epigramm, afber the Model of Anthologia, and 
the best Latin Epigramm, after the Model of Martial, on a Subject of 
his appointing ; to be given, aU Three, on the Commencement Day. 
I charge my Estates also with this third Medal for ever*. 



B. Grace for the appointment of the first Scholar. 
8 May, 1775. 

Cum Gulielmus Browne Eques imum aliquem Academiae Scholarem 
a Vobis eligendum exhibitione liberali sustentari curaverit, neque 
oertum eligendi methodum prsefiniverit : Placeat Vobis, ut Scholaris 
istius prim& vice nominatio ad Dominum Martinum Folkes Baronettum, 
Fundatoris ex fili& nepotem et hasredem, honoris caus& deferatur'. 

I WUliam Cooke, D.D., Provost of King's College, Vioe-Chanoellor 
1772—73. 

' Collated with the original in the Registiy of Wills, Somerset House, 



> Grace Book A, p. 24. 



102 



RvHes for the Browne Scholar 



C. Appoiwtmient of a SyndiccAe to decide ike number of the 
Electors and the mode of electing the Scholar. 10 April, 
1782. 

Cum praeclarus Vir Gulielmus Browne, Eques Auratus, vita functus, 
UDum Scholarem Graecis Latinisque Literis optime instructum, aique 
a vobis eligendum liberal! Stipendio auxerit, neque tamen aut Elect- 
orum Numerum praefinire aut ullum quidem eligendi Modum statuere 
curaverit; Plaoeat Vobia ut Dominus Pro-Cancellarius, Dr. Cooke, 
Dr. Colman, Mr. Borlase, Mr. Kipling, Mr. Seale, et Mr. Porter sint 
Syndici vestri, quibus Poteetas sit Electores in hac Parte designare, et 
Regulas insuper ad quas fiiturae omnes cum Examinationes tum 
Electiones exigantur, praescribere ; ita ut quicquid ab iis vel majori 
eorum Parte conclusum fiierit, id a Vobis ratum firmumque habeatur^ 



Wlio»reto 
beelacton. 



Whftithe 

yioe-ohan> 

oolloriBto 

do when the 

Hcholarahip 

toTacant 



Candidates 
toTlsit 
each elector, 
and write 
a Latin 
letter. 



D. RtUes for the choice of a Scholar on the Foundation 
of Sir William Browne, Knight, agreed upon by the 
Syndics appointed for that Purpose in the above-redted 
Orace. 

1. The Vioechancellor, or bis Deputy, the King's Professors of 
Divinity, Law, Physic, Hebrew, and Greek, and the Public Orator of 
the University, all for the Time being, shall be the Electors into the 
said Scholarship. 

2. The Yicechancellor, or his Deputy, within ten Days after 
receiving Notice of any Vacancy of the said Scholarship, shall summon 
the Electors then resident in the University to such Place as he shall 
think proper ; and if the Majority of the said Electors, so met together, 
shall then declare, by any Writing under their Hands, that the 
Scholarship is vacant, the Vicecbanoellor shall, within five Days 
afterwards, cause the said Declaration to be affixed on the Door of the 
Schools, or other Public Place belonging to the said University ; and 
no Election shall be proceeded upon till twenty-eight Days are fully 
compleat and ended after of the affixing the said Declaration : provided 
only that if the said Scholarship shall become void during the long 
Vacation, no public Declaration of such Vacancy shall be affixed upon 
the Door of the Schools, or elsewhere, till the 10th Day of October 
following, nor any Election be proceeded upon till the Expiration of 
twenty-eight Days from the said 10th of October. 

3. Every Person, who intends being a Candidate for the said 
Scholarship, shall within fourteen Days after the affixing of the said 
Declaration, visit each of the Electors then resident in the University, 
and give Notice by a Latin Epistle to such Elector, that he is a 

1 Grace Book A, p. 119. 



Rides for the Brovme Scholar 103 

Candidate ; and in Case he n^lects visiting within the Time, and in 
the Manner aforesaid, he shall be incapable of being elected into that 
Vacancy. 

4. By the Will of the Founder "any Pers<m shall he capable of JJjJgJgJ^ 
being elected who shall offer himself for Examination vnthin a Fear 
from his Matriculation ; " that is, any Person shall be capable of being 
elected, who offers himself for Examination at any Time from the Day 
of his Admission into any College in either University till the Expira- 
tion of one whole Year from the first public Matriculation that shall 
be held after his first coming to reside in such College. And Evidence 
of his being matriculated, as likewise a Certificate of the times of his 
Admission, and first coming to reside, under the Hand and Seal of the 
Master, or Locumtenens of his College, shall be brought by each 
Candidate to the Vicechancellor, or his Deputy, together with the 
Latin Epistle mentioned in the preceding Rule. 

6. The Examination shall be confined to the Greek and Latin SubjaokiL 
Languages, Composition, ancient History and ancient Geography. 

6. Within five Days after the Expiration of the twenty-eight Days Jh^i^t to 
limited as above for the public Notice of the Vacancy the Vicechancellor be elected, 
shall again sunmion the Electors then present in the University, and 
together with them shall fix upon the Time and Place for making the 
Election; at which Time, the Person who shall be chosen by the 
Majority of the Electors then present shall be deemed effectually 
chosen; provided always, that at every Election there be present at 

least four of the Electors ; and that at every Meeting of the Electors, 
whether for the Purpose of declaring a Vacancy, of fixing the Time of 
Election, or of electing a Scholar, in case of an EquaUty of Voices, the 
Vicechancellor, or his Deputy, shall have the casting Vote. 

7. By the Will of the Founder "the Scholar so dected, if he is not Seholw to 
already a member of Peterhouse, is to admit himself immediately into PeterhouMi 
that College^ and to enjoy the Benefits of his Scholarship^ with Arrears 

from the Vacancy^ for seven Years from the Lay of his Election ; on 
Condition, that he reside there every intire Term during his Under- 
graduateship ; that he behave himsdf toell, studiously, and religiously , 
and give up to the FeUowd Table evet^ Sunday a Copy of Oreek or 
Latin Verses; that he go to Lectures with the Mathematical Professor 
for three Tears ; thcU he regularly and reputably perform all his College 
and University Exercises ; and take the Degrees of Bctchelor and Master 
of Arts,^ And proper Certificates of his having complied with the 
above Conditions shall be annuaUy brought to the Vicechancellor by 
such Scholar, before he shall be entitled to receive his Stipend ^ 

April 18, 1782. 

^ From a copy of the Bales printed on a broadsheet in the Begistiy of 
the University, Vol. xzxviii. 10. 



104 Oiji of Earl Powis 



E. Augmentation of the Medals by the 
Eabl of Powis. 

The Vioe-Chanoellor desires to inform the Senate that the Right 
Honourable the £arl of Powis, High Steward of the University, has 
signified his wish to increase the value of the Browne Medals now given 
as annual Prizes for the best Qreek and Latin Epigrams. 

Sir William Browne, by his Will, provided that one Gold Medal of 
five guineas value should be given annually for the best Greek and 
Latin Epigrams, considered together. 

By the Statute of 1858 it was directed that '* if in any year the best 
Greek Epigram and the best Latin Epigram shall not be produced by 
the same Candidate, two Medals shall be given in that year, each of 
the value of two guineas and a half, one to the Candidate who produces 
the best Greek Epigram, and the other to the Candidate who produces 
the best Latin Epigram." 

The High Steward proposes to increase the value of each of these 
Medals to five guineas; and offers to convey to the University so 
much Stock in the Public Funds as will produce a sufficient annual 
income for that purpose. 

His Lordship does not desire to have the designation of the Medals 
altered, nor in any other respect to interfere with them. 

Chribt'b College Lodge, 
24 October, 1866. 



6. Benefaction of John Norris, 
1770. 

a. Professorship of Divinity. 

b. English Essay. 

c. Sermon. 

d Gift of Books. 
John Norris, of Gonville and Gains College, A.B. 1761, 
by Will dated 26 June 1770 (A) bequeathed to the University 
an annuity of £120 for the purposes fully set forth and 
explained in a very curious document (B) drawn up in his 
own handwriting, and referred to in the Will. A copy of 
this book was directed by the Senate to be sealed, 9 February, 
1780, a decision which implies acceptance of the bequest. 



BenefcLction of John Norris 106 

Mr Norris died 6 January, 1777, and in the following 
year litigation ensued between his heirs and the University^; 
but a decree of the Court of Chancery 3 November, 1781, 
ordered that the prescribed annuity should be paid to the 
Professor". The first Professor was elected 1 May, 1780. 

The Rev. Benedict Chapman, D.D., Master of Qonville 
and Caius College, by Will dated 8 October, 1846, bequeathed 
£500 to augment the Professor's salary; and, by a codicil 
dated 16 August, 1852, a second £500 to the same trust (C). 

In 1860-51 Geo. Elwes Corrie, B.D., Master of Jesus 
College and Norrisian Professor, being also Vice-Chancellor, 
was unable to lecture. Hia salary therefore reverted to Lord 
Wodehouse, as owner of the estate. Lord Wodehouse, 
however, offered the sum to the University in augmentation 
of Dr Chapman's bene&ction; and in 1863 (13 April) a 
Grace passed the Senate to accept the same and to thank 
Lord Wodehouse (D)*. 

In 1860 a new statute for the Professorship was con- 
firmed by the Queen in Council, together with a statute 
appropriating part of the revenue of the Lady Margaret's 
Professorship to the Norrisian endowment*. The idea of 
this increase originated with Wm. Selwyn, B.D., who shortly 
after his election in 1855 as Lady Margaret's Professor, 
offered to pay £700 a year to augment the Norrisian 
Professor's stipend ; an offer which was accepted by Grace, 
14 May, 1856. 

In 1867 the Council of the Senate proposed a new 
statute for the Prize for an Essay, which was confirmed by 
the Queen in Council 6 April, 1858*; and in 1864 
(18 November) new regulations, which were accepted by 
the Senate 8 December, 1864'. 

^ A Syndicate was appointed 10 April, 1778, to consider what ought to 
he done; and their report in favoar of defending the action was accepted 
by Grace, in May, 1778. 

> This decree is printed in KndowmenU, ed. 1876, pp. 74^82. 

* See the correspondence between Dr Okes, Vice-Chancellor, and Lord 
Wodehouse, Begistiy, Vol. xxxix. 19. 14. 

« 8tatuie$, ed. 1882, pp. 8&— 92 ; ibid. ed. 1896, pp. 86—88. 

• Statutes, ed. 1896, p. 105. • Ordinaneet, ed. 1901, p. 581. 



106 Will of John Norris 



A. Extmct from the Will of John Norris of Witton, 
Norfolk, dated 26 June, 1770. 

I hereby bequeath all that my messuage and lands commonly called 
Bromholme Priory Farm, or the Abbey Farm, in Bactou, in the County 
of Norfolk, and all great tithes whatsoever... now or late in the occupa- 
tion of Richard Gaze at the yearly rent of £190 [to certain named 
Trustees] 

To the use and intent that the Chancellor Masters and Scholars of 
the University of Cambridge and their successors shall and may for 
ever receive an annuity of £120 which shall be from time to time 
paid after the Institution of the Professorship by me intended to be 
established and referred to in the Book covered with marble paper 
hereinafter mentioned shall take efiect^. 



B. A Copy of what is wi^itten in the Book covered with 
Marble Paper all of the Testator's own handwriting. 

It was a great pleasure to me to find (in one of the Reviews) the 
following Extract from Dr Porteus's Sermon in 1767, preached at 
Cambridge : 

*'If there be any defect in the Plan of Education adopted in this place, 
it is perhaps in this— that Revealed Religion has not yet a proper Rank 
assigned it here amongst the other initiatory Sciences, is not made an in- 
dispensable qualification for academical honours and rewards, has not, in 
short, all that regard paid to it which its own intrinsic worth, and the 
peculiar circumstances at present attending it, may seem to demand." 

These sentiments corresponded with mine, formed many months 
earlier than the date of my first seeing this Extract. And I hope it 
will please the Lord Jesus Christ to prosper an Institution designed to 
promote His pure and holy Religion, and to accept my praise and 
adoration for the bias on my mind to the formation of such a design, 
and bestowing on me the pecuniary means of accomplishing it. 
Annuity of It is my fixed purpose to secure by Will an Annuity of One hundred 

*^^" and twenty pounds unto the University of Cambridge, out of my Estate 

or Farm, called the Abbey Farm or Bromholme Priory, tenanted by 
Richard Gaze, situated in the Parish of Bacton and adjacent parishes, 
and let under a lease granted by the late Mr Branthwait or his 
Executors, at a rent of £190, to secure the said annuity of £120, (but 
always subject to, and dependent upon, the accomplishment of the 
conditions hereinafter explained) as a perpetuity. The names of the 

^ Printed from a copy in tlie Registry of the University, Vol. xxxix. 19. 2. 



Employment of the Annuity 107 

persons unto whom I shall give by Will the said Farm of £190 a year, Trustees, 
in trust for the payment of the above Annuity of £120 will be inserted 
in such Will ; and the persons whom I would conjoin with them for the 
better carrying the plan into execution, and who may be called the 
Stewards of the Institution, as the others are the Trustees, are stewards. 

The Master of Trinity College, | from time 

The Provost of King's College, \ to 

The Master or President of Caius College, ) tima 
Be it also always imderstood, and ever kept in view, that the owner l^serjmtioii 
of this Estate, whoever he or she may be, shaU have perfect lilierty to the owner of 
lodge an Appeal in some of our Law Courts, setting forth or complaining 
that the terms or conditions made necessary by the Institutor of this 
Annuity or Grant, to the obtaining of the whole or parcels of the said 
Annuity or Grant, are not properly observed and fulfilled, and praying 
that the sum or sums, the conditions of which are or have been thus 
infracted, may no longer issue from such Estate : And my express 
meaning is — that the truth of such Appeal shall be judicially tried ; 
and that in case of a verdict, judgment, or decree, in favour of the 
Appellant, the said Annuity, or such parcels thereof, the conditions of 
which are or have been thus infracted or neglected, and so adjudged, 
shall thenceforward cease for ever. And that my words may be inter- ^*^?*V 
preted in the sense in which I employ them, I shall be a little more to be c 



explicit here, and shaU divide the annuity or grant into four parts 
The first comprehends the Professor's salary, £105: The second, the 
Academical honour or reward of £12 : The third has only the small 
sum of 2 Guineas, for an Annual Sermon : And the last a still smaller, 
18«. for Books: 



ployed. 



£105 





12 





2 


2 




18 


£120 






Now my express meaning is, if the conditions respecting the first Conse- 
be judicially determined to have been violated, that such first shall not non°pS- 
only henceforward for ever cease, but that the salary for the three oTany'? 
remainder shall cease for ever with it : that is, the whole Annuity SrocUonsL 
become void, and be as if it had never taken place : but if the conditions 
of one or all of the three last be only adjudged to have been not duly 
performed, that then the first shall continue in unabridged force, and 
that one, or more than one^ so violated, shall only cease and become for 
ever void. And the better to support this Institution (for as on the 
one hand, I would cautiously fence this Institution against frauds, so 
on the other I would not with less zeal uphold what it is so much my 
wish to establish, I would not with less wariness secure the Institution 
against the sordidness or troublesomeness of an Appellant,) I ordain 



108 Professorship of Revealed Religion 

and appoint that no prosecution shall be commenced by the owner of 
this Estate, without a previous notice of four calendar months, and 
without such notice expressing fully the parts of the Institution that 
seem to be violated : And my express meaning is, that if two of the 
three former mentioned Stewards shall within the four months return 
for answer under their hand, that such neglects or mistakes shall 
forthwith be rectified, and they be accordingly rectified, that then 
such Appeal shall not be made, but all litigation terminate. But for a 
second ofience (if due notice of an intentional Appeal has been once 
given,) no notice from the same owner shall be necessary. I should 
suppose it to be obvious, but lest it should not be, I desire to observe — 
that where a penalty is annexed to a transgression or neglect, the legal 
conviction of such transgression or neglect shall not cancel the Insti- 
tution in any part of it, but only create an obnoxiousness to the 
penalty. 



ProfeMor- 
■hipof 
Revealed 
BeligUm. 



Mode of 
election. 



Head! of 
Colleges to 



Aiecond 
Tote allowed 
in certain 
caaeetothe 
Matter of 
Trinity 
CoUegeL 



[a. The Professorship,] 

The first and principal part of the Institution is the Establishment 
of a Professorship of Revealed Religion, the Professor to be styled 
Revelation Professor ; or, as that phrase seems to me to be very 
objectible, the Norrisian Professor^ ; who shall be subject to each and 
all of the subsequent conditions and covenants. The Candidate or 
Candidates shall notice to the three former mentioned Stewards, under 
hand within the first 14 days of November, the design of supplying 
this Professorship; and the said three Gentlemen or Stewards shall 
select two out of the whole number of Candidates, and shall signify 
their names, on or before the first day of February then next ensuing, 
to the respective Masters, Heads, or Presidents of all the respective 
Colleges and Halls in this University of Cambridge ; and the day of 
election, or final appointment of one person to the trust, shall be within 
the first 14 days of the succeeding May : and the Election or appoint- 
ment shall be wholly vested in the suffrages personally given, of all the 
aforesaid Masters, Heads or Presidents ; and the majority of votes shall 
decide the Election ; not less than ten votes shall constitute this mode 
of Election. And upon the supposition that there is no agreement as 
to the selection of two Candidates, but warm disputation, such selection 
shall be referred to a majority of all the Heads, Masters or Presidents, 
due regard to be ever paid to the virtuous conversation and abilities of 
each Candidate; as to the latter, an examination, if required, to be 
passed by each Candidate before the Stewards, or their Deputy, both 
antecedently to the nomination, and to the Election. To bestow on 
the Master of Trinity an additional influence, he shall, if he pleases, 
defer his vote to the last, and if the numbers are even with his vote, 
his vote shall carry the Election, as if he had two votes, and could use 

^ Either appellation agreeable to me. 



Professorship of Revealed Religion 109 

them both in favour of one person. If required by two of the three 
Stewards, any Candidate shall take and subscribe to the Oath hereafter 
drawn up, on or before the twentieth of January : but I make it an 
indispensable condition, and no matter of option, that the Candidate or ^^^^'llJ^^li^ 



Candidates shall (each) take and subscribe to the oath afore mentioned the praKrib- 
in the presence of at least ten of the Heads, Masters, or Presidents in 
the morning of the Election : the words and all the words of such Oath 
shall be spoken articulately and audibly, then signed and then attested 
by each of the aforesaid ten Heads, Masters or Presidents. If such 
Oath be not thus formally taken, subscribed, attested, the Election 
shall not take place, at least shall be void, shall not entitle the person 
elected to a farthing of the salary. 

The Professor shall give or read, and not out of Term time, nor Fifty leo- 

blUr08 IQ Midi 

oftener than thrice in one week, fifty Lectures, on fixed days, and at term. 

fixed hours, so that the omission of a Lecture in one part of the day 

shall not be atoned for by a Lecture in another part of the same day, 

nor the omission of a Lecture on one day of the week be atoned for by ^^ '<v 

a Lecture on some other day of the same week; but these omissions 

shall be atoned for at the end of the whole Course of Lectures, and 

the Lectures be then also subject to the above regulation of being 

delivered within Term time, and of not exceeding three in a week^ 

I make it essential, that to constitute a Lecture there shall be at least 

six pupils or auditors, and that there be not a less time than one full ^[^ ^JJ*^ 

hour employed in the discharge of each Lecture; for the omission of bepveeent 

every Lecture under 50 and above 45, there shall be a deduction of one 

pound from the said salary of £105 ; for the omission of eveiy Lecture Omtelon of 

above 40 and under 45, there shall be a deduction of two pounds ; if the cartSST 

Lectures be under 40 and above 35, the salary shall be diminished one ■■'■^• 

half (t.e. it shall be only £52. lOf. instead of £105) in every year which 

has this deficiency : if the Lectures amount not to 35, all salary for 

that year shall cease. The actual illness or real indisposition of the 

Professor, if it be certified under his hand, or the hand of some of the 

Medical Faculty attending him, unto two of the three Stewards, shall 

excuse or annul the deduction of one pound as above named and 

explained, and the deduction of two pounds as above named and 

explained, provided always that the Professor appoints a Deputy, and Appolnt- 

such Deputy be approved by two of the three Stewards, the Master of depntj. 

Trinity to be one of the two so consulted : and the appointment of such 

Deputy shall do more than make up for the omitted Lectures : under 

50 and above 40, it shall atone for the omission of all above 35 ; so that 

the salary shall not be diminished unto £52. 10«. as before named and 

explained ; thus the Deputy may read 15 Lectures, provided always 

that sickness is the Professor's true reason for appointing such Deputy : 

the Deputy to be subject to the same restrictions as the Professor, with 

regard to the time of reading his Lectures, and everything else relating 

to them. If the Professor voluntarily relinquishes his office in any 



110 Professorship of Revealed Religion 



Who may be 
Profenor. 



No foe from 
pnplla. 

Penaltlee 
for taking 
money. 



OnaUflca- 

ttonsof 

pupOa 



LeotiirMon 
the Greed. 



On the 
BlUe. 



part of the first year after election or re-election, he shall forfeit 
(although he may have gone through the whole Course of Lectures) the 
whole year's salary ; if in the second year, his salary shall from £106 
be reduced to eighty -four pounds ; if in the third year, his salaiy shall 
be reduced from £105 unto ninety-four pounds and ten shillings : 
equally subject too in both these cases to all the terms and covenants 
relating to this Trust or Institution. 

The Professor may have been educated at either of our English 
Universities ; may be Lay or Clerical, but he shall not be elected into 
the office under his 30th year, nor re-elected after his 60th. He shall 
be obnoxious to dispossession at any time by a majority of the Heads, 
Masters, or Presidents of the respective Colleges and Halls in this 
University of Cambridge : but then the objections or objection to him 
shall be testified under the hand of each of such majority. The Master 
of Trinity shall have the same privilege here, as given him at the 
Election. Of the pupils or auditors attending these Lectures, or any 
of them, no gratuity whatever shall be accepted by the Professor, or to 
his advantage in any respect. The receiving of any money, gratuity, or 
compliment, shall if proved upon oath before the Trustees, or two of 
the three Stewards, within four Kalendar months after the trespass, 
invalidate entirely the Professor's claim for that year for a whole year 
to any salary whatever, (unless in instances of ampler fortune than 
usual, and these instances or exceptions have been submitted to all the 
three Stewards, and have received the sanction of all three). The 
persons first admitted, received and numbered as pupils, shall be those 
intended for Orders : I say only first admitted, for I would not wish any 
exclusion. A second proof of corruption in office shall not only cancel, 
as the first, all claim to one year's salary, but shall vacate the 
Professorship, a new Election shall ensue, and the late Professor be 
ever afterwards ineUgibla No pupil or auditor shall be admitted into 
the Lecture Room unless he be provided with the Old and New 
Testament, and with Pearson on the Creed ; if any one, not thus 
provided, be admitted, the Professor shall forfeit to the owner of the 
heretofore mentioned estate, out of his salary, 21 shillings for every 
such person so received. 

I make it essential to this Institution, that the Professor reads, or 
causes to be read during the Course of Lectures, the following articles 
in the said Exposition of the Creed : viz. The whole article relating to 
our Blessed Saviour, banning with— "And in Jesus Christ his only 
Son, our Lord,"— and ending with — "The Quick and the Dead;" the 
article relating to the Holy Ghost,— "I believe in the Holy Ghost," and 
the article— "The Resurrection of the Body, and the Life everlasting." 
At other times, it is my express meaning that the Professor shall make 
the Bible, particularly the Prophecies and the EvangeUcal History, the 
chief source and subject of his Lectures ; and that he points out and 
enlarges upon the various beauties of the sacred composition, (for 



Professorship of Revealed Religion 111 

infinite beauties there are,) paralleling them with admired passages in 
profane authors : that he shews the necessity of Revelation, and yet at 
the same time that it enjoins no practice, lays no restraint that is not 
entirely consonant with right reason. 

No Professor shall be allowed to continue in his oflSce, without a J^^jgL*® 
fresh Election, for more than five successive years. The Oath herein- for 6 jmn. 
after inserted shall be as necessary to the validity of a re-election as of 
the first Election. The Stewards are to have power to reject any 
Lecture Boom which they shall judge incommodious. The time which 
I appoint for the payment of the salary is the 24th day of every June 
(supposing the conditions necessary to claim it are fulfilled), that Jime 
excepted which shall succeed the May in which the first Election under 
this Institution shall take place. Before the owner of this Estate shall J^^j^ronf 
be compellable to pay the Annuity, a state of the account, that is, how of nJary. 
many omissions there have been in the number of Lectures, whether 
there has been a Deputy, in short, how far the conditions have been 
discharged, such a state of facts shall be delivered, if required, to the 
Trustees of this Annuity or the owner of the Estate, his or her Agent, 
under the hand of the Professor — in these words : I assert that the above 
account of my froceedings in my Professorship is most truly and fairly 
stated: but whether demanded or not, the Professor shall, before the 
20th of May in every year, send such a state of his proceedings, so 
worded and subscribed, to each of the three Stewards ; to one of whom, 
and not to the Professor himself, shall the Annuity be paid : and the 
receipt taken shall run in the names of all the three Stewards, shall be 
subscribed by all three (when it happens otherwise — from some necessity 
— the reason of the omission of such name shall be assigned), and shall 
close with these words: For the use of the Professor under this grant: 
of aU the conditions of which we are to the best of our ability faithful 
Quardians. 

As I prof ess to bdieve that the Godhead or the Divine and one only Oath to be 
independent Essence, comprehendeth three persons, the Father, and the caQdidiiI« 
Son, or ^^the Word, who was made Mesh, and dioelled amongst us," and fesMrahip. 
the Holy Ghost, or Holy Spirit — so I sivear that I will not knowingly 
and designedly, if I shall be elected into thai trust to which this Oath is 
made preparatory, either inculcate or countenance in my discharge of the 
said Trust any doctrines contrary to my present sense of the Profession 
which I have now thus pMicly made of my Religious Belief Amen. 
So hdp me God, 

As I prof ess to believe in one God the Father Almighty, and in one Aeeooud 
Lord Jesus Christ, the only-begotten Son of God, God of God, Light of o»th. 
Light, very God of very God, and in the Holy Ghost, the Lord and Giver 
of Life, proceeding from the Father and the Son, and together with them 
worshipped and glorified, so I swear that I vrill not knowingly and 
designedly, if I shaU be elected into that trust to which this Oath is made 
preparatory, either inculcate or countenance, in my discharge of the said 



112 The English Essay 

trtuij any doctrines contrary to the Profesnon which I have now thus 
publicly made of my belief in the ^^Boly, Blessed^ and Glorious Trinity^ 
three Persons and one Ood," Amen. So hdp ms God, 

[b. The English Essay,] 

SMEiuSSsh '^^ second part or parcel of the Annuity relates to a premium for 

K«fcy. the encouragement of application in the Students of this University 

of Cambridge. I allot Twelve Pounds out of the Annuity of £120, as 
a reward for the best Prose English Essay, on some such subjects as 
the following : The great advantages of Revelation — (shewing amongst 
other proofs, the insufficiency of human reason, by the preposterous 
opinions of those nations "who have not yet learned Christ") — The 
goodness of our Father to give his only-begotten Son for us — The 
necessity of a Redeemer, with the sufficiency of his merits, and the 
insufficiency of our own— His perfect example and amiable character — 
The astonishing and most gracious reward of Eternity— no reason to 
expect such a reward, if we contiuue in the practice of any one known 
sin, however scrupulously exact we have been in performing all our 
duties, any single one only excepted — The necessity of the co-operation 
of the Holy Spirit with our endeavours after righteousness, the pleasing 
contemplation of a continual Comforter — The literary beauties of the 
Scriptures, &c. &c. 
G^^ Two Three pound twelves, or £7. 4s, of the aforesaid sum of Twelve 

pounds, shall be expended upon a gold medal, one side of which shall 
represent the New Testament, and the Cross with this Inscription 
around it. The wisdom of God unto salvation; the reverse shall represent 
— in as few figures as possible, in order that they may be more distinct 
— the Resurrection, with this Inscription upon it Death is swaMowed up 
in victory ; upon the edge (where the milling in our current coin is 
impressed) shall be these words The Norrisian Prize\ and if there be 
room, the name of the successful candidate, and the date of the year. 
I would have the medal executed in a very masterly manner. 
How the And I leave the adjudication of superior merit in the Essays to the 

adjudged. Opinion of the three Stewards ; and if they are not agreed, to a majority, 
when the Professor under this Institution, and the Hebrew and Greek 
Professors, have been first called in. 
Books. The residue of the Twelve pounds, viz. Four pounds and sixteen 

shillings, is to be disposed of in books; amongst which I make it 
essential that there be the following : a Bible, or the Old and New 
Testament — Sherlock's (Bishop of London) Discourses, vol& 4 — Leland's 
View of Deistical Writers, last edition — Pearson on the Creed : — (but 
if the Bible and Pearson be already had, there is no occasion for 
duplicates). 

^ Or, The Revelation Prize, aooordingly as the Professor's appellation 
shall be settled. 



medal. 



The Annuel Sermon 113 

The surplus after this purchase shall be expended in such books as Employ- 
the Professor shall choose: upon the inside of the left-hand cover (as suzpliu. 
the book is opened) of each book shall be pasted a copper^plate 
impression of one of the sides of the medaL 

The qualifications of the Candidates, for the first three years after ^^'^^SJJgJ** 
the oominencement of this Institution, shall be only these : Their age ^^* 
not to exceed 30, nor to be under 20— to be, or to have been students 
of this University : after the first 3 years, there shall ever henceforward 
be essential this additional qualification, namely, attendance at these 
Lectures for 20 times in the course of one year ; and moreover, this 
attendance is to be signified to the Stewards under the Professor's hand. 

The Professor shall propound each year's Thesis, and he shall cause §^|f* ^ 
it to be published in one of the most public London papers, and such when to be 
publication shall be always within the first ten days of every November : •»**o«"<»^ 
the Essays to be sealed up as customarily in other probationary 
exercises, and sent to one of the three Stewards, on or before the tenth 
day preceding the Sunday in every Passion- week, and on the Thursday »nd when 
morning preceding every Good Friday shall the successful Candidate 
know the Adjudication, and shall within foiurteen days receive the 
medal and the books. Provided always, that at the time of receiving 
them he gives a promissory note for the payment of Twelve pounds to 
the Trustees, or owner of the Estate whence arises the Annuity, in 
case he does not cause such Essay so rewarded to be publicly printed ^Jp*7j? ^a 
and published within two calendar months. Any opinion advanced in pubUehed 
such Essay, contrary to the National Church's Articles, with respect to year under 
our Saviour's Divinity, and the personality of the Holy Spirit, shall as P*"*^*^- 
utterly disqualify a Candidate from receiving the reward, as the 
absurdity and weakness of the composition itself ; and whether such 
Essay does advance such opinion or opinions, is hereby left to the 
decision of them who are constituted Judges of the merit of the Essays. 
The payment of the aforesaid portion of Twelve pounds out of the 
Hundred and twenty pounds, is to be made at the same time with the 
payment to the Professor, and unto the same receivers, who are to give 
a distinct receipt for the same. The medal and books are annually to 
be ordered by the Stewards, and whatever expence may arise from the 
publication of the Thesis in the London paper, and from the copper- 
plate impressions, is to be defirayed out of the £4. 16<. allowed for 
books. 

[c. The Annual Sermon,'] 

The third division compriseth only the small sum of two guineas, ^^JJ^ . 
for an Annual Sermon in the University Church, (the subject to have Uniyenity 
always some reference to Revelation,) to be preached upon every Good 
Friday, unless it be a constant custom already to have a sermon in the 
morning of that day ; (for I would have this sermon preached in a 

C. 8 



114 Books to he given to prisoners 



Sormon to 
be printed 
and pub- 



morning;) and if such be the present custom, then this sermon shall 
be preached in the morning of one of these days, (whether it happen to 
be Sunday or not,) viz. the .14th of November, or the Ist of December, 
or the 10th of the same month, in every year : and a notice of seven 
days previously to the preaching of it shall be given in the Cambridge 
Newspaper, or that paper which circulates most generally in the 
University and Town : if the Professor under this Institution be in 
orders, he has his choice to preach it, and if not in orders, or chooses 
not to preach it, he shall have the appointment of the person. But be 
it always understood— That if the sermon be not publicly published in 
print, within four weeks from the day of preaching it, the money, viz. 
the two guineas, shall not be received by the Trustees or Owner of this 
Estate ; it shall for every such year so omitted not become due. The 
advertisement in the paper of such sermon to be so preached shall be 
paid by the Professor, who (if the sermon be published) may deduct it 
from the two guineas. The Stewards who give the other before- 
mentioned receipts are also to give a receipt for this money, observing 
in such receipt '*that the sermon has been printed and published,'' and 
when the other sums (if due) are to be paid into the hands of the 
already named Stewards, this sum (if due) is likewise to be paid. 



fateen 

be spent 
annually in 
bookBtobe 
given to 
prieonenln 



[d. Annual gift of hooks to prisoners in University Quol,'\ 

The fourth and last particidar includes only the sum of eighteen 
shillings (for add £105, and £12, and £2 and 2«. there will only want 
18«. to complete the annuity of One hundred and twenty pounds) ; and 
this sum of eighteen shillings is by my express order to be laid out in 
ajmoiVenity books — The New Testament^ and (a shilling book) the OrecU Importance of 
a Edtgious Life: which books are annually to be sent by the Professor 
imto one of the Proctors of the University, who is to distribute them 
amongst such delinquents (who can read) as shall happen from time to 
time to be confined or imprisoned in some gaol, spinning or workhouse, 
or cage, belonging to the said University of Cambridge. Before this 
sum of I8s. shall become due from the Trustees, or Owner of the 
Estate, whence the Annuity arises, an account under the Proctor's 
hand, That such hooks {to the amount aforesaid) have been distributed, 
shall be transmitted to one of the Stewards already named, who shall 
produce the same when the receipts for the other sums are delivered ; 
at which time this sum (if due) shall be likewise paid. 

If this Institution do not take place, from any non-conformity in 
the University, within twenty-four months from the day of my decease, 
it shall not afterwards : but the whole Annuity of £120 shall lapse, and 
be ever afterwards irrecoverable. 

All written with my own hand and bearing date, Bristol, September 
22nd, 1768. 
(Containing twenty pages.) John Norris. 



General direcUons by Mr Norris 116 

This is the Paper or Booh to which my WiU (bearing date, June 2Bth: 
1770) refers. 

Oh mj sister! (or whoever shall succeed me) should there be any 
legal defect in this Institution, avail not yoiu-self of it, but fulfil my 
meaning : depend upon it, you will never be happy (for who bestows 
happiness?) if you do not act in this instance agreeably to my 
intention. 

This is the Paper, or Book^to which my WHl (bearing date, June 2Qth, 
1770) refers. 

I remember that at the end of the extract from Porteus's sermon, 
(which extract I have cited) the Reviewers, those pious Annotators, 
make some such reflection as this: "We hope that if ever such an 
Institution does take place, it will be grounded upon a freedom of 
enquiry." What the end of this freedom of enquiry is, the Infidelity 
of the age loudly and clearly explains. A freedom of enquiry is indeed 
recommended to us, but it is an unprejudiced freedom of enquiry ; and 
in what heart — in this sera of intellectual pride — shall we find no 
previous bias? The folly and arrogance is, that the modem free- 
thinker imagines there can have been no freedom of enquiry where the 
result of it corresponds not with its own creed : as if the man whose 
enquiry led him to the same opinions with those of Burnet of the 
Charter-house, Pearson, Addison, Nelson, Sherlock, must be more 
narrowminded, more fettered than he who coincides with Clarke, 
Clogher, and the liberal translator of the New Testament, &c. &c. 
But why should I seem to wish to apologize for restrictions which 
I judge proper to be put upon an Institution that is wholly my own ? 
There can be but one system of Divinity, according to the truth; 
and this true system is T think contained in one of the petitions of the 
Church of England — "O holy, blessed and glorious Trinity, three 
persons and one Qod," &c. ; wherefore I very naturally established this 
Institution upon what I esteem to be the language of Scripture. It is 
easily discoverable, even by Harwood's liberal Translation of the New 
Testament (so liberal as to preserve no Original Text) what falsehoods 
a Libertine Lecturer might introduce, what a wrong bias upon young 
minds he might permanently impress. Certain it is, that every 
seriously thinking man would, upon estabUshing such an Institution 
as this, require of its Professor the sanction of an oath not to inculcate 
principles contrary to those entertained by the Institutor. Not that 
I desire, nay, it is of all things opposite to my desire, that controversial 
topics should be debated in these Lectures : The necessity of a 
Revelation, — The noble precepts of morahty, which it has conveyed to 
us, — The beauties of the Sacred Writings, — these are the things which 
I wish to be illustrated ; only as there must unavoidably be explana- 
tions of difficult passages, and seeming contrarieties, and as there will 
too be sometimes curious questions asked, I would warily guard against 

8—2 



116 Benefaction of Rev. B. Chapman 

notions derogatory from Him who made us, and from Him also, who 
if this Institution be a righteous one, has influenced me to establish it— 
notions derogatory from the Son, and the Holy Ghost, both of whom 
live and reign (in what manner 'tis most true we know not,) with the 
Father, as one Lord Qod, to an eternity of ages. Hallelujah ! 

One word more— I apprehend that none of our Universities, how- 
ever so disposed, coiUd permit the establishment of an Institution (of 
this nature) contrary to the Articles of the Protestant National Church. 
What objection then can Cambridge in propriety have to my prescribed 
Oath? The reason why I particularized the oath is obvious— That he 
who should take it might know its compass : for a general oath, such 
as would have enforced an unspecified conformity to the Articles of our 
Church, would have been, I think, abundantly too comprehensive. 
Infallibility belongs to no earthly communion ; there are some of the 
39 Articles (as much as I at this juncture recollect of them,) which, if 
true, would abate my love towards Him who I am now convinced is the 
only proper object of it. 

If this Institution takes place, I would wish that the three Stewards 
should be presented with Ten guineas each, and that the same smn 
should be given to each of the Trustees, over and above what may be 
left to them by my will. 

J. N.i 

0. Extract from Will and Codicil of Benedict Chapman, 
D.D,, dated respectively October 8, 1846, and August 16, 
1852. 

ThoWilL From a high sense of gratitude for the great advantages I have 

derived from having been educated at the University of Cambridge, 
I leave and bequeath unto the Chancellor Masters and Scholars 
of that University five hundred poimds 3 per Cent. Reduced Bank 
Annuities, the dividends of which I direct shall be paid imto the 
University Chest till the legacy duty shall have been repaid to the 
Chest, my object of which is that the foundation for which I give it 
may eventually have the full interest of my benefaction ; and after the 
Chest has been thus satisfied my Will is that the dividends as they 
become due should be paid to the Norrisian Professor of Divinity for 
the time being as an augmentation of his stipend under the same 
conditions as are prescribed in the original foundation. 

TheGodioiL And whereas I have by my said Will left and bequeathed five 
hundred poimds 3 per Cent. Reduced Bank Annuities to the Chancellor 
Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge for the augmen- 
tation of the salary of the Norrisian Professor of Divinity in that 
University ; now I hereby leave and bequeath unto them another five 

1 From a copy in (h^ Registry of the University, Vol. xxxix. 19* 1. 



Benefaction of John RtUse 117 

hundred pounds 3 per Cent. Reduced Bank Annuities in addition to 
my former bequest, and I hereby direct, as in the former case, that the 
legacy duty thereon may be repaid to the University Chest in the same 
manner as mentioned in my said Will, and that the Professor receive 
none of the dividends till the University Chest has been repaid what it 
has advanced, so that the Professor may eventually receive the full 
benefit of the interest of the whole l^acy of one thousand pounds 
3 per Cent Reduced ^ 



D. Benefaction of Lord Wodehouse. 

The following Grace passed the Senate 13 April, 1853 : 
Cum Professor Norrisianus Procanoellarius fuerit anno Academico 
185Q-1861 ideoque nequiverit Praelectiones solitas legere, et cum eft 
de causft stipendium in ilium annum (videlicet £102. 10. 6.) lapsum 
fuerit in manus Baronis Wodehouse penes quem sunt terrsB Norrisianee, 
et cum Baro Wodehouse dictam summam obtulerit Academias quo 
augeantur pecuniae nuper ^ Doctore Chapman in augmen stipendii 
Professoris Norrisiani legates 

Plaoeat Vobis ut donum illud a Vobis accipiatur, gratiaeque Aca- 
demisB Baroni Wodehouse a Procancellario rependantur. 



7. Benefaction of John Hui^e, 
1790. 

a. Christian Advocate. 

6. Preacher or Lecturer. 

c. Dissertation. 

d. Scholarships at S. John's College. 

John Hulse, of Elworth Hall, Cheshire, matriculated as 
a pensioner at S. John's College, 9 December, 1724. He 
became a Bachelor of Arts in 1728, but did not proceed to 
any of the higher degrees. He died 14 December, 1790, at 
the age of 82". 

> From a copy of the Will and Codicil sent by Dr Chapman's executor 
to the Vioe-Chanoellor, and preserved in the Registry of the University, 
Vol. xxzlz. 19. 13 (2). 

* See a life of Mr Hulse prefixed to Rationalism and Revelation (the 
Hnlsean Lectures for 1837) by Bi. Parkinson, B.D. Bvo. Lond. 1838. 



118 The Christian Advocate 

By his Will dated 21 July, 1777, — a curious and very 
lengthy document — he bequeaths the whole of his property, 
subject to certain life-interests, the nature and duration of 
which are enjoined with painful minuteness, to the University 
of Cambridge, in trust for the purposes described below. 
The " trustees for the disposal of all the bene&ctions to the 
University" are to be the Vice-Chancellor, the Master of ' 
Trinity College, and the Master of S. John's College. As 
the Will has already been printed in fulP, it will not be 
necessary to reprint more than those passages which describe 
the intentions of the testator with regard to the University. 

In the first place, certain rents are set apart 

The for and towards the maintenance and support of one such learned and 

Advocate. ingenious person of the degree of Master of Arts or of Bachelor or Doctor 
of Divinity, and of the age of thirty years or upwards, and then resident 
in the said University, as shall be by them [the trustees] or any two of 
them on Christmas-day, or within seven days after, thought the best 
qualified, and by them or any two of them successively elected for any 
term not exceeding five or six years, in order to prepare some proper and 
judicious answer or answers every year to all such new and popular or 
other cavils and objections against the Chnstian or Revealed Religion, 
or against the Religion of Nature, as may in the opinion of the said 
last-mentioned Trustees or any two of them seem best or most proper 
to deserve or require an answer, whether the same be ancient or 
modem objections, but chiefly such as are most modem, and especially 
such as have appeared in the English language of late years against 
Christianity, and which may not seem to have received a fiill and 
sufficient answer, if any such there shall be, unto the year preceding 
such election, as likewise to be ready to satisfy any real scruples or 
objections in a private way that may be brought from time to time by 
any fair and candid inquirer against the same, such writer to be called 
The Christian Advocate, and such his written answer to be in English, 
and only against notorious infidels, whether Atheists or Deists, not 
descending to any particular controversies or sects amongst Christians 
themselves, except some new and dangerous error either of superstition 
or enthusiasm, as of Popery or Methodism, either in opinion or practice 
shall prevail, in which case only it may be necessary for that time to 
write or to reason against the same, and such treatise or treatises to 
be every year printed,... but no person shall be ever re-elected or at any 
time after he has once filled the said office appointed thereto again*. 

1 Endouments, ed. 1876, pp. 262—310. 
» Ibid. p. 273. 



The Prectcher or Lecturer 119 

Secondly, he appoints a Pre€W5her, whose duties are thus 
described: 

And first it was always my humble and earnest desire and intention The 
that the following donation and devise should be founded as much as or 
possible on the plan of that profoundly learned and successful inquirer ^'**''"' 
into nature and most religious adorer of nature's God, I mean the 
truly great and good (as well as honorable) Robert Boyle, Esquire, who 
has added so much lustre and done equal service both by his learning 
and his life to his native country and to hiunan nature and to the 
cause of Christianity and truth, to the promoting in some degree a 
design so worthy of every reasonable creature. 

[Certain rents are to be paid] to such learned and ingenious clergy- 
man in the said University of the degree of Master of Arts, and under • 
the age of forty years as shall be duly chosen or elected on Christmas 
Day, or within seven days after, by the Vice-Chancellor there for the 
time being, and by the Master or Head of Trinity College and the 
Master of Saint John's College, or by any two of them, in order to 
preach twenty sermons in the whole year, that is to say, ten sermons 
in the following spring in Saint Mary's Great Church in Cambridge, 
namely, one sermon either on the Friday morning or else on Sunday 
afternoon in every week during the months of April and May and the 
two first weeks of June, and likewise ten sermons in the same church 
in the following Autumn, either on the Friday morning or else on 
Simday afternoon in every week diuing the months of September and 
October and during the two first weeks in November, the subject of 
which discourses shall be as follow«th, that is to say, the subject of five 
sermons in the Spring and likewise of five sermons in the Autumn 
shall be to shew the evidence for Revealed Religion, and to demonstrate 
in the most convincing and persuasive manner the Truth and Excellence 
of Christianity, so as to include not only the prophecies and miracles, 
general and particular, but also any other proper and useful arguments, 
whether the same be direct or collateral proofs of the Christian 
religion, which he may think fittest to discourse upon, either in general 
or particular, especially the collateral arguments, or else any particular 
article or branch thereof, and chiefly against notorious infidels, whether 
atheists or deists, not descending to any particular sects or controversies 
(so much to be lamented) amongst Christians themselves, except some 
new or dangerous error either of superstition or enthusiasm, as of 
Popery or Methodism or the like, either in opinion or practice shall 
prevail, in which case only it may be necessary for that time to write 
and preach against the same. Nevertheless the preacher of the ten 
sermons last mentioned to shew the Truth and Excellence of Revealed 
Religion and the Evidence of Christianity may at his own discretion 
preach either more or fewer than ten sermons on this great argument 
only, provided he shall in consequence thereof lessen or increase the 



120 Hvlsean Prize and Scholarships 



Sermoiiito 
be printed. 

The 

preacher 

not to be 

reelectedM 

»ffener»l 

nua 



TheDiawr- 

tationor 

PriM. 



Bcholar- 
■hipi. 



number of the other ten remaining sermons which are hereinafter 
directed to be on the more obscure parts of Holy Scripture in a due 
proportion, so as that he shall every year preach twenty sermons on 
these subjects in the whole. And as to the ten sermons that remain, 
of which five are to be preached in the Spring and five in the Autumn 
as before mentioned, the lecturer or preacher shall take for his subject 
some of the more difficult texts or obscure parts of the Holy Scriptures, 
such I mean as may appear to be more generally useful or necessary 
to be explained, and which may best admit of such a comment or 
explanation without presimiing to pry too far into the profound secrets 
or awful mysteries of the Ahnighty. And in all the said twenty 
sermons such practical observations shall be made and such useful 
conclusions added as may best instruct and edify mankind, the said 
twenty sermons to be every year printed and a new preacher to be 
every year elected (except in the case of the extraordinary merit of the 
preacher) when it may sometimes be thought proper to continue the 
same person for five, at the most for six years together, but no longer 
term, nor shall he ever afterwards be again elected to the same duty \ 

Thirdly, he appoints the following rules for a Dissertation 
or Prize. The prizeman is described as 

such other learned and ingenious person in the said University under 
the degree of Master of Arts, as shall compose for that year the best 
dissertation in the English language on the evidence in general or on 
the prophecies or miracles in particular, or any other particular 
argument, whether the same be direct or collateral proofs of the 
Christian Religion, in order to evince its truth and excellence, the 
subject of which dissertation shall be given out by the Vice-chancellor 
and the said two Masters my trustees above mentioned, or by some of 
them, on New Year's Day annually, and such dissertation as shall be 
by them or any two of them on Christmas Day annually the best 
approved, to be also printed and the expence defrayed out of the 
author's income under this my Will, and the remainder given to him 
on Saint John the Evangelist's Day following; and he who shall be 
so rewarded shall not be admitted at any future time as a candidate 
again in the same way, though he may be elected to the other offices 
afterwards, to the intent that others may be invited and encouraged to 
write on so sacred and sublime a subject'. 

Fourthly, he founds three scholarships in S. John's College, 
Cambridge. The scholars 

shall be undergraduates in Saint John's College aforesaid, and shall 
be bom in the County Palatine of Chester, such scholars to be elected 
by the Master and a majority of the Senior Fellows of the said College 

^ MndawmetUt, ut supra, p. 280. * Ibid. p. 281. 



Memorial to Eichard Porson 121 

on Christmas Day or in the first seven days after, and may be 
distinguished as usual by the name of Hulse's Scholai-s, and to wear 
a cloth gown with long and open sleeves hanging down like those of 
Bachelors^ 

In 1791 (10 May) a Syndicate w€U3 appointed to confer 
with Mr Hulse's executors, the Will being a document, €U3 
the preamble to the Grace sets forth, quod ad easitum com- 
mode perduci nequeat; and in November of the same year 
(Grace, 1 November) it was directed that probate of the 
Will should be obtained, the cost of doing so being charged 
to the Chest*. The first Christian Advocate was appointed 
in 1803, and the first lecturer in 1819. 

In 1830 (21 December) the Court of Chancery reduced 
the number of lectures to eight, and ordered that the time 
limited for printing the said lectures be enlarged to one 
year*. 

In 1860 the office of Christian Advocate was converted 
into a Professorship of Theology, the duties of the lecturer 
and the conditions of the Prize were modified*, and subse- 
quently, by Statute B, the management of the estates was 
vested in the Chancellor, Meusters, and Scholars of the 
University*. 



8. Portrait, Prize and Scholarship in memory 
OF Richard Porson. 

1816, 1848. 

In 1792, when the Fellowship at Trinity College held by 
Richard Porson expired, a subscription was set on foot with 
the view of purchasing an annuity for him. The sum collected 
is said to have amounted to nearly £2000. The annuity 
was not purchased, because Porson declined to accept the 
munificence of his friends, except on the condition that he 
should receive the interest only during his life, and that the 

* Endauments, ut supra, p. 274. " Grace Book A, pp. 257, 266. 

* The decree of the Court is printed in EndowmentM, ed. 1876, p. 810. 
« StatuUt, ed. 1896, pp. 88—90, 106. Ordinancei, 1901, p. 581. 

' Statutes, nt supra, p. 62. 



122 Memorial to RicTiard Porson 

principal should be returned to the subscribers at his death. 
The money was therefore vested in trustees for this purpose. 

After his death, 25 September, 1808, the subscribers 
decided that the money should not be returned to them, but 
that it should be applied to such purposes as the surviving 
trustees should choose. These purposes were: (1) Engraving 
the portrait of Person by Hoppner; (2) Foundation of the 
Person Prize; (3) a Monument in Trinity College Chapel; 
(4) other expenses not specified. 

The residue of the fund remained in the hands of Charles 
Bumey or of his son Charles Parr Bumey (who allowed 
interest on it at the rate of 5 per cent, per annum), with the 
view of its accumulating to a sum sufficient to endow a 
scholarship, until the death of the other trustee the Rev. 
John Cleaver Banks, when a deed (printed below. III) was 
drawn up conveying to the University the sum to which this 
residue had accumulated. A Grace authorising this deed 
to be sealed passed the Senate, 12 May, 1848. 

In 1858 new Statutes for both Prize and Scholarship 
were approved by the Queen in Council; and in 1892 
(8 December) the Senate approved a report of the Council 
of the Senate, dated 31 October, which proposed to limit the 
annual stipend of a Person scholar to £60, and to make 
application to the Court of Chancery "for power to apply 
the accumulations of the surplus income of the fund to the 
foundation of a second Person scholarship, so soon as the 
fund is so large as to produce an income of thirty pounds 
a year at least in addition to the income of the existing 
scholarship ^" 

I. Engraving of Parson's Portrait 

The portrait of Person, by Hoppner, now in the University 
Library, was engraved by William Sharp. The plate was 
given to the University in 1869, under the circumstances 
explained in the following letters*. 

1 Cambridge Vnivernty Reporter, 1892-93, p. 133. For the Grace see 
p. 299. 

s Registry of the University, Prizei, 48, 2, 8. 



Engraving of Porson's Portrait 123 



1. Rev. Charles Burney to Rev, Benj, Hall Kennedy, D,D,, 
Regius Professor of Oreek. 

WicKHAif Bishops Rkctort, Witham. 
Bee. 18, 1869. 
Reverend Sib, 

You will, I tniflt, pardon me for troubling you on the subject 
of this note. My grandfather was one of the original Promoters of the 
Fund which many years after led to the Establishment of the Porson 
Prize. One of the objects to which a portion of the money subscribed 
was applied was an Engraving of a Portrait of Person, a Copy of which 
was I believe given to each Subscriber. 

The Plate for this Engraving has always been in our Family, and on 
the death of my Father descended to me. I am anxious to find a good 
destination for it, and it has occiured to me that the Trustees of the 
Porson Prize, of which you are, I believe, ejc officio one, might like to 
possess it, and that an Impression might be presented to every 
successful Competitor for the Prize. I shall be most happy to fall in 
with any arrangement which you and your Brother Trustees may deem 
best, as I feel that the Plate might be in better hands than mina 

Believe me always. Reverend Sir, 

Your obedient Servant, 

Charles Burnet. 



2. Professor Kennedy to the Vice-Chancellor, 

The College, Elt. 

December 22, 1869. 
Dear Mr Yios-Chancbllor, 

I presume that I ought to place in your hands the enclosed 
letter, and I have so informed the writer, returning thanks to him for 
his kind offer. 

I am not aware who are the official persons on whom it will devolve 
to consider the proposal. 

Believe me, dear Mr Yice-Chancellor, 

Yours very faithfully, 

B. H. Kennedy. 



124 The Porson Pi^ize 



3. Minute of the Council of the Senate, 31 January, 1870. 

Mr Bumey had written to Dr Kennedy to say that he possessed the 
Plate from which the engravings of Porson were taken, and that he 
wished to give it to the Trustees in order, if they should think fit, that 
a number of impressions should be struck off and one given annually 
to each successful competitor for the Porson Prize. 

As the Chancellor, Masters, and Scholars were really the Trustees, 
the Council thought that the Plate might be accepted and kept in the 
Registrary's Office^, with a view to its being used in the manner 
suggested by Mr Burney. 

II. The Prize, 

The following indenture was read to the Senate, and 
ordered to be sealed, 28 May, 1816*; but no regulations were 
drawn up until 1898, when a Report of the Council, dated 
23 May, containing those at present in force, was confirmed 
by the Senate (9 June)'. 

J7 Nov. 1816. This Indenture made the twenty-seventh day of November in the 
fifty-seventh year of the reign of our sovereign Lord George the Third... 
and in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixteen 

Between the Reverend Charles Bumey Doctor in Divinity Rector of 

Saint Paul Deptford in the County of Kent and the Reverend John 

Cleaver Banks of Kensington in the County of Middlesex, Master of 

Arts, of the one part; and the Chancellor Masters, and Scholars of 

the University of Cambridge of the other part 

Oxli^ of Whereas in the life-time of the late learned Richard Person, Master 

of Arts, Professor of Greek in the said University of Cambridge, divers 

individuals, desirous of doing honour to his attainments, raised by 

subscription among themselves a sum of money, which was intended 

to be wholly applied for his benefit, and the management and 

application thereof were committed to several trustees, of whom the 

said Charles Burney and John Cleaver Banks are now the only survivors 

After And whereas it happened that the interest only of the said fund 

deaS°the ^^^ received by the said Richard Porson during his life; and, the 

diBpow <»P principal being and remaining undisposed of at his death, it was agreed 

the fond. ^^^ determined by the original subscribers, assembled by public 

^ It is now (1903) in the Registry. 

' It is probable that a draft only of the deed was read on this occasion ; 
for, as Been below, the deed, as engrossed, is dated 27 November; and the 
*' Sealing Book" shews that the University Seal was not affixed until 
10 February, 1817. 

' Ordinances, ed. 1901, p. 582. 



the fond. 



The Porson Prize 126 

advertisement, that the same should be applied to such purposes as 

the Trustees themselves should chuse 

And whereas in pursuance of this determination, after various 

dispositions of parts of the said fund, the said Charles Burney and 

John Cleaver Banks lately proposed to the said Chancellor Masters 

and Scholars to transfer into their names in the public funds so much 

capital stock as would produce the yearly siun of twenty pounds to be Anniud 

applied yearly in the purchase of one or more Qreek Book or Books £so to be 

which shoxild be given as an annual prize to be called the Porson twSt tnui£- 

University Prize according to the adjudication of the Vice-Chancellor Greek vene. 

of the said University for the time being or his lawful deputy and such 

other Examiners as hereinafter mentioned for the best Translation in 

Greek verse written by an undergraduate of the said University of 

such passages and in such Metres as hereinafter mentioned 

And the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars havins asreed to -^^P^f^,^ 

* , Bum of £400 

accept such capital stock upon trust to apply the same to the purpose tranrfored 

proposed, the said Charles Burney and John Cleaver Banks have on ponxwe to 

the day of the date- of these presents transferred into the names "^•"v- 

of the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars the capital sum of four 

hundred pounds Navy five poimds per cent. Annuities, and the same 

is now standing in their names in the Books of the Governor and 

Company of the Bank of England as they the said Chancellor, Masters 

and Scholars do hereby acknowledge. 

Now this Indenture witnesseth that in further execution of the 
purpose aforesaid It is hereby declared and agreed by and between 
the parties hereto that the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars and 
their successors shall stand and be possessed of and interested in the 
said capital sum of four hundred pounds Navy five pounds per cent. 
Annuities and of the dividends, interest and yearly produce of the 
same 

Upon trust that the said dividends, interest and yearly produce The interest 
shall be for ever yearly and every year laid out and expended in the to be umT 
purchase of one or more Greek book or books to be chosen by the fngbo^"^' 
Vice-Chancellor of the said University for the time being or his lawful " • P'*'®- 
deputy, which book or books shall yearly, at the Commencement, be 
given as a prize for Greek verses by the name of The Porson University 
Pritey according to the rules and regulations hereinafter contained and 
set forth, that is to say, 

The Verses shall be a translation of a passage or passages in some What 
play of Shakespeare or of Ben Jonson or of Massinger or of Beaumont be tiSl-"*^ 
and Fletcher, selected by the Vice-Chancellor or his deputy, and ***** 
announced or published a reasonable time before the Commencement. 

The Metre of the Translation, if the selection be from a Tragedy, Metres to 
shall be Tragicum lambicum Trimetnun Acatalecticum or Tragicum 
Trochaicum Tetrametrum CcUcUecticum, If the selection be from a 
Comedy, the Metre of the Translation shall be Comicum lambicum 



126 



The Parson Prize 



Who may 
becmndi- 
dates. 



Who an to 
examine. 



The prise 
tranuatlon 
most be 
printed and 
redtodin 
the Senate 

HOOM. 



To be 
tranacrlbed 
into a folio 
book kept 
br the Vice- 
Cnianoellor. 

What ii to 
be done 
when no 
prise is 
adjudged. 



Trimetrum AcatcUecticum or Comicum Trochaicum Tetrametrum Cata- 
lecticum or Camicum Anapcegticum Tetrametrum CcUcUecticum, 

All Undergraduates in the University may be candidates, but they 
must send their Translations distinctly written and accentuated, and 
accompanied by literal Versions of the Greek in Latin prose to the 
Vice-Chancellor's Lodge, on or before the day appointed by him or his 
deputy for that purpose. 

The Examiners shall be the Vice-Chanoellor or his deputy with the 
Provost of King's College, the Masters of Trinity College, St John's 
College, Christ's College and Caius College, the Public Orator and the 
Greek Professor, or such of them as can attend ; and the prize shall be 
given to the author of the translation which the Examiners or a majority 
of them shall adjudge the best (and the Vice-Chancellor or his deputy 
shall have a casting vote if necessary), on condition that such prize 
translation be printed, and copies given to the Chancellor, the Vice- 
Chancellor, and the Heads of Houses, by the successful candidate 
previous to the Commencement, and that the same be recited by the 
author in the Senate-House at the Commencement. The plans adopted 
in the case of Sir William Browne's Prizes shall be followed as far as 
relates to ascertaining the author of the prize translation, without 
disclosure of the names of the other candidates. The prize translation 
shall be transcribed into a folio book to be kept by the Vice-Chanoellor 
for the time being, and not to go out of his custody except annually, 
for the purpose of receiving transcripts of prize verses, or of being 
produced in the Senate-House. 

If in any year no worthy candidate shall appear, the book or books 
provided for that year shall be reserved, and given to the candidate 
whose translation shall be adjudged by the Examiners to be the second 
best, or next in merit to the prize translation, and worthy to be 
rewarded, in the next subsequent year ; and so from time to time the 
book or books provided for any year, and not given in that year as 
a prize, shall be reserved till the Examiners shall adjudge the same to 
be given, in some subsequent year, to a candidate whose translation 
shall be the second best or third best to the prize translation, but 
worthy to be rewarded, and then shall be disposed of accordingly; 
provided that every candidate, whose translation is second best or 
third best, to whom such reward shall be adjudged, shall be subject to 
the like condition of printing at his expense and distributing and 
reciting his translation as the author of the prize translation ; and 
every such second best or third best translation shall be transcribed 
into the same book as the prize translation of the year in which it 
shall be produced. 

In witness whereof the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars have 
caused their common seal to be hereunto affixed, and the said Charles 
Bumey and John Cleaver Banks have hereunto set their hands and 
seals the day and year first above written. 



The Porson Scholarship 127 

Memorandum, — If in any year the whole sum of twenty pounds ifthepriie 

shall not happen to be expended in the pri7ie book or books, the surplus £30 the 

shall be given to the same candidate as shall obtain the book or books Jh^into the 

as a prize or reward for his translation K pnieman. 

III. The Scholarship. 

This Indenture, made the twenty-seventh day of January in the ^ ^***' ***** 
year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty-eight between 
John Chapman of No. 2, Leadenhall Street in the City of London, Esq. 
and Samuel Metcalfe Latham, of Dover in the County of Kent, Esq. 
executors of the Reverend John Cleaver Banks late of Dover aforesaid, 
clerk, but now deceased, of the first part ; the Venerable Charles Parr 
Bumey, Doctor in Divinity, Archdeacon of Colchester, the sole admini- 
strator of the goods and chattels rights and credits of the Reverend 
Charles Burney Doctor in Divinity Rector of Saint Pauls Deptford in 
the County of Kent deceased of the second part ; and the Chancellor 
Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge of the third part. 

Whereas in the lifetime of the late learned Richard Person, Master Origiii of 
of Arts, Professor of Greek in the University of Cambridge, divers 
individuals, desirous of doing honour to his attainments, raised by 
subscription among themselves a sum of money, which was intended 
to be wholly applied for his bene6t, and the application thereof was 
committed to several trustees, of whom the Reverend Charles Bumey 
Doctor in Divinity and the said Reverend John Cleaver Banks both 
now deceased were the two survivors ; 

And whereas it happened that the interest only of the said fund was After 
received by the said Richard Person during his life ; and the principal death the 
being uhdisposed of at his death, it was determined by the original dispose of 
subscribers, assembled by public advertisement, that the same should be ® "° • 
applied to such purposes as the then trustees themselves should choose ; 

And whereas in pursuance of such determination after disposing of Print from 
part of the said fund in engraving a print from the portrait of the said oonnSt has 
Richard Person by Hoppner for* distribution amongst the surviving graTed^' 
subscribers to the said fund and for other purposes connected with the 
said trust the said Charles Bumey and John Cleaver Banks transferred 
into the names of the said Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the said 
University the sum of Four hundred pounds Navy five pounds per 
cent, annuities part of the said fund, upon certain trusts for establishing The Porson 
an annual prize to be called The Porson University Prize, to be pSie^*^ 
adjudicated in the manner set forth in an indenture dated the twenty- S55!i? 
seventh day of November one thousand eight hundred and sixteen and 
made between the said Charles Burney and John Cleaver Banks of 
the one part and the said Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the 
other part; 

^ Registry of the University, Box G. 16. 



128 



The Porson Scholarship 



Monmnent 
lnTriii.CoIl. 
ChApelhas 
boon erected. 



A I 

•hip In- 
tended. 



Amount of 

reeidueof 

troBt-fond. 



Preient 
amount of 
fund with 
Intereet 



Seeldae and 
Interest of 
fund has 
now been In- 
vested In 



And whereas the residue of the said fiiad remained in the hands of 
the said Charles Bumey ; 

And whereas other parts of the said fund so remaining in the 
hands of the said Charles Burnej were afterwards applied with the 
concurrence of the said John Cleaver Banks to erecting a Monument 
in the Chapel of Trinity College Cambridge to the memory of the said 
Professor Richard Porson and in the payment of other expenses 
connected therewith; 

And whereas it was always the intention of the said trustees that 
the residue of the said fund should, when and so soon as the same 
should accumulate to a sum sufficient for that purpose, be applied 
in founding a scholarship in the said University, to be called The 
Porson Scholarship; 

And whereas on the decease of the said Charles Bumey the said 
John Cleaver Banks became sole trustee of the said fund but he 
permitted the residue thereof which remained in the hands of the said 
Charles Bumey at the time of his decease to be retained by the said 
Charles Parr Bumey as such administrator as aforesaid ; 

And whereas since the erection of the said monument the said 
Charles Parr Bumey hath at the request of the said John Cleaver 
Banks from time to time expended various sums on account of the 
said trust whereby the same hath ultimately become reduced to the 
sum of six hundred and seventy-one pounds two shillings and eight 
pence; 

And whereas the said Charles Parr Bumey hath voluntarily allowed 
interest from time to time on the balances of the said trust fund 
remaining in his hands at and after the rate of five pounds per cent 
per annum ; And whereas the residue of the said fund with the 
interest so as aforesaid allowed by the said Charles Parr Bumey now 
amounts to the sum of One thousand seven hundred and sixty-four 
pounds four shillings and seven pence and no more ; And whereas 
after deducting from the said sum of one thousand seven hundred and 
sixty-four pounds four shillings and seven pence the sum of thirty-one 
pounds six shillings and three pence for the expenses of preparing and 
executing these presents and for other necessary expenses incident 
thereto there remains the sum of One thousand seven hundred and 
thirty-two pounds eighteen shillings and four pence applicable for the 
purpose of founding the said Scholarship ; 

And whereas the said John Cleaver Banks departed this life on the 
second day of May in the year one thousand eight hundred and forty- 
five having by his last will and testament in writing appointed his 
nephew the said John Chapman and his friend the said Samuel 
Metcalfe Latham executors thereof who afterwards duly proved the 
same will in the prerogative court of Canterbury ; And whereas the 
said John Cleaver Banks as such surviving trustee of the said fund 
being desirous of carrying into effect the intention of himself and his 



7%6 Por807i Scholarship 129 

late CO- trustee the said Charles Bumey did prior to his decease deter- luuna of 
mine to cause the residue of the said trust fund and the interest etc*^ 
thereon to be invested in the purchase of three pounds per cent 
Consolidated Bank Annuities (in the same manner as the hereinbefore 
mentioned sum of four hundred pounds Navy five pound per cent, 
annuities were invested) in the names of the Chancellor Masters and 
Scholars of the University of Cambridge in the books of the Qovemor 
and Company of the Bank of England and that a declaration of the 
trusts of the said fiind should be executed by all the proper parties 
in the manner hereinafter expressed but such last mentioned intention 
not having been carried into effect in the lifetime of the said John 
Cleaver Banks the said John Chapman and Samuel Metcalfe Latham 
as his executors have requested the said Charles Parr Biu*ney to lay 
out the said residue and the interest thereon in the purchase of the 
sum of one thousand nine hundred and forty-one pounds twelve 
shillings and tenpence three pounds per cent. Consolidated Bank 
Annuities in the names of the Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the 
University of Cambridge which the said Charles Parr Burney hath 
accordingly done this day. 

Now this Indentiu^ witnesseth and it is hereby declared and This money 
agreed by and between the parties hereto that the Chancellor Masters late tui the 
and Scholars of the University of Cambridge shall stand and be fi^i^e 
possessed of and interested in the said sum of One thousand nine ^^ofwhteh 
hundred and forty-one pounds twelve shillings and ten pence three ^^*be^d 
pounds per cent. Consolidated Bank annuities upon the trusts and for fei^®"°° 
the ends intents and purposes following, (that is to say) upon trust to 
lay out and invest the dividends interest and yearly proceeds of the 
said Bank annuities from time to time, when and as they shall be 
receivable, and also of the accumulations thereof, in the purchase of 
the like Bank annuities, in order that the same may accumulate at 
compound interest for the purpose of forming a fund for establishing 
and founding in the said University a scholarship to be called The 
Porsan Scholarship ; and when and as soon as the said fund shall by 
accumulations or otherwise have amounted to such a sum as will 
produce the yearly income of sixty-five pomids, then upon trust to pay 
the interest dividends and annual proceeds of the said fund, or a com- 
petent part thereof at the discretion of the said Chancellor Masters and 
Scholars unto the person who for the time being shall be elected to 
the Person Scholarship hereinafter mentioned, so and in such manner 
as that such scholar and his successors shall receive an exhibition of 
not less than sixty pounds per annum ; and to permit and suffer the Beeldae to 
residue or surplus of the said dividends interest and annual proceeds ***"™ 
of the said fund and also the arrears of stipend, which may at any 
time accrue during the vacancy of the said scholarship, to accumulate 
for the general piu-poses of the said trust ; and it is hereby further 
agreed and declared that, as soon as conveniently may be after the 
C. 9 



130 



The Por8on Scholarship 



Scholar to 
be elected as 
Boon as the 
income has 
reached jges. 



Regulations 
for the 
Hcholarship. 



expiration of six calendar monthH from the period at which the yearly 
income arising from the said fund shall have amounted to the sum of 
sixty-five pounds per annum, the said Chancellor Masters and Scholars 
shall proceed to the election of a fit and proper person, according to 
the regulations hereinafter contained, to hold the Person Scholarship 
hereby founded ; and that a fit and proper person shall in like manner 
be elected from time to time, when and as ofken as any vacancy shall 
occur therein ; and it is hereby further agreed and declared that the 
election to the said scholarship shall be made in the manner hereinafter 
mentioned, and the same shall be held subject to the rules and regu- 
lations hereinafter contained : 

1 . That any undergraduate shall be eligible to the said scholarship, 
who shall have been matriculated, and shall not have resided in the 
University more than five terms. 

2. That on or before th first day of December next after the 
occurrence of any vacancy, public notice shall be given declaring the 
said vacancy and the time of examination ; and that every candidate 
shall signify his intention of presenting himself for examination in a 
Latin epistle to each of the electors on or before the thirty-first day 
of December. 

3. That the electors shall be the Vice-Chancellor, the Provost of 
King's College, the Master of Trinity College, the Master of St John's 
College, the Master of Christ's College, the Master of Caius College, 
the Public Orator, and the Greek Professor. 

4. That the examination shall be exclusively classical, and shall 
commence in the last week of January, at the same time as the exami- 
nation of the candidates for the other University Scholarships. 

6. That the Person Scholar shall reside during the major part 
of every term, unless prevented by sickness or other cause to be 
approved of by the Vice-Chanoellor and a majority of the other 
electors. 

6. That the Person Scholar shall not hold any other University 
Scholarship ; and that he shall vacate his scholarship at the expiration 
of three years and a half from the Christmas-day preceding his election, 
so as to be entitled to seven half-yearly payments. 

In witness whereof the said parties hereto of the first and second 
parts have hereunto set their hands and seals and the said Chancellor 
Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge have hereunto 
affixed their common seal the day and year first above written^. 



1 From the original in the Begifitry of the University, Box G. 20. 



Sheepshanks Fund 131 



9. Benefaction of Richard Sheepshanks and 
Anne Sheepshanks, 1859, 1863. 

a. Exhibition at Trinity College. 
6. The Observatory. 

Richard Sheepshanks became a member of Trinity College 
in 1812, and graduated B.A. in 1816, M.A. in 1819. He 
was elected to a fellowship in 1817, which he retained 
till his death. He devoted himself to scientific pursuits, 
chiefly astronomical, among which the active promotion 
of the building of the Cambridge Observatory should be 
particularly mentioned. He died 4 May, 1855 \ 

Three years afterwards, 2 December, 1858, the University 
was informed in a letter written to the Vice-Chancellor by 
Mr Airy, Astronomer Royal, that the representatives of 
Mr Sheepshanks proposed to offer an endowment of £10,000 
stock 3 p. c. consols for the following purposes : 

For the establishment of an Astronomical Exhibition in Trinity 
College ; for the promotion of the Science of Astronomy in the Uni- 
versity of Cambridge ; and for the rendering efficient the Cambridge 
Observatory for the benefit of Astronomy, or of Terrestrial Magnetism 
or Meteorology, or of such other ^iences as usually are or may be 
continuously followed in an Obeen^atory. 

Mr Airy's letter was read to the Senate 9 December, 
1858, when a letter of thanks, written by the Public Orator, 
was ordered to be sealed. 

In the following year (1 February, 1859), a deed, printed 
below, was drawn up between the parties concerned and 
Miss Sheepshanks ; the preamble to which sets forth that, 
"out of regard to the memory of her brother, and to promote 
the study of those Sciences to which he had specially devoted 
his talents," she had determined to appropriate the above 
sum on certain conditions. 

^ Life in Diet, of Nat. Biogr. 111. 9. 

9—2 



132 Sheepshanks Fund 

In 1863 Mr Airy informed the Vice-Chancellor of a 
further gift from Miss Sheepshanks, for the exclusive benefit 
of the Observatory : 

Royal Observatory, Greenwich, London, S.E. 
February 25, 1863. 

Sir, 

I have the honor to communicate to you, for the information 
of the Council and Senate of the University of Cambridge, that, on 
November 24, 1860, Miss Sheepshanks transferred to my name the sum 
of £2000, then in the hands of Messrs Overend, Gumey and Co., to be 
employed [under the approval of the Master of Trinity and myself i] for 
the benefit of the Cambridge Observatory, with special preference for 
its employment in the purchase of one or more large Instruments, or 
Classes of Instruments, if such should be required for the Observatory ; 
and that the money has been lying from that time in Messrs Overend 
and Gume/s hands, with interest upon it at the rate usually allowed 
by bill-discounting firms, namely, 1 yier cent, below the Bank Rate of 
Discount ; and without any diminution or engagement, except that, at 
the request of the Vice-Chancellor and Obsenatorj' Syndicate, I under- 
took by letter to the Master of Trinity College, dated December 5, 
1862, to defray from it the cost of a Chronographic Apparatus, at an 
estimated expenoe of £80. 

It appears to me that it would now be convenient that the sum in 
question, with its accrual of Interest, but subject to the engagement 
which I have specified, should be transferred to the absolute control 
of the University, in Trust to be employed for the benefit of the 
Observatory, with special preference for its employment in the purchase 
of one or more large Instruments, or classes of Instruments, if such 
should be required for the Observatory. And I request that you will 
have the goodness to state in my name to the Council and Senate of 
the University that, in the event of the Senate expressing their willing- 
ness to accept the said monies on these terms, I am prepared at once 
to transfer the whole to the Vice-Chancellor or other authorized Officer 
of the University. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, [etc.] 

G. B. Airy. 

^ These words are inserted from a letter addressed by Mr Airy to the 
Vioe-Ghanoellor on the same subject, 17 February, 1863. Both letters are in 
the Begistxy, Vol. xxix. 54, 64^ 



Deed of Trmt 133 

This letter was read 12 March, 1863, when the following 
Grace, accepting the gift and thanking Miss Sheepshanks 
and Mr Airy, passed the Senate : 

Quuni secundum litteras modo recitatas vir eximius Georgius 
BiDDELL Airy, LL.D. i)ecutiia8 qu88 olim sibi a lectiusiiua femina Anna 
Sheepshanks in usum speculee vestrsB astronomicse expendendse in 
nianum tradobautur ip«i academisB transferendas oa lege obtulerit ut 
secundum conditionea modo recitatas erogentur : 

Placeat vobis ut illud donum a vobis sub dictis conditionibus acci- 
piatur, deputetimjue DominiLs Procancellarius qui dictas pecunias 
vestro nomine accipiat; atque ut gratia) vestro nomine agantur a 
Procancellario viro eximio O. B. Airy, et rogetur idem uti gratum 
vestrum auimum fcminie eximise Annas Sheepshanks propter singularem 
ipsius mimificentiam notum faciat. 



Declaration of Trtist, daied 1 February, 1859. 

This Indenture made the first day of February one thousand eight Parties to 
hundred and fifty nine Between Anne Sheepshanks of London Road ***®*®®^ 
Reading in the County of Berks Spinster of the first part; The 
Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge of 
the second part ; The Master Fellows and Scholars of Trinity College 
in the University of Cambridge of the third part ; and Qeorge Biddell 
Airy of the Royal Observatory Greenwich Astronomer Royal of the 
fourth part. 

Whereas the said Anne Sheepshanks out of regard for the memory 
of her Brother the Reverend Richard Sheepshanks late fellow of 
Trinity College in the University of Cambridge deceased and to promote 
the study of those Sciences to which her said Brother especially devoted 
his Talents has determined to appropriate a sum of Ten Thousand £10,0003 p. c. 
Pounds Bank Three Pounds per cent, consolidated Annuities to be held 
uiK)n the trusts hereinafter declared thereof and she has accordingly 
transferred that sum of Stock into the names of the said Master Fellows 
and Scholars in the Books of the Qovemor and Company of the Bank 
of England; 

Now this Indenture witnesseth that it is hereby agreed and declared ^ beheld 
that the said sum of Ten Thousand Pounds Bank Three Pomids c^Uegeon 
per cent, consolidated Annuities and the Dividends and Annual Income 
thereof shall be held by the said Master Fellows and Scholars upon 
the following trusts that is to say : 

First : As regards one sixth part of the said Ten Thousand Pounds 

Stock. One sixth 

First, in trust to preserve the capital of such one sixth part which S^t2 ^t 
Capital is not under any circumstances to be diminished. miS?«h}^ 



trust 



134 



Sheepshatiks Fund 



Dividends 
to be applied 
to maintsiii 
the "Sheep- 
shankB As- 
tronomical 
ExhibiUon" 
in the 
College. 



If there be 
no Exhibi- 
tioner the 
income is to 
be applied 
to increase 
that of the 
remaining 
five sixths. 

The remain- 
ing five 
sixths of the 
capital not 
to be di- 
minished. 

The divi- 
dends to be 
used to 
promote the 
Science of 
Astronomv 
in the Uni- 
versity of 
Cambridge ; 
and to ren- 
der the Ob- 
servatory 
efficient. 
No money 
to be spent 
on the 
Professor, 
or on 
building, 
or purchase 
of land. 



On observa- 
tions and 
calculations. 



On instru- 
ments and 
on the pav- 
ment of Ob- 
servers and 
Computers. 

The applica- 
tion of the 
dividends 



Second, In trust to apply the Dividends and Annual Income thereof 
to the maintenance of an Exhibition to bo called the ^ Sheepshanks 
Astronomical Exhibition " and such Exhibition shall be given to that 
Undergraduate of the University of Cambridge elected by the Master 
and Seniors of Trinity Collie who shall be found upon notice of compe- 
tition publicly given and examination held by them or by persons 
appointed by them to be best and sufficiently versed in Astronomy 
theoretical and practical ; and the jxirson so elected if not a Student 
of Trinity College shall thereupon become a Student of Trinity Collie ; 
and shall retain the Exhibition for three years on condition that he 
shall keep by residence every University Term of that time except in 
so far as he may have permission of non-residence granted to him by 
the Master and Seniors of Trinity CoUega 

Third, And in trust as to any Dividends and Annual income 
accruing due at any time or times when from any cause whatsoever 
there shall not be a person holding tlie said Exhibition to apply the 
same as if the same were Income of the remaining five sixths of the 
said sum of Stock. 

Second : As regards the remaining five sixth parts of the said Ten 
Thousand Pounds Stock. 

First, In trust to preserve the Capital of such five sixth ^larts which 
Capital is not under any circumstances to be diminished. 

Second, In trust to apply the Dividends and Annual income thereof 
to the promotion of the Science of Astronomy in the University of 
Cambridge and to the rendering efficient the Cambridge Observatory 
for the benefit of Astronomy or of Terrestrial Magnetism or Meteorology 
or such other Sciences as usually are or may be continuously followed 
in an Observatory in the manner and under the regulations following 
(that is to say) : 

There shall not be any ^lart of the Dividends or annual Income 
applied directly or indirectly to the benefit of the Professor or other 
principal Director of the Cambridge Observatory or to the purchasing 
or acquiring any land or building or to the erection or enlargement of 
any building for residence ; 

But such Dividends and Income shall be applied to all or any of 
the following purposes The causing to be made the best possible 
observations and calculations for advancing the Science of Astronomy 
(whether Physical Gravitational or Mensiurative) the Sciences of Ter- 
restrial Magnetism and Meteorology or any other Sciences which 
usually are or may be continuously followed in an Observatory ; 

The procuring Instruments and erecting buildings proper for and 
appropriated to the said observations and the payment of Actual 
Observers and Actual Computers personally employed on the said 
Observations and Calculations. 

Third, The Observatory Syndicate or other body (if any) appointed 
for the time being in this behalf by Qrace of the Senate of the 



Deed of Tnist 136 

University of Cambridge shall be the Managing Body to regulate the ^^{JfJ^^ 
application of the Dividends and Annual Income. obmrvatory 

Fourth, On some day in the month of November or December in i„ ^^jj ' 
every year the Managing Body shall through their Chairman present *i,e*Mm 
to the Master and Seniors of Trinity College through the Master a ^JS^S^aent 
Statement of the several purposes for which Money will be required by the chair- 
during the next year and of the estimated sum necessary to effect those Master of 
purposes, and the Master and Seniors shall take the said Statement college, 
into their consideration and if in the judgment of the Master and 
Seniors the purposes specified shall be included in the purposes for 
which the Dividends and annual Incomes are to be applied as aforesaid 
but not otherwise then the Bursar of Trinity College shall pay from gt}»e 
this fiiud to the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge for approveB the 
the time being to be expended by direction of the Managing Body the pay the 
total sum required or so much thereof as the Dividends and annual '"^°*^' 
Income available shall amount to. And on the next application of the ^^^°^ 
Managing Body an Account with proper Vouchers shall be rendered Toucherato 
by them to the Master and Seniors of Trinity College and any un- The un- 
applied balance shall be refunded by the said Vice-Chancellor to the ^n*^to 
Bursar of Trinity College for this Fund and if the Master and Seniors ^jj^*** ^ 
approve of the Account the Master of Trinity College shall attach his Aooount to 
Signature to it which shall be conclusive evidence of such approval S^JSJ.**^ '^^ 
and a complete discharge to the Managing Body. 

Fifth, All unapplied Dividends and annual Income shall be in- Jf ^**'°®'** 
vested in Bank Three Pounds per Centum Consolidated Annuities and Jf^^^^^ 
such Bank Annuities and all the resulting Income thereof shall be 
applied as the dividend and annual income of the original five sixth 
parts of the said sum of Stock and any Bank annuities so acquired 
with miapplied Dividends or Annual Income may from time to time 
be sold and the proceeds applied accordingly. 

Tldrd: As r^^rds the whole of the Trust funds. 

First : Once in every year on a day to be named by the Vice- 22^ °' 
Chancellor of the University of Cambridge for the time being the CoUegeto 
Bursar of Trinity College shall lay before the Auditors of the Accounts auditors of 
of the University a Statement of Account accompanied with proper an°annuaf 
Vouchers of all their receipts and payments and investments and sales "f account 
if any from the date of these presents or the last preceding account as 
the case may be and such statement of Account when approved and 
signed by the Auditors shall be a complete discharge to the Master 
Fellows and Scholars. 

Second: The jurisdiction given to the Master and Seniors shall Nosoedai 
in reference to votes deputies and otherwise be deemed to be part of ^^^ ^^^ 
their ordinary jurisdiction, and be exercisable accordingly, and any becaUed. 
ordinary meeting of the Master and Seniors shall subject to the express 
power hereinafter contained as to the said George Biddell Airy be 
sufi&cient fur the exercise of the jurisdiction hereby given to the Meuster 



136 Bemf action of Dr Whewdl 

and Seniors without any convening of the Meeting for the purposes of 

this Deed, 
o. B. Alrj Third : The said George Biddell Airy shall during his life be 

gsrded as considered for the purposes of this Deed as an additional Senior Fellow 
FeUow of of Trinity College and shall vote accordingly, and he shall have sent to 
cSSti^for ^^^ ^y po»t addressed to his usual residence notice of each Meeting 
oflfiS'^eed! ®^ *^® Master and Seniors at which anything shall be contemplated 

being done under these presents such notice being posted at Cambiidge 

at least seven clear days before the Meeting and stating what is so 

contemplated being done. 

In witness whereof the said ^larties to these presents have hereunto 

set their hands and seals the day and year first above written ^ 

10. Benefaction of Wilijam Whewell, 1866. 

a. Professorship. 

b. Scholarships. 

Dr Whewell, Master of Trinity College, by Will dated 
17 December, 1863, bequeathed certain funds in trust to 
Trinity College for the maintenance of a Professor and 
Scholars in International Law. 

Dr Whewell died 6 March, 1866 ; and in the following 
Michaelmas term (22 November) a Syndicate was appointed 
to discuss the proposal, to take legal advice, and to confer 
with the authorities of Trinity College. These Syndics 
issued a report dated 21 November, 1867, containing regu- 
lations for the Professorship and Scholarships ; and in an 
appendix they printed an extract from Dr Whe well's Will, 
the Case which they had submitted to Counsel, and the 
Opinion furnished to them by the said Counsel. This 
report was confirmed by two Graces 12 December, 1867. 

The Will (I.) and the Opinion (II.) are printed below. 

I. Extract from Dr WhewdPs WUl, dated 
17 December, 1863*. 

This is the last Will and Testament of me The Reverend William 
Whewell Doctor in Divinity Master of Trinity College in the University 
of Cambridge. ... 

And whereas I am seized of or entitled to certain freehold ground 
and hereditaments situate in the town of Cambridge abutting on 

^ From the original in the Registry of the University, Box G. 14. 

' The omitted passages are printed in EndowmetUtt ed. 1876, pp. 112 (1) — 
112 (8). 



Dr Whetveirs WUl 137 

Trinity Street and All Saints' Passage on which I have erected BuUdings 
buildings for the reception and habitation of members of Trinity riven to 
College aforesaid and which buildings are accordingly now occupied coiie^ 
by members of that College being considered and used as a court or 
hostel belonging to such College : 

And whereas I am also seized of or entitled to certain other ground 
buildings and premises adjoining to the firstly hereinbefore mentioned 
ground towards the east and forming one entire area : And it is my 
intention that other buildings shall be erected on the said area for 
the like purposes as the said buildings which I have already erected : 

Now I do hereby give and devise unto the Master Fellows and 
Scholars of Trinity College aforesaid and their successors for ever... 
the said buildings so erected by me and the site thereof and all other 
the land or ground forming the area hereinbefore mentioned. And 
which said buildings and the site thereof together with the said area 
taken altogether is bounded on the west by Trinity Street on the 
east by Sidney Street on the north by All Saints' Passage and on the 
south by premises respectively belonging to the trustees of Forester's 
Charity and Morgan Treheme Esquire. 

And all buildings which may be erected or standing thereon at my Baiidinp 
decease upon trust and to the intent that the said buildings already to be used 
erected and any other buildings which shall after my death be erected hostS'for ^' 
on the said area or any part thereof as hereinafter mentioned may be JJ^xiSnity 
a court or hostel or coui'ts or hostels belonging to the said College for College, 
the reception and habitation of members thereof and of such Professor 
and students of International Law as hereinafter mentioned on the 
payment of such rents for rooms or chambers therein as may be 
determined from time to time by the Master and Senior Fellows of 
the said College and generally upon the like terms (as near as may be) 
and under the same rules as other rooms or chambers in or belonging 
to the said College are assigned to students or members thereof. 

And I further direct that the clear rents to be received for such Rents after 
rooms or chambers and for the rooms or chambers in any other ofservanta' 
buildings to be erected as hereinafter mentioned and also for any other etc. to be 
buildings or premises erected on or forming part of the said area and ^pport two 
now or usually let as dwellinghouses or otherwise to persons who are g^hoilS*^ 
not members of the said College... shall after payment of all rates (>>u^^^^ 
taxes and other outgoings... be applied as hereinafter mentioned (that 
is to say) In the first place a competent part of such clear rents shall 
be applied fi'om my decease for ever as and for the endowment by way 
of stipend of two additional Scholarships in Trinity College aforesaid 
to be of the same value and subject to the same rules in all respects as 
the Foundation Scholarships of such Coll^ga 

And in the next place the surplus of such clear rents shall be Farther 
applied in the ei-ection at any time or times after my decease at the be erected 
discretion of the Master and Senior Fellows of the said College of any ^ ***® •'^ 



138 



Benefaction of Dr WheweU 



Profeaiorof 
Intenift- 

to receive 
jCSOO » year. 



8cholanhips 
in the h 
subject 



Electors. 



8ubject of 
the Pro- 
fessor's 
lectures. 



Number of 
lectures. 



buildings on any part or yarta of the hereinbefore mentioned area... 
and when and after such additional buildings... shall have been so 
erected such siuplus of the said clear rents shall be applied by the 
said Master Fellows and Scholars for the promotion of the study of 
International Law in the University of Cambridge by the appropriation 
thereout of such annual sum as hereinafter mentioned for the endow- 
ment by way of stipend of a Professorship in the said University to 
be called "The Professorship of International Law** (that is to say) 
in case I shall not have established and endowed such a Professorship 
in my lifetime then the annual sum of five hundred pounds but if I 
shall have established such a Professorship in my lifetime and endowed 
the same with less than five hundred pounds a year then such an 
annual sum as shall make up the said endowment of five hundred 
pounds a year and by the appropriation of the remaining part of such 
surplus or if such a Professorship shall have been established and 
endowed with five hmidred pounds a year by myself in my lifetime 
then the whole of such surplus for the establishment of other Scholar- 
ships in the University aforesaid to be obtained by proficiency in the 
subject of International Law and to be of such number and with such 
stipends either of one uniform amount or of different amounts and to 
be held for such time or times and subject to such rules and regulations 
as the Master and Senior Fellows of the said College shaU fix being 
not inconsistent with the Statutes of the University.... 

And I direct that the electors of the above-mentioned Professorship 
and Scholarships of International Law shall be the Vice-Chancellor for 
the time being of the University of Cambridge the Master for the time 
being of Trinity College aforesaid the Regius Professor for the time 
being in the said University of Civil Law and the Professors for the 
time being in the said University of Moral Philosophy of the Laws of 
England and of Political Economy and that the election by a majority 
of the above-mentioned electors shall in every case be valid and in case 
of an equality of votes the Master for the time being of Trinity College 
aforesaid shall have a double or casting vote but so nevertheless that 
the said Fund and the accumulations or the income thereof or any imrt 
thereof resi^ectivoly may bo applied at the discretion of the said Master 
and Senior Fellows in increasing the stiixsnd of the Professorship and 
the existing Scholarships for the time being of International Law or 
any of them. 

And I enjoin the said Professor of International Law in his lectiu-es 
and in all parts of his treatment of the subject of International Law to 
make it his aim to lay down such rules and to suggest such measures 
as may tend to diminish the evils of war and finally to extinguish war 
between nations. 

And my will is that the said Professor of International Law shall 
give at least twelve lectures on or in connection with that subject in 
every academic year commencing with Michaelmas Term and shall at 



Opinion of Coiinad on his Will 139 

the end of every such year produce to the Master and Senior Fellows of Certificate 
Trinity College aforesaid a certificate signed by at least ten resident br those" 
members of the said University either graduates or undeigraduates or au^SeS 
))artly one and partly the other that they have each of them attended 
ten at least of the said lectures in the preceding year. And if the said 
Professor do not produce such certificate then and so often as the same 
shall happen the said stipend for the year at the end of which such 
certificate ought to have been produced arising from the said endow- 
ment shall not be paid to the said Professor but shall be reserved and 
appropriated by the said College to form a fund out of which and the 
accumulations thereof (if any) other and additional Scholarshiiw of 
International Law shall be founded subject to the same regulations as 
the said original Scholarships....^ 

II. Opinion of Counsel, dated 12 March, 1867'^. 

In answer to the various qucstious contained in this case (which for 
convenience we have numbered in the margin) we arc of opinion as 
follows : 

1. The Will does not contemplate the making of any regulations 
by Trinity College for the governance of the Professor. As regards the 
Scholars the power of Trinity College in defining their numbers and 
stipends whether uniform or not and in fixing the rules and regulations 
to which they are to be subject is only limited by the qualification that 
such rules and regulations are not to be inconsistent with the Statutes 
of the University. Trinity College would from time to time have the 
power to vary those regulations. The University on its i^irt has the 
power to accept or reject the benefaction or its continuance if any 
regulations should be made of which it may disapprove. We cannot 
doubt that any regulations proposed by the University as esseutifil to 
their acceptance of the benefaction would be inserted in the rules 
and regulations made by Trinity College but should any serious differ- 
ence of opinion arise in this resi)ect it would be advisable to make a 
joint application to the Court of Chancery to frame a scheme in accord- 
ance with the interests of the benefaction. 

2. The University would have the same powers to make rules for 
the government and discipline or admonition or removal in case of 
misconduct or incompetence of the Professor or for the appointment 
of a deputy in case of illness or infirmity or for enforcing residence as 
it has always had in the case of Professorshi][)s subject to the qualifica- 
tion that such rules must not be inconsistent with the terms of the Will. 

3. Such rules might be imposed by Grace of the Senate (Statuta 
p. 65. 19 & 20 Vic. c. 88 § 17). 

> From a printed extract from the Will ciroulated by the Vice- Chancellor, 
20 October, 1866. Registry, Vol. xxxix. 30, 1. 

^ Cironlated by Vice-chancellor, 26 November, 1867. 



140 Benefaction of Miss Squire 

4. What persons are qualified to be the Scholars will depend upon 
the rules to be framed by Trinity College. 

5. There is nothing in the Will to compel the Scholars to become 
members of Trinity College. Should any such regulation be insisted 
upon by the College, we think it probable that the Court of Chancery 
might on petition disallow such a restriction as beyond the scope of 
the power of regulation given to the College. 

6. There is nothing in the Will to render it compulsory on the 
Scholars to reside in the Hostel. But as the Will would seem to give 
them a right to such residence we think it most desirable that the 
University and the College should if possible before the Benefaction is 
accepted endeavour to ag^;ee upon some plan agreeable to both with 
reference to this part of the Will 

7. The Master and Seniors of Trinity College may make r^i- 
latious as to the age or standing of candidates for scholarships or for 
their residence in the University after election or for their proceeding 
to degrees or for their having previously taken a degree or as to a 
Scholar forfeiting his Scholarship provided no such regulation be incon- 
sistent with any of the general laws of the University. 

8. If the University objects to any such r^ulations it might refuse 
to accept the Scholarships but it could not of its own power accept the 
benefaction and yet reject or modify any regulations made by Trinity 
College not inconsistent with the Statutes of the University. 

9. The University might accept the Professorship and reject the 
Scholai'ships or vice versa. 

10. The Election being by the Will to be made by " a Majority of 
the above mentioned electors " we think that no single elector could 
vote twice or oftener in more than one capacity. 

11. The Professorship should be established by Grace of the Senate 
but as to the form of the Grace and what it should include this is 
matter not of Law but of University practice. 

12. The provisions of the Will in regard to the certificate for 

stipend must be complied with. 

JOHN ROLT. 

12 March, 1867. ROUNDELL PALMER. 

JOHN BAILY. 

GEORGE DENMAN. 



11. Benefaction of Rebecca Flower Squire, 

1898. 

a. Law Library. 

6. Law Scholarships. 

Miss Rebecca Flower Squire, who died 26 November, 

1898, by Will dated 18 November, 1898, left her estate in 



Dedaralion of Trust 141 

trust (1) for the erection of a law library, the purchase and 
renewal of books, and the salary of the librarian ; (2) for 
the endowment of scholarships, exhibitions, or Professorships. 
The whole matter is set forth at full in the Declaration of 
Trust printed below. 

As regards the library, the Law School and Library 
Buildings Syndicate, in their report dated 8 May, 1900S state 
that they have obtained a design from T. G. Jackson, R.A., 
architect, for a room which, in accordance with the wish of 
the Squire Trustees, " will form a distinct and self-contained 
part of the whole building," and that this design has been 
approved by the Trustees. The Senate confirmed this report 
7 June, 1900, with the following additional Grace : 

That the oflfer of the Trustees under Miss Squire's Will to defray 
the cost of building a Law Library and of furnishing it with internal 
fittings be gratefully accepted and that the Library be named the 
Squire Law Library. 

The University was informed of that portion of the Will 
which relates to Scholarships by the Council of the Senate 
in a report dated 18 November, 1901*, to which the Scheme 
printed below was appended (in a slightly different form). 
This report was confirmed 12 December, 1901, by the 
following Grace : 

That the offer of the Trustees of the Will of the late Rebecca Flower 
Squire to found and endow Law Scholarships in the University of 
Cambridge be gratefully accepted. 



Declaration of Trust 

This Indenture made the eighth day of August one thousand nine Deed is 
himdred and two Between Edward Chester of Number 86 Kewington sAnga^, 
Butts London Solicitor and James Flower of Number 1 Angel Court 
Throgmorton Street in the City of London Stockbroker of the one part 
and The Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the University of Cam- 
bridge (hereinafter called " the University of Cambridge ") of the other 
part 



19Q2. 



1 Cambridge Univertity Repartery p. 848. See also the Discussion, 
p. 912. 

» Ibid., pp. 221-224. 



142 



Benefaction of Miss Squire 



ByWiU 

dated 

18 Not. 1898 

a trust is 

created. 



In virtue of 
which testa- 
tor's estate 
is to be 
spent on 
Exhibitions, 
Scholar- 
ships, Pro- 
fessorships, 
for Law and 
Divinity 
and on a 
Law Li- 
brary. 



WiU proved 
30 December 
189& 



£15,000 to be 
set aside for 
erection of a 
Law Library 
in Cam- 
bridge, and 
for contin- 
gent ex- 
penses. 



Scheme for 
erecting the 
Library 
approved 
in High 
Court of 
Justice 
30 July. 1900. 



Whereas Rebecca Flower Squire late of Number 127 Victoria Street 
Westminster Spinster deceased by her Will dated the Eighteenth day 
of November one thousand eight hundred .and ninety eight devised 
and bequeathed all and every her estate of what nature or kind soever 
and wheresoever situate unto the said Edward Chester and James 
Flower Upon trusts therein declared and in part hereinafter set forth 
that is to say : 

As to all the rest residue and remainder of her estate which should 
remain after paying and satisfying the various bequests annuities 
sums of money and stock therein mentioned and her debts and funeral 
and testamentary expenses that her Trustees should bold the same 
Upon trust to lay out expend apply or make over the same in such 
amoimts and shares and in all respects in such manner and form and 
subject to such terms rules provisions and restrictions whatsoever as 
her Trustees in the sole uncontrolled discretion of her Tnistees should 
please in founding endowing supporting and enlarging as to some in 
the name of her brother James William Squire and as to others in her 
own name at the University of Oxford as to some and at the Uni- 
versity of Cambridge as to the rest of exhibitions scholarships and 
pn^fessorships for law and divinity respectively and of a law library 
and of the librarian thereof and in the erection of a building for the 
law library and in the purchase of furniture and books therefor or some 
one or more of the said several purposes. 

And whereas the Testatrix died on the Twenty Sixth day of 
November one thousand eight hundred and ninety eight and her said 
Will was duly proved by the said Edward Chester and James Flower 
the Executors therein named on the Thirtieth day of December one 
thousand eight hundred and ninety eight 

And whereas the said Edward Chester and James Flower sometime 
since proposed in exercise of the discretion reposed in them by the said 
Will to apply the sum of Fifteen Thousand Pounds part of the re- 
siduary estate of the said Testatnx to or for the erection of a law 
library at the University of Cambridge and to or for furnishing the 
same and to apply further moneys or funds arising from the Testatrix's 
residuary estate in the purchase of books wherewith to stock the law 
library aforesaid, and to appropriate and invest other part of the said 
residuary estate in order that the income thereof might be applied for 
or towards the purchase of additions to or renewals of the books in 
the said library and in or towards the payment of the salary of the 
librarian. 

And whereas by an Order of the Chancery Division of the High 
Court of Justice dated the Thirtieth day of July one thousand nine 
hundred and made in an action entitled "Re Squire's Trusts Chester v. 
The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge 1900 S. No. 2416," in which 
the said Edward Chester and James Flower are Plaintiffs and the 
University of Oxford the University of Cambridge and the Attorney 



Declaration of Trust 143 

Qeneral are Defendants a Scheme set forth in the Schedule to the 

said Order for erecting the library aforesaid was duly approved by the 

Judge ; And it was ordered that the said Edward Chester and James 

Flower should be at liberty to carry such Scheme into effect and to 

set apart funds to answer the Fifteen Thousand Pounds proposed to 

be applied in building the said library and in providing fittings and 

furniture for the same. 

And whereas the said Edward Chester and James Flower after- £750ptobe 

Appued to 
wards proposed in further exercise of the discretion aforesaid to apply foundation 

and make over a sum of Seven Thousand Five Hundred Pounds New ment of 

Consols being or representing further part of the residuary estate iniiw. ^ 

of the Testatiix for the foundation endowment and support of 

Scholarships in Law at the University of Cambridge And they have it 

in contemplation hereafter to apply and make over further parts ofthe 

capital or corpus of the residuary estate of the said Testatrix and of 

the income thereof in extension of the aforesaid Scholarships in Law or 

in the foundation endowment and support of other Scholarships at the 

University of Cambridge 

And whereas by an Order dated the Thirtieth day of July one order »p- 
thousand nine hundred and one and made in the said action It was endowment 
in effect declared amongst other things that the establishment and ^ "y'l^^i. 
endowment of such Scholarships in Law at the University aforesaid 
were within the authority or discretion vested in the said Edward 
Chester and James Flower by the Will of the Testatrix 

And whereas the said Edward Chester and James Flower thereupon a deed to 
caused to be prepared the Draft of a Deed to be executed for the aforesaid 
purpose of establishing the aforesaid Scholarships in Law at the withreguia- 
University of Cambridge and of declaring trusts of the said sum of L^tteSV 
Seven Thousand Five Hundred Pounds New Consols and the income ^D©^m- 
thereof as an endowment for the said Scholarships in Law and for '^^''i*^^- 
setting forth a scheme or regulations for the said Scholarships and for 
the application and administration of the endowment thereof And 
they the said Edward Chester and James Flower submitted the afore- 
said Draft to the Senate of the University of Cambridge at a Congrega- 
tion holden on the Twelfth day of December one thousand nine 
hundred and one 

And whereas the Senate of the University of Cambridge at the Thla draft 
Congregation aforesaid consented to the establishment of the aforesaid tfe^nate/ 
Scholarships and agreed to accept the proposed endowment for the 
same and to administer the said Scholarships and the said endowment 
according to the scheme and regulations set forth in the aforesaid draft 

And whereas the aforesaid draft was afterwards amended in certain Draft 
respects under directions of the Court given in the said Action And CoS of ^ 
by an order dated the Twenty fourth day of July one thousand nine 24Ju^902. 
hundred and two and made in the said action the University of 
Cambridge by their Counsel accepting the said Draft as so amended 



144 Benefaction of Miss Squire 

and which Draft is hereinafter referred to as 'Hhe Amended Draft 
Deed No. 2 ^ the Court approved of the projxwed application by the 
said Edward Chester and James Flower of the sum of Seven Thousand 
Five Hundred Pounds New Consols part of the residuary estate of the 
said Testatrix for the establishment of Scholarships in Law at the 
University of Cambridge according to the terms of the Amended Draft 
Deed No. 2 and the scheme contained in the Schedule thereto. And it 
was ordered (amongst other things) that the said Edward Chester and 
James Flower should be at liberty to transfer the said sum of Seven 
Thousand Five Hundred Pounds New Consols to the University of 
Cambridge as mentioned in the Amended Draft Deed Number 2 and 
that the said Amended Draft Deed Number 2 should be engrossed in 
duplicate and that the several engrossments thereof should be identified 
by the signature of the Master attached to the Chambers of the Judge 
to whom the said action was a&signed on such engrossments respec- 
tively And that the said engrossments should be executed by the 
said Edward Chester and James Flower and by the University of 
TheCwirt Cambridge And by the same Order the Court declared that it was 
£1500 to be within the discretion of the said Edward Chester and James Flower 
Stw B<MiuL as Trustees of the Will of the said Testatrix to apply ~^ sum not 
exceeding One Thousand Five Hundred Pounds part of the Testatrix's 
residuar}*^ estate in the purchase of books wherewith to stock the Law 
Library at the Univeftiity of Cambridge authorised by the aforesaid 
Order of the Thirtieth day of July One thousand nine hundred And 
And other to appropriate or invest other part of the said residuary estate in order 
puichasesor that the income thereof might be applied under the control of the 
bcMksand University of Cambridge for or towards the purchase from time to 
u£|[J|^ time of necessary additions to or renewals of books in the said library 

and in or towards the payment of the salaiy of the librarian. 
The afore- And whereas the said Edward Chester and James Flower have in 

has been accordance with the terms of the said Order of the Twenty Fourth day 
t^aooouni? ^^ ^^^7 ^^^ thousand nine hundred and two transferred the said sum 
verSity! ®^ Seven Thousand Five Hundred Pounds New Consols into the 

corporate name of the University of Cambridge "Account B" 

The library And whereas the library the erection of which was authorised by 

finiflhed and the said Order of the Thirtieth day of July one thousand nine hundred 

Sn^fii cannot be completed for some time to come and it is not pro]>osed by 

rt^ed at ^^^q ^^ Edward Chester and James Flower to purchase books to stock 

the same or to appropriate and invest funds for providing for additions 

to or renewals of the books in the library and for or towards the salary 

of the Librarian as authorised by the said Order of the Twenty Fourth 

day of July one thousand nine hundred and two tmtil the building for 

the said library shall have been completed 

And whereas the presents have been engrossed from the aforesaid 
Amended Draft Deed Number 2 and are identified by the signature of 
Master Richard John Yilliers in the margin hereof 



Declaration of Trust 146 

Now this indenture witncsseth that in consideration of the premises Joint deci»- 
the said Edward Chester and James Flower as Trustees of the Will of Tnwteegand 
the said Testatrix Rebecca Flower Squire hereby direct and declare and ° ^* ^* 
the University of Cambridge hereby agree and declare as follows : 

1. The University of Cambridge shall and will hold the sum of H'u^^**^ 
Seven Thousand Five Hundred Pounds New Consols transferred into £7500«Ben- 
the name of the University of Cambridge as hereinbefore is mentioned Scholarships 
as the endowment for the Scholarships in Law at the University of ° ^' 
Cambridge hereinafter mentioned and for the purposes and subject to 

the provisions and regulations herein and in the Scheme set forth in 
the Schedule hereto expressed and contained concerning the same. 

2. The University of Cambridge may from time to time vary or investment 
transpose all or any part of the said sum of Seven Thousand Five varfedfrom 
Hundred Pounds New Consols or any stocks funds or securities for the time.*^ 
time being constituting or representing the endowment of the afore- 
said Scholarships into other stocks funds or securities for the time 

being permissible to Trustees for the investment of trust moneys. 

3. The University of Cambridge shall keep separate accounts of 5?® 5^^®'" 
the property and funds for the time being representing the endowment keepasepa- 
of the Scholarships in Law hereby established and such accounts may of this fund, 
be inspected at reasonable times and on due application by the said 
Edward Chester and James Flower or other the Trustees or Trustee for 

the time being of the Will of the said Testatrix and the University of 
Cambridge will from time to time ui>on the request in writing of the 
Tnistees or Trustee for the time being of the said Will supply to them 
or him such copies of or extracts from the said accounts respectively as 
they or he shall require. 

4. Any further property or funds whether in the nature of capital Any further 
or income arising from or representing the residuary estate of the said given sub- 
Testatrix which the said Edward Chester and James Flower or other SiSfb?^ 
the Trustees or Trustee for the time being of the Will of the said S?«mJ° 
Testatrix may hereafter in the exercise of the discretion reposed in *">**«• 
them by the said Will appropriate in extension or augmentation of the 
Scholarships in Law hereby established or of the endowment thereof or 

of the income of such endowment shall be made over to and vested in 
the University of Cambridge and shall be applied and dealt with upon 
the same trusts and shall be subject to the same powers provisions and 
regulations as the original endowment or (as the case may be) of the 
income of such original endowment. 



C. 10 



146 



Bemf action of Miss Squire 



Scheme for the management and regulation of the 
Squire Scholarships in Law at the University 
OF Cambridge, established by the foregoing 
Indenture and of the endowment thereof. 



Tobead- 
minifltered 
by Special 
Board for 
Law. 

Who may be 
BcholarB. 



Value of 
Bcholar- 
Bhipe. 



Name. 



Expenses to 
be defrayed 
out of the 
income of 
the capital 



Tenure. 



Temporary 
provisions. 



1. The endowment shall be administered and managed bj the 
Special Board for Law of the University of Cambridge. 

2. The net income of the endowment shall be applied in main- 
taining scholarships in Law herein referred to as Squire Scholarships 
for persons sons of British subjects domiciled in England at the birth 
of such persons and whose means or the means of whose respective 
parents or of the i)er8ons (if any) standing in loco parentis to them 
are not such as to enable them to bear with reasonable regard to other 
requirements and to other claims upon them the whole expense of the 
residence and education of such persons at a College or Hall in the 
University of Cambridge. Any such person who shall be already a 
member of the University of Cambridge shall be an undergraduate of 
not more than one year's standing on the First day of October after 
his election to a scholarship. 

3. The scholarships shall be of such annual amounts as the Board 
shall from time to time appoint but of not less than Fifty Pounds nor 
more than Eighty Pounds per annum each. One half (or as near as 
may be) of such scholarships shall be called ** Rebecca Flower Squire 
Scholarshi^Ms" and the other half shall be called ** James William Squire 
Scholarships." The whole of the net income for each year shall be 
allotted and applied to scholarships save only such a sum as the Board 
shall consider will probably be required for the oxi)ense8 of the adminis- 
tration of the endowment for that year including the expenses of and 
incidental to elections. If in any year the amount reserved for expenses 
shall prove insufficient the deficiency shall be made good by a ratable 
deduction from the subsisting scholarships. 

4. The Squire Scholarships shall provided the respective holders 
continue as long resident members of the University of Cambridge be 
tenable at any College or Hall of the University of Cambridge for three 
years in each case but with power to the Board to extend in any 
particular case the tenure thereof for a foiuiih or even a fifth year in 
cases where exceptional ability is shown provided the holder continues 
to be a resident member as aforesaid. 

The first elections to such scholarships respectively shall take place 
as follows namely to one scholarship or to such other number of the 
scholarships as the Board shall deem it desirable then to make an 
election within six calendar months next after the date of the foregoing 
Indenture and the scholar or scholars then elected shall hold his 



Scheme for her Scholarships 147 

scholarship or their scholarships as the case may be as from the First 
day of October one thousand nine hundred and two to such scholarship 
or such other number of the soholanships as the Board shall deem it 
desirable then to make a further election not later than the Tenth 
day of July one thousand nine hundred and three and as to the 
remainder (if any) of such Scholarships not later than the Tenth day 
of July one thousand nine hundred and four. 

Subsequently an election shall be held not later than the Tenth day of !}»*• of 
July m any year to fill up any existing vacancy and any vacancy which 
will or may arise on or before the First day of October in the same year 
whether by the expiration of the term of any then subsisting scholar- 
ship or otherwisa The tenure of the scholaj«hip to which any jwrson 
shall be elected at any such subsequent election shall commence on the 
First day of October next after his election. Notice of any vacancy or 
vacancies and of the election shall be published at a reasonable time 
before the election. 

5. Every scholarship shall be given as a reward of merit and schoiarahipe 
(subject to tiie preference hereinafter mentioned in favour of Founder's as reAS^of 
kin and of candidates bom in the Parish of Saint Mary Newington ™®^*" 
London) shall be awarded by the Board either on competition or by 
selection to the candidate whom the Board shall consider most deserving 

in point of moral character ability and learning. But the subject of 
any examination for testing the fitness of any candidate need not 
necessarily include Law. No person shall be elected to a scholarship Age. 
who has attained the age of twenty -one years or who will attain that 
age previously to the date at which his scholarship would commence 
and each candidate shall on applying for election declare in writing 
that he offers himself as a candidate with the sincere intention of 
qualifying himself for and being admitted to the practice of the Law 
as a Barrister or a Solicitor and of practising accordingly. 

6. At any election a candidate who as a descendant of John Squire Beneflto 
of Saint Neots in the County of Huntingdon who died in or about the foander'B 
month of January one thousand seven hundred and sixty or of his °' 
son James Squire who was bom at Saint Neots aforesaid in or about the 

year one thousand seven hundred and forty or of Matthew Flower of 
Saint Mary Newington in the County of London who died on or about 
the Twenty-ninth dtiy of July one thousand eight hundred and fifty- 
one is of kin to the Testatrix Rebecca Flower Squire or a candidate 
bom within the Parish of Saint Mary Newington shall be preferred the 
first preference being given to kindred. But such preference shall be 
subject to the candidate in question satisfying the Board that his 
standard of morals ability and learning is sufficiently high to render 
him worthy of election. Nevertheless no more than one scholarship 
at a time shall be held by virtue of kinship with the Testatrix and no 
more than one at a time by virtue of birth in the Parish of Saint Mary 
Newington. 

10—2 



148 



Benefaction of Miss Squire 



The Special 
iSoordto 
examine 
claims of 
candidates. 



Eutminen. 



Under what 
conditions 
a Squire 
Scholanhip 
ma7 be held 
with another 
SchoUr- 
ship. 



A Squire 
Scholar may 
not hold any 
office other 
than a 
Scholar- 
Bliip. 
Residenc& 



Election 

maybe 

deferred. 



Scholar mav 
be deprived 
for idleneeB 
or bad 
conduct. 



7. For every election the Board shall examine the claims of all 
persons seeking to become candidates. No person already a member 
of the University of Cambridge shall be received as a candidate without 
the consent of the Head or Vicegerent of his College or Hall or of the 
Censor of Non Collegiate Students and no person not already a member 
of the University of Cambridge shall be received without sufficient 
testimonials. 

8. Any examination to test the fitness of a candidate or candidates 
may be conducted by such examiners as the Board shall from time to 
time appoint but the Board need not appoint special examiners for 
this puri>ose alone if the service of examiners holding any other 
examination in the University of Cambridge can be made available. The 
examiners shall report to the Board the result of the examination. 

9. No person shall be elected to a Squire Scholarship who already 
holds a scholarship or scholarships or like benefit or benefits tenable 
at the University of Cambridge of the annual value of One Hundred 
and Thirty Pounds or upwards. Any person who after election to a 
Squire Scholarship obtains during the term of such scholarship any 
other scholarship or like benefit tenable at the University of Cambridge 
shall not be entitled to receive any payment in respect of his Squire 
Scholarship if and while the income of his subsequently obtained 
scholarship or scholarships benefit or benefits together with that of 
such (if any) «as he held at the date of his election to the Squire 
Scholarship amounts to or exceeds One Hundred and Thirty Pounds 
per annum and if the same though of less amount than One Hundred 
and Thirty Pounds per annum would by the addition of the Squire 
Scholarship in full be made to exceed that amount then only so much 
shall be paid in respect of the Squire Scholarship as will bring up the 
income for the time being of the other scholarship or scholarships or 
benefit or benefits to One Hundred and Thirty Pounds per annum. 

10. No holder of a Squire Scholarship shall at the same time hold 
any office employment or position in or for the University of Cambridge 
other than that of a student or a scholar. 

11. If a person not a member of the University of Cambridge 
shall be elected to a Squire Scholarship and his residence shall be 
deferred for more than one term after the commencement of his tenure 
of the scholarship he shall only have the profits of his scholarship from 
the date of the commencement of his residence. 

12. If in any year the Board shall consider that there is no 
candidate worthy of election the election shall be deferred till the 
following year. 

13. The Board shall have power to deprive any scholar of his 
scholarship or of any part of the emoluments thereof on account of 
misconduct or idleness or on account of the scholar ceasing to maintain 
a reasonable standard of proficiency or ceasing to pursue his education 
in law and for this purpose the Board may act on the report of the 



Scheme for her Scholarahips 149 

authoritieB of the College or place of education of the scholar or upon 
such other evidence as the Board shall deem reasonable and the decision 
of the Board shall be final 

14. The expenses of and incidental to the elections to the Squire ?f pJih" ^ 
Scholarships including if the Board shall think fit a honorarium to the of tbeiii- 
examiners (if any) in any case in which they are specially appointed or endowment 
are put to additional trouble by reason of examining for the scholar- 
ships shall be paid out of the income of the endowment. 

15. Moneys arising from vacancies or mulcts or from any sus- Moneys 
pension or deduction hereby directed or from reservation for expenses added to the 
beyond what shall be actuaJly expended shall be invested in the name ^^ 

of the University of Cambridge as an addition to the capital of the 
endowment and such additions and the income thereof shall be subject 
to the same incidents provisions and regulations as the original endow- 
ment and the income thereof. 

16. The Board may from time to time delegate either during their Board may 
pleasure or for a stated period and either generally or for some specific theirpowen 
purpose all or any of their functions or powers under this scheme to a ^uml"' 
Committee consisting of three or more members of the Senate of the 
University of Cambridge who need not necessarily all be members of 

the Board and any question arising before such Committee shall be 
decided by the votes of a majority of those present and in case of 
equality the senior member of the Committee present shall have a 
casting vote. 

17. Those regulations may be altered from time to time by the ^jj^^^^ 
Senate of the University of Cambridge but no such alteration shall 

vary or afiect the conditions hereinbefore laid down with regard to : 

(1) The parentage of persons eligible for Scholarships and 
their need of assistance to obtain a University education. 

(2) The limit of age at election. 

(3) The preference hereby given in favor of Founder's Idu and 
of natives of Saint Mary Newington. 

(4) The limits of the amount of any Scholarship. 

(5) The limitation to One Hundred and Thirty Pounds per 
annum of the total amount receivable in resi)ect of a Squire 
Scholarship and of any other scholarship or like benefit and the 
prohibition against holding with a Squire Scholarship any office 
employment or position in the University of Cambridge other 
than that of a student or a scholar. 

(6) The requirement of the declaration mentioned in Clause 5 
and 

(7) Necessity for continued residence at some College or Hall. 



160 Benefuction of Miss Squire 

In witness whereof the said parties hereto of the one part have 
hereunto set their hands and seals and the University of Cambridge 
have hereunto caused their Common Seal to be hereunto affixed the 
day and year first above written ^ 

EDWAlRD CHESTER 
JAMES FLOWER 



1 From the original in the Registry of the University, Box G. 31. The 
Graoe to affix the Seal to this doooment passed the Senate 23 October, 1901. 



IV. 
PROFESSORSHIPS 



The five Regius Professorships 158 



1. Divinity, Greek, Hebrew, Law, Physic (Regius). 

1540. 

These five Professorships are commonly stated to have 
been founded by King Henry the Eighth in 1540, but no 
deed of foundation appears to be in existence. The single 
piece of direct evidence available for this date is that aflforded 
by the letters patent dated 9 November, 1540, appointing 
Thomas Wakefield, M.A., Reader in Hebrew with a salary 
of £40 a year to be paid out of the revenues of the suppressed 
Abbey of Westminster (A). 

There is indirect evidence that the other four Readerships 
were filled up in 1540 or soon afterwards ^ 

In the statutes which Queen Mary gave to Trinity 
College it was provided that the stipends of the Readers 
in Divinity, Greek, and Hebrew, should be paid by that 
College; and minute directions were added respecting the 
mode of election, status of the Readers, etc. (B). This 
statute, with a few unimportant alterations, forms the forty- 
first chapter of the statutes given by Queen Elizabeth to 
the same College, 1559-60^ 

This statute shews that so early as the reign of Queen 
Mary the election of the Regius Professors of Divinity, 
Hebrew, and Greek was entrusted as at present to a body 
of electors resident in the University, the salaries of the 
Professors being paid by Trinity College. The Regius 

^ Letters of Roger Ascham^ Vol. i. (ed. Giles) p. 25. The letter may be 
dated May or Jane, 1542, from what is said in it of Bp. Gardiner's letter on 
the pronnnciation of Greek, dated 15 May, 1542. The writer says: **De 
Cantabrigia si quid aves andire, en jam bene nova tibi videri potest : tam 
divinis et immortalibns literarum prffisidiis et ornamentls aaxit eam optimi 
prindpis nostri munificentia. Wigginus [Wiganns] Theologian Smithas 
JwritprudentUBj Checus Lingtus Grecie, Wakfeldus Hebraica, Blitas, qui 
sororem domini Checi duxit, Medieitue^ publici professores sunt institati. 
Salarium qaadraginta libraram singuli qnotannis sunt acoepturi." 

> Cofnm. DocU, iii. 428. 



154 The Jive Regius Professorships 

Professors of Law and Medicine on the contraiy were always 
on a different footing. The Crown has made and still makes 
the appointment, and the ancient stipend (now considerably 
reduced) is still paid by the Crown to the University. 

Arms were granted to the five Regius Professors in 1690\ 

In 1606 (26 August) King James the First annexed the 
rectory of Somersham to the Regius Professorship of Divinity*; 
and in 1661 King Charles the Second gave to the Professors 
of Hebrew and Greek the privilege of continuing to hold 
their fellowships in connection with their Professorships (C). 

By Act of Parliament, 3 and 4 Victoria, c. 113, leave 
was given to the University to sell, if they thought proper, 
the advowsons of the benefices annexed to the Regius 
Professorship of Divinity (D). 

A scheme for annexing canonries in the Cathedral Church 
of Ely to the Regius Professorships of Hebrew and Greek 
was prepared by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners 13 July, 
1848, and received the assent of the Queen in Council 
11 August, 1848 (E). 

In 1860 (29 March) the Commissioners framed a new 
statute for the Regius Professorships of Divinity, Hebrew, 
and Greek. This statute was confirmed by the Queen in 
Council, 10 May, I860*. 

By Will dated 25 March, 1871, George Jeremy of Ijee 
Combe House, Axminster, Devon; and of Lincoln's Inn, 
Barrister at Law ; formerly of Trinity College (A.B. 1818, 
AM. 1821) bequeathed to the University £1000 in aug- 
mentation of the income of the Regius Professor of Divinity 
(F). Mr Jeremy died 31 December, 1874; and the sum 
bequeathed (less legacy duty) was paid to the University in 
1878^ 

^ The grant is printed above, p. 38. 

' The letters patent are printed above, p. 38. 

' Statutes, ed. 1896, p. 83. A statute framed by the Council of the 
Senate and published by them 26 October, 1857, though approved by Trinity 
College under its common seal, was rejected by the Senate 26 November, 
1857. For the stipends of the Hegius Professors of Greek, Law, and Physic, 
see Statute B, chapter vi 

* The Vice-Chanoellor was authorised to give a reoeipt for the legacy and 
dividends by Grace 21 March, 1878. 



Professorships of Greek and Divinity 155 

The Universities Act, 1877, contains the following pro- 
vision for the severance of the canonry in the Cathedral 
Church of Ely from the Regius Professorship of Greek : 

26. The Commissioners, in a statute or statutes made by them for 
the University of Cambridge, with the concurrence of the Ecclesiastical 
Commissioners for England, may provide for the canonry in the chapter 
of the Cathedral Church of Ely, which is annexed and united to the 
Regius Professorship of Greek, being, on a vacancy, severed therefrom, 
and being thenceforth |)ermanently annexed and united to a professor- 
ship in the University of a theological or ecclesiastical character, with 
power, nevertheless, for the Commissioners, with the concurrence of the 
Ecclesiastical Commissioners, if they think it expedient, to allow the 
present professor to resign the professorship and to hold the canonry as 
if it had never been annexed to the professorship 

and, 11 May, 1878, the Master of Trinity College forwarded 
to the Vice-Chancellor the following Resolution : 

That the Vice-Chancellor be informed that if the University dasire 
that the Canonry of Ely now attached to the Kegius Professorship of 
Greek be separated from the Professorship, the College is prepared to 
recommend to the Commissioners that the Professorship be endowed 
with a Fellowship of the College, and with the sum of £500 a year from 
the revenues of the College, in addition to his statutable payment of 
£40 a year. 

This resolution was embodied by the Council of the 
Senate in a Report dated 10 June, 1878, confirmed by 
Grace 5 December, 1878^; but the separation was not 
eflfected until 1882, when (10 March) the statute now in 
force received the royal assent*. 

The Rectory of Somersham was disannexed from the Regius 
Professorship of Divinity by an Act of Parliament which 
received the royal assent 18 August, 1882. The income 
of the rectory is to be divided between the vicar and the 
Professor*. 

* Comb, Univ. Reporter, 1878, pp. 88, 245. 

> Statutes, ed. 1896, p. 63. 

» See above, p. 50. The draft of the Bill on which this Act was based 
was approved by Grace 4 May, 1882. It was prepared in accordance with a 
Beport of the Council of the Senate, dated 13 Febmary, 1882, confirmed by 
Grace 9 March, 1882. {Reporter, pp. 303, 388, 514, 531.) 



156 The five Regius Professorships 



A. Letters patent of King Henry the Eighth, 1540. 

Rex, [etc.]. 
Sciatis quod Nos de gratia nostra special! ac ex certa scientia et 
mero motu nostris dedimus et conoessimus, ac per presentes damus et 
concedimus dilecto subdito nostro Thome Wakefeld, A.M. officium 
sive locum Lectoris nostri in Hebraica Ldngua iam noviter a Nobis 
fundatum et erectum in vsum et profectum iuventutis nostre Anglicaue 
in alma Academia nostra Cantabrigie, ac ipsum Thomam Lectorem 
seu informatorem Lingue predicte facimus ordinamus et constituimus 
per presentes. 

Habendum, exercendum, et occupandum officium predictum prefato 
Thome a festo Nativitatis Sancti lohannis Baptiste vltimo preterite, 
pro tempore vite sue, per se, vel per sufficientem deputatum suum ; 
percipiendo inde annuatim pro feodo et stipendio suo quadragiuta 
libras sterlingorum, solvendas sibi ad festa Nativitatis Domini et 
Nativitatis Sancti lohannis Baptiste, per equales portiones, per manus 
particularium receptonim reddituum et reventionum Collegii seu 
Ecclesie Cathedralis nostre, sive nuper Monasterii, de Westmonasterio 
pro tempore existencium. £o quod expressa mentio [etc.]. In cujus 
[etc.]. Teste Rege apud Westmonasterium nono die Novembris, 1540. 
Per ipsum Begem ^ 



B. The forty-first Chapter of the Statutes given to 
Trinity College by Philip and Mary, 

De officio trium Lectorum puhlicorumy qui in Scholia Academie prelegunt, 

quorum unus Theologiamy alter linguam Hehraicam^ tertius Grecam 

docet. Ca. 41. 

^jjl^i^®' Quo quis ampliore mercede et stipendio donatus est, eo majorem 

^^Jjy®**'- laborem libenti animo capere debet; et propterea statuimus et ordi- 

4 lectures nsuuus, ut tres public! Lectores (quorum singuli quadraginta libras a 

daring Collegio Sancte et Individue Trinitatis a Bege Henrico Octavo, Patre 

nostro charissimo, fundato in singulos annos recipiunt) unaquaque 

hebdomada cuiusque termini in qua nullus festus dies occiurerit, 

quinquies^ singuli minimum legant, et auditores semper antea de eo 

die quo legere volimt admoneant Quod si vnus festus dies aut plures 

extra diem domiuicum in aliquam hebdomadam alicuius termini 

incident turn reliquis diebus omnibus qui sunt profesti eos legere 

volumus. Festos dies hoc loco inteUigimus qui sunt communiter 

^ Bymer, Fccdera, xiv. p. 705. 

a For '*in qaa...quinquieB/' the statute of Elizabeth reads *' qoater." 



term. 



Statute of Philip ami Mary 167 

observati et non sanctorum vigilie aut dies intercisi^. Insuper toto And in Long 
magne vacationis termino, si pestis non ingruerit, et tria ex precipuis 
Collegiis suam iuventutem non rus amandarint, eos quoque legere 
precipimiis : precipua Collegia hoc loco intelligimus, Collegium Regis, 
Collegium Sancte et Individue Trinitatis, Collegium Divi Johannis, et 
Collegium Christi. Et quoties singuli, vel eo termino vel reliquis PSSJf*'"®* 
tribus terminis, diebus prestitutis legendi officium pretermiserint, toties 
decem solidis mulctentur, qui dempti de ipsorum stipendiis in Collegii 
vsum cedant. 

Quod si quispiam eorum egrotaverit, aut aliqua gravi causa aut y**®J* 
negotio per Magistrum Collegii et maiorem partem octo Seniorum be allowed, 
approbando impeditus fuerit, turn intra triduum ad summum pro se 
unum qui sit ad illud munus obeundum idoneus substituat, ut audi- 
torum utilitati diligenter cousulatur; verum aliis de causis nunquani 
pro se quempiam substituere sub pena loci sui amittendi permittimus. 

Horas autem a Yicecancellario et Magistro dicti Collegii cum 
quatuor ex octo Senioribus prestitutas obeervent. Singulisque diebus Lecture to 
quibuB legere tenentur, singuli integram fere boram prelegendo con- hour, 
sumant ; quinetiam et auctores a predictis Yicecancellario Magistro et 
quatuor ex octo senioribus dicti Collegii designates legant, et modum 
legendi quoque quern illi vtilissimum commodissimumque duxerint 
perpetuo teneant. 

Porro statuimus et volumus, vt quotiescunque locum alicuius pre- Mode of 
dictorum Lectorum yacare contigerit, plenam eligendi potestatem who are to 
habeant Vicecancellarius Academie Cantabrigiensis, Magister Collegii ^^^^ 
predict! cum duobus maxime senioribus sociis eiusdem Collegii, quin- 
etiam Prepositi seu Magistri trium reliquorum precipuorum CoUegi- 
orum, id est, Collegii Regalis, Collegii Divi Johannis, et Collegii Christi, 
et si quispiam predictorum Electorum Vicecancellarius id temporis 
fuerit, tum sumatur eius loco Magister Collegii Regine : qui omnes in Eight days' 
publicis Scholia in vnum per Vioecancellarium cum consensu Magistri for eu^i- ^ 
Collegii Sancte et Individue Trinitatis predicti convocati, breve quod- ^ndidates 
dam scriptum seu instrumentum per scribam Academie, postridie quam ^ ^ ^^®°' 
locum vacare intellexerint, componendum curent, inque eo diem ad 
singulos eorum qui mimus illud petunt diligenter examinandos pre- 
stituant Huius script! seu instrument! sint-duo exemplaria descripta; 
quorum alterum ad ostium tempi! Dive Marie prope forum siti, 
alterum ad ostium publicarum Scholarum affigatur, ibiquo vtrumque 
ad septem dies integros stet, quo ab omnibus totius Academie pre- 
dicte studentibus intelligi possit eiusmod! locum vacare. Sit autem 
dies examinationis octavus dies postquam Yicecancellario et Magistro 
Collegii Sancte et Individue Trinitatis a Rege Henrico Octavo, Patre 
nostro charissimo, fundati locum vacare notum fuerit 

^ For '*Qaod sLJoteroisi," the same statute reads ''Gupimus tamen 
ut Bis(^U8 profestis diebus levant/' 



158 The five Regius Professorships 

Anon- Quod 81 quispiam eorum qui tunc abfuerint ab Academia, iudicio 

candidate maioiis partis Electonim, etiaiuBi non petat, dignissimuH loco vacante 

forandtfme videbitur, dies exatninationis iu eo casu tantum vsque eo poterit 

lu^tion ^- differri, quoad commode, respectu ad loci distantiam habito, vbicunque 

tended. fuerit accersiri queat. Et si extra regnum Anglie fuerit, interea 

one who is aliquis ad locum supplendum per maiorem partem dictorum Electorum 

outofEng- ^ . . X ^. X. J- vTV * 

land a de- surrogetur, et pro rata portione stipendmm habeat. 

apiwintSl. Sit autem ezaminandi modus eiusmodi. Si lectura Theologica 

How the vacaverit, tum Theologorum singuli qui illud munus petunt, quos vel 

is to be Doctores Theologie, vel Baccalaureos eiusdem facultatis semper esse 

ForDi- volumus, primum per facultatem Theologicam examinentur, quid in 

vinity. Scripturis Sacris intelligendis et in Sanctorum Patrum scriptis possint 

Deinde singuli eorum qui petunt, diebus per Electores ad eam rem 

prestitutis, aliquam Scripture partem per predictos Electores sibi 

assignatam per spatium unius bore in Scholis publicis palam inter- 

pretentur. 

and G ^'Tf^ Quod si lectura Hebraica vel Qreca vacaverit, singuli qui petunt in 

linguarum illarum oognitione similiter per aliquot earum linguarum 

peritos examinentur, et certis diebus partem alicuius libri aut auctoris 

in illis Unguis scripti per dictos Electores aasignatam per spatium unius 

bore, vt supra de lectura Theologica dictum est, in Scholis publicis 

palam interpretentur. 

2ien*b *«i Postridie autem quam singuli hoc modo palam prelegerint, predicti 

Electors. Electores publicis in Scholis in vnum convenientes iureiurando se 

obstringant, in locum ilium iam vacantem se neminem, vel gratia, vel 

munere, vel spe alicuius muneris commotos, sed eum quem conscientia 

testante maxime ad illud munus idoneum iudicaverint electuros, 

semota omni sinistra animi affectione, prout sunt et Jesu Seruatori 

rationem in vltimo die redditiui, et Academic honori et utilitati 

studentium consultiui. 

No notice to Atque si forte contigerit vel Nos, vel quempiam ex Successoribus 

RoTfti nostris aut Magnatibus huius Regni aliquem per literas ad eiusmodi 

otherain locum commendare qui non sit ad eum maxime idoneus, (optimum 

iMhrticuStr enim semper Deo teste et conscientia preiiciendum cupimus,) turn 

peraona. yolumus et mandamus, vt Electores sine vUo dictarum literarum 

respectu prestantissimum^et ad Auditores instruendos acoommodatis- 

simum eligant. 

an abeen?' Quod si quispiam eorum penes quos eligendi potestas sit forte 

elector. abfucrit, eius locum suppleat illius Vicarius, eandemque auctoritatem 

inter eligendum habeat. 
whatqnaii- Qui omnes inter eligendum potissimum oonsiderent solidam doc- 
didate are to trinam, vocis claritatem, pronuntiationem distinctam, et elocutionem. 
intoacoount Et socios CoUegil Sancte et Individue Trinitatis predicti, si modo 
Trin°wtobe ^^^ ^^ petuut pares sint, semper preferant. Et in quem major 
preferred. j)ani Electorum consenserit, is pro electo habeatur. Quod si Electores 
post tria aperta scrutinia hoc modo consentire non possint^ tum is 



Statute of Philip and Mary 169 

electus esto quern Vicecancellarius et Magister dicti Collegii soli How votes 

nominaverint. Et si forte id temporis Magister dicti Coll^ii sit given. 

Vicecancellarius, turn is sit electus, quern ille et Prepositus Collegii 

R^alis nominaverint. At si hi duo, id est, Vicecancellarius et 

Magister dicti Collegii, vel si dictus Magister Vicecancellarius sit, 

turn nisi dictus Magister et Prepositus Collegii Regalis nou de vno 

aliquo consenserint, is turn pro electo habeatiur quern illius Academie 

Cancellarius (si Episcopus sit) solus nomiuaverit ; verum si Cancellarius 

Academie illius non sit Episcopus, turn quem Archiepiscopus Cantuari- 

ensis solus nominaverit electus esto. 

Quem sic electum predicti Electores cum Uteris ad nos, vel ad Election 
^ * ^ mustbeoon- 

successores nostros Reges Anglie mittant, vt nostra vel successorum firmed by 

noatrorum auctoritate confirmetur electio. 

Qua re confecta, vt primum electus ille redierit ad Academiam^, per A^oJif^^" 
Magistrum dicti Collegii Sancte et Individue Trinitatis, simul atque 
iusiurandum coram dicto Magistro et octo Senioribus eiusdem Collegii 
de hoc statuto servando dederit, admittatur. 

Nemo in locum aliquem predictorum Lectorum vnquam eligatur Readers 
qui sit de heresi probabiliter suspectus, vel iufamia notatus, vel qui goodcha- 
vxorem duxerit'. Qui ad Lecturam Hebraicam eligetur, sit minimum Cmifarried. 
vel Magister Artium, vel Baccalaureus Theologie, vel Doctor eiusdem of what 
facultatis ; qui autem ad Grecam lecturam assumetur, sit ad minimum 
vel Magister Artium, vel Baccalaureus Theologie. Doctores omnes, 
cuiuscunquo facultatis fuerint, ab hac Greca lectura omnino ex- 
cludimus. 

Quod si socius Collegii Sancte et Individue Trinitatis predicti ad Position of 
aliquem locum predictorum Lectorum electus sit, cum primum ad- of Trinity 
missus fuerit, deinceps socii nomen solum teneat, et si vnus sit ex eiec^' 
numero octo seniorum, senioritatem illam quoque cubiculum suum cSt 
aisatorem habeat : commeatu vero stipendio et liberatura socio debitis, 
toto illo tempore, quo illud legendi munus obit penitus careat. Cete- 
rum si l^endi munus deposuerit, turn sodalitium vt antea, cum omni- 
bus commoditatibus habeat. 

Inauper statuimus, vt singuli ad aliquod predictorum Lectorum Readers to 
munus electi, caiuscunque Collegii socii aut pensionarii fuerint', aut Trinity 
vbicunque antea habitaverint, cum primum admissi fuerint, in dicto ** ^^' 
Collegio Sancte et Individue Trinitatis (prout Fundatoria voluntas 
postulat) quamdiu mimus illud exequuntur habitent, et statutis eius- 
dem Collegii eodem modo quo socii eiusdem pareant; et omnea actua Their status 
acholasticoa ad quos socii tenentur obaervent, ceteraque omnia ut aocii 

^ In the statute of Elizabeth the words "Quem sio eleotum...Aoad6miam" 
are replaced by " Qua re coufecta, electus ille." 

- The words " vel...dnxerit" are omitted in the statute of Elizabeth. 

> The statute of Elizabeth inserts after '< fuerint" "exoeptis semper 
CoUegiorum Magistris Poctoribus et maritis." 



160 The five Regius Professorships 



To pay £6 
annually for 
(Commons. 

Allowance 
when UL 



Punishment 
for n^lect 
of duty, 
criminality, 
heresy, or 
dis- 
obedience. 



CoUegii agant, sed nihil preter stipendium Lectori debitum a dicto 
Collegio recipiant. Et si quispiam illorum sociuB vel pensionariuB 
alterius alicuius CoUegii antea fuerit, nunquam vel in socium vel in 
nutnerum octo seniorum eiusdem CoUegii, quamdiu illud munus 
tenuerit, eligatur. Verum si munus illud vel sua sponte deposuerit, 
aut pre morbo aut imbecillitate virium exequi non possit, in socium 
CoUegii predicti, ne omni ope destituatur, per Magistrum et maiorem 
partem octo seniorum dicti CoUegii, si modo statuta CoUegii in quo 
antea socius fiierat permiserint, eum eligi volumus, quocunque dicti 
CoUegii Sancte et Individue Trinitatis statuto non obstante. Quod si 
statuta CoU^i in quo socius fuerat non permiserint, turn in dicto 
Collegio Sancte et Individue Trinitatis non in socium eligatur aut 
admittatur, sed tamen commeatum, stipendium, et liberaturam, 
ceteraque commoda habeat socio dicti CoUegii qui sit eiusdem gradus 
debita, ea lege ut statuta dicti CoUegii ad socium eiusdem gradus 
pertinentia per omnia obseruet. Atque toto illo tempore quo his com- 
modis in dicto Collegio fruitur, sodaUtium quod in dicto CoUegio vel 
tunc vacat, vel proxime post vacabit, ne dictum CoU^um quicquam 
damni inde accipiat, omnino vacare volumus et mandamus. Item 
singuli ad aliquod predictorum Loctorum munus electi, tam socii dicti 
CoUegii quam ceteri, pro commeatu ex stipendio sibi pro lectura debito 
sex libras quotannis dicto CoUegio solvant, hoc est, ad finem cuiusque 
anni quarte triginta solidos. Quod si aUquando egrotaverint, tum 
volumus vt pro singulis hebdomadis quibus egrotaverint viginti dena- 
rios ex predictis sex libris demptos habeant ; cubiculum vero in CoUegio 
gratis habeant 

Singuli eorum suum legendi munus, quamdiu et iUud diUgenter 
obierint, et ipsi voluennt, teneant. Verum si quispiam eorum suum 
officium negUgenter fecerit, et ter per Vicecancellarium et Magistrum 
dicti CoUegii de ea re admonitus non emendaverit ; aut si de heresi, aut 
de aliquo crimine notabili, coram Vicecancellario et dicto Magistro 
legitime convictus fiierit, aut si contra (idem orthodoxam; sanctorum 
patrum, aut generalium conciliorum decreta, testimonia, vol auctori- 
tates aut contra sacramenta ritus aut oeremonias ecclesie catholice 
aliquando vel locutus esse vel aliquid egisse deprehensus sit; aut si 
uxorem duxerit, aut si in predicto coUegio habitare recusaverit, aut ab 
eo discesserit, aut ab Academia ampUus quadraginta dies in annos 
singuloB abfuerit, nisi gravissima causa per Magistrum dicti CoUegii et 
majorem partem octo seniorum eiusdem approbanda obstiterit^ aut si 
quando apud nos aut successores nostros pro Uteris patentibus, quo 
locum suum durante vita habeat, agere vel egisse comperiatur, loco suo 
omnino privetur^, quocunque scripto, auctoritate, aut mandato conoesso, 

^ Instead of the words *<aat si quando... privetnr" the atatotes of 
EUzabeth, as printed, read "turn idem sunm locum amittat"; bat this 
clause is not in the MS. to which the Qreat Seal is attached. 



Letters of King Charles the Second 161 

vel in posterum concedendo, vel quacunque dispensatione a quocunque 
obtenta non obstante. 

Nemo predictorum Lectorum durante tempore lecture sue vUum Readers to 
officium, magistratum, aut lecturam aliam, vel in dicto CoUegio, vel in oiher^offloe. 
Academia habeat sub pena predicta. 

Hujus Statuti vnum exemplar sit inter Statuta dicti CoUegii et 
alterum in libro de Statutis Academie descriptum^ 

C. Letters patent of King Charles the Second, 1661. 

Carolus Secundus, [etc] 

Dilecto nobis in Christo Henrico Feme S. Theologiae Professori, 
Academiae Cantabr* Procancellario pro tempore existenti et Coll^i 
nostri Sanctae et Individuae Trinitatis in eadem Universitate Magistro, 
necnon reliquis trium Lectorum publicorum ex Fundatione Regis 
Henrici Octavi Electoribas ; omnibus etiam aliis ad quos infra scripta 
ullo modo spectare poterint, salutem. 

Cum inter statuta dicti Collegii et in libro de statutis Academiae The statu- 
certum quoddara statutura sub hoc titulo habeatur viz. : " De officio ^JSS^ 
trium Lectorum publicorum*' quorum unus Tbeologiam, alter linguam pSrelSor-*** 
Hebraicam, tertius Graecam docet, in quo statuto inter caetera hae jJtadiedto 
clausulae seu sententiae hisce verbis subsequentibus continentur, viz. ^^^^^ 
'* Quod si socius Sanctae et Individuae Trinitatis Collegii praedicti ad 
aliquem locum praedictorum Lectorum electus sit, quamprimum ad- 
missus fuerit, deinceps socii nomen solum teneat,'' et paucis interjectis 
haec insuper : " Statuimus ut singuli ad aliquod praedictorum Lectorum 
munus electi cujuscunque Collegii Socii aut Pensionarii fuerint, aut 
ubicunque babitaverint, quamprimum admissi fiierint, in dicto Collegio 
Sanctae et Individuae Trinitatis quamdiu munus illud exequentur, 
habitent." Porro de stipendio tribus hisce Praelectoribus assignato et 
de labore seu penso iis injuncto idem statutum statim ab initio haec 
habet: *' Statuimus ut tres publici Lectores quorum singuli quadra- 
ginta librae a Collegio Sanctae et Individuae Trinitatis a Rege Henrico 
Octavo fundato in singulos annos recipiant, unaquaque hebdomada 
cujuscmique termini quater singuli ad minimum legant, insuper toto 
magnae vacationis termino, si pestis non ingruerit et tria ex praecipuis 
CoUegiis in Academia juventutem non rus amandaverint, eos quoque 
legere praecipimus et quoties singuli vel ex termino vel reliquis termi- 
nis diebus praestitutis legendi officium praetermiserint, toties decem 
solidis mulctentur, qui dempti de ipsorum stipendiis in Coll^i usum 
cedant." Jam vero ex diversorum et fide dignorum, quibus dicti 
Collegii et Academiae status satis perspectus et lectionum in scholis 
habendarum ratio probe cognita est, relatione aocepimus dictum 

^ From the copy of the statutes given by Philip and Mary to Trinity 
College. These statutes are not dated, and they never passed the Qreat 
Seal. 

C. 11 



A Fellow 
of Trinity 
College iB 
not to vacate 
hlB FeUow- 
shipif 
elected 
Regius Pro- 
feeaorof 
Greek or 
Hebrew. 



Barrow, 
DOW Greek 
Profeaaor, 
may con- 
tinue 
Fellow. 
A FeUow 
of another 
College need 
not migrate 
toTrinltf. 



Lectureato 
be given 
twice a week 
during three 
terms. 



The case of 
eodeeiasti- 
cal prefer- 
ment. 



162 The five Regius Professorships 

stipendium amplum licet et magnificum in prima fiindatione quam sit 
exile prout nunc dierum fert uummorum aestimatio, labor vero quam 
sit gravis et on\is vix ferendum prout nunc obtinet legendi modus in 
scholis usitatus: Nos igitur hominum Academicorum, praesertim pub- 
licorum in Academia Professorum, commodis prospicere cupientes ex 
suprema nostra r^a potestate, certa scientia et mero motu, dictas 
clausulas seu sententias superius a nobis reoensitas annullamus et 
cassamus in quantum concemunt praescriptum ilium numerum lectio- 
num et sodalitii amissionem; et quo aequior sit inter mercedem et 
laborem proportio, statuimus quod socius dicti nostri Collegii si electus 
sit in Lectorem Linguae Hebraicae vel Graecae (nam Theologiae 
Professorem excipimus propter annexum satis opimum Saoerdotium) 
non tenebitur ex hoc tempore sodalitium suum deponere, sed eo 
gaudebit cum omnibus suis emolumentis ; et nominatim Isaaco Barrow 
Linguae Graecae Lectori publico jam constituto lioebit socii locum 
tenere eoque cum omnibus suis privilegiis et emolumentis gaudere et 
frui. Quod si alius cujuscunque Collegii socius electus fuerit, non 
tenebitur in dicto nostro Collegio Sanctae et Individuae Triuitatis 
habitare modo per statuta sui Goll^i possit et a Praefecto atque sociis 
ejusdem Collegii ei permissum fuerit retinere suum sodalitiiun ejusque 
emolumenta una cum Lectura ilia publica ad quam ascitus est. 

Laborem vero quod attinet et pensum trium praedictorum Lecto- 
rum, statuimus ut bis tantum in unaquaque hebdomada idque solum 
inter trium terminorum spatia legere teneantur; Diebus vero praesti- 
tutis si officium legendi praetemiiserint decem solidis toties quoties 
mulctentur, ut supra dictum est Denique statuimus ut praedicti 
Lectores quibus nostra hac indulgentia permissum est sodalitium una 
cum Lectura retinere, si promotionem ecclesiasticam, puta Prae* 
bendam vel aliam quamvis sine cura animarum (nam Sacerdotium, 
Decanatum et Archidiaconatum excipimus) obtinuerint, non teneantur 
in eo casu sodalitium amittere quocunque Collegii statute non obstante. 
Reliquaautem omnia et singula qliae in dicto statute '^De Officio trium 
Lectorum Publicorum" continentur, pristinum suum robur et firmi- 
tatem volumus habere. 

In cujus rei testimonium has literas nostras fieri fecimus patentes. 
Teste me ipso apud Westmonasterium octavo die Aprilis anno Regni 
nostri tertio decimo. 

Per ipsum Regem. 

HASTINGS^ 



Benefices 
annexed to 
Regius Pro- 
fessorship of 
Divinity 
may be sold. 



D. Act of Parliament 3 and 4 Vict. c. 113. 

Sect 70. And be it enacted that, so soon as conveniently may be, 
and by the like authority, arrangements may be made to enable the 
University of Cambridge, if they shall so think fit, to sell the advowsons 



> The original is in the Muniment Boom of Trinity College, 
printed in Comm, DoeU, iii. 469. 



It is 



Caruyiiries in Ely Cathedral 163 

of the bene&oes annexed to the Regius Professorship of Divinity in the 

said University or any of them, and to invest the proceeds of any such 

sale in proper securities, with a provision for the payment of the interest 

and annual profits thereof to the Regius Professor of Divinity for the time Annual 

being ; and that upon the completion of the sale of any such advowson mid to the 

the existing incumbent of the benefice shall be at liberty, upon resigning ^ *^"^'' 

the same, to receive such interest and annual profits^. 

E. Scheme of Ecclestastioal Commissioners. 

At the Court at Osbome House, Isle of Wight, the 11th day 
of August 1848: Present The Queen's Most Excellent 
Majesty in Council. 

Whereas the Ecclesiastical Commissioners for England in pursuance Scheme pre- 
of an Act passed in the Session of Parliament held in the 3rd and 4th KcL Comm. 
years of Her Majesty's reign intituled "An Act to carry into effect ofScrS"** 
with certain modifications the fourth Report of the Commissioners of vict ^ * * 
Ecclesiastical Duties and Revenues" have duly prepared and laid 
before Her Majesty in Council a Scheme bearing date the 13th day of 
Jidy 1848 in the words following: 

We the Ecclesiastical Commissioners for England in pursuance of Si°^ b? *^ 
an Act passed in the Session of Parliament held in the third and foiuth uinezed to 
years of yoiur Majesty's reign intituled " An Act to carry into efiect feBBorahipe 
certain modifications in the fourth Report of the Commissioners of Sid^Greek. 
Ecclesiastical Duties and Revenues" have prepared and now humbly »»™«*y' 
lay before your Majesty in Council the following scheme for annexing 
canonries in the Cathedral Church of Ely to the Regius Professorships 
of Hebrew and Greek respectively in the University of Cambridge. 

Whereas it was by the said Act enacted that the two Canonries in the two 
the Chapter of the Cathedral Church of Ely which should be secondly ShicS " 
and thirdly vacant should be permanently annexed and united to the grandly 
Regius Professorships of Hebrew and Qreek respectively in the Uni- JJ^^*"**^ 
versity of Cambridge ; 

And whereas the Canonry in the said Cathedral Church of Ely Theflntof 
lately held by the Reverend George Leonard Jenyns deceased is now canonries \» 
vacant and is the Canonry so secondly vacant and the Canonry which JSe next to 
shall next be vacant in the same Church will be the Canonry so thirdly ^,T^|t** 
vacant within the meaning of the said recited Act ; second. 

We therefore humbly recommend and propose that the said Canonry These two to 
in the Cathedral Church of Ely so lately held by the said George tothe Pro- 
Leonard Jenyns deceased shall upon and from the twenty first of Hebrew 
day next after the day on which any Order of your Majesty in Council ^S^^vliy. 
for ratifying this Scheme shall be published in the London Gazette 

> EnactmenU in Parliament, Bvo., Ozf. 1809, p. 183. 

11—2 



Notice 
given of the 
Bcheme. 



Thesdieme 
is now rati- 
fied. 



164 The Jive Regim Professorships 

and that the Canoniy in the same Church which shall next become 
vacant shall immediately upon the vacancy thereof become and be 
permanently annexed and united to the Regius Professorship of 
Hebrew and the R^us Professorship of Qreek respectively in the 
University of Cambridge in the order in which they are herein named 
and that the person who on such twenty first day shall be the B^us 
Professor of Hebrew and the person who at the time of the vacancy of 
such thirdly vacant Canoniy shall be the Regius Professor of Greek 
in the same University or in case the said Professorship or either of 
them shall at such respective times be vacant then the person next 
appointed to the one or the other as the case may be and every future 
Professor of Hebrew and of Qreek respectively in the same University 
shall be entitled to installation as a Canon of the said Cathedral 
Church and subject to the provisions of the said Act and all other 
Acts of Parliament shall and may hold the same Canonry with all the 
rights privileges and emoluments thereunto belonging so long as he 
shall remain and be such Regius Professor of Hebrew or of Greek as 
the case may be and no longer. 

And whereas previous to laying the said Scheme before Her Majesty 
in Council notice thereof was given to the Dean and Chapter of Ely 
and to the Master of Trinity College Cambridge and to the Rev. 
Samuel Lee Doctor in Divinity the Regius Professor of Hebrew in the 
University of Cambridge and to the Reverend James Scholefield the 
Regius Professor of Greek in the said University of Cambridge and 
certain objections and observations made and offered by the said 
Dean of Ely with the concurrence and by the desire of the said Chapter 
of Ely and also by the Master of Trinity College Cambridge and by 
the said Reverend Samuel Lee have been laid before Her Majesty in 
Council together with the said Scheme but no objections or observa- 
tions have been offered by the said Reverend James Scholefield ; And 
whereas the said scheme has notwithstanding the before mentioned 
objections and observations been approved by Her Majesty in Council ; 

Now therefore Her Majesty in Council by and with the advice of 
Her said Council is pleased hereby to ratify and confirm the said 
scheme and to order and direct that the same and every part thereof 
shall be effectual in Law immediately from and after the time when 
this order shall have been duly published in the London Gazette 
pursuant to the said Act and Her Majesty is pleased hereby to direct 
that this order be forthwith registered by the Registrar of the Diocese 
of Ely. 

Signed 

C. GREVILLE. 
Registered in the Diocese of Ely 26 day of August, 1848 ^ 



1 From the original in the Registiy of the University, Vol. zxxiz. A. 8. 



WUl of Mr George Jeremy 165 

F. Extract from the WUl of Oeorge Jeremy, M,A, 
25 March, 1871. 

...I give and bequeath to the TnisteeB or Guardians of the Treasuiy, 
or as it is styled the Chest of that Univensity [Cambridge] the sum 
of One thousand pounds of my new three per cent, annuities in order 
that the interest dividends and proceeds thereof may hereafter be 
devoted and applied by the Comicil of the Senate of that Community 
as an addition to the stipend or current income of the Regius Divinity 
Professor of that body for the time being.... 



2. Mathematics (Henry Lucas). 
1663. 

Mr Henry Lucas, founder of this Professorship, was a 
member of S. John's College, as he tells us in the passage 
from his Will quoted below, but there is no evidence that he 
matriculated. He was admitted to the honorary degree of 
Master of Arts, 4 February, 1635-36 ; and was elected one 
of the representatives of the University in Parliament, 
24 October, 1640^ He died 22 July, 1663. 

His Will, dated 11 June, 1663, contains the following 
bequest to the University: 

...And having thus distributed the charities I intended to the 
poore of my kindred, and withall paid the observances I owe to my 
friends, I consider in the next place the Vniuersitie of Cambridge 
where I receaved in the Colledge of Saint John parte of my education 
and since the honor to be chosen by them twice for one of theire 
burgesses in Parlyament 

And therefore to testifie my affection both to the place and learning 
I doe appoint and ordaine that my executors shall purchase lands to 
the value of one hundred pounds by the yearo to be imployed and 
setled as a yearely stipend and sallerie for a professor and reader of 
the mathematical! sciencies in the said Vniuersitie vnder such consti- 
tucions and orders as my executors with the advice of the Vice- 
chancellor and heads of Colledges for the tyme being in the said 
Vniuersitie shall iudge fittest for the honor of that greate body, and 
fpr the improvement and encouragement of that parte of learning 
which hitherto hath not bin provided for...*. 

> Dr Lnard*8 Catalogue of Documents in the Begbtry, Repreientative», 
No record has been preserved of a second election. 

' Copied from the Registry of Wills, Somerset House. 



166 Professorship of MaJtheniaJlics 

The executors, Robert Ra worth and Thomas Buck, lost no 
time in preparing statutes, which they issued 19 December, 
1663 (A). Their work was approved by King Charles the 
Second in letters patent dated 18 January, 1664 (B), in 
which some additional regulations are made. By a similar 
document dated 27 April, 1675 (C) the Professor was dis- 
pensed from the obligation of being in Holy Orders. 

The executors further purchased an estate in Bedfordshire, 
the rents of which amounted to the required value, and con- 
veyed it to trustees on behalf of the University, 31 January, 
1666-67*; but, as Isaac Barrow was elected the first Professor 
20 February," 1663-64, it is probable that it had passed into 
their hands before that date. 

There is no evidence that this benefaction was formally 
accepted by the University. 

The Council of the Senate framed a new statute for this 
Professorship, repealing most of the provisions of the deed of 
endowment, and another for the Lucasian, Plumian, Lowndean, 
and Sadlerian Professorships in common, 21 October, 1857. 
These statutes, with some alterations, received the sanction 
of the Queen in Council 7 March, 18601 By Statute B, 
cap. 18, the management of the estates is vested in the 
University. 



A. StattUes for the Professor, 1663. 

wrn^n? ^ Omnibus Christi fidelibus ad quos hoc praeseus scriptum pervenerit 

Lucu. Robertus Raworth de Qrayes Inn in Comitatu Middlesexiae, Armiger, 

et Thomas Buck de Cantabrigia in comitatu Cantabrigiae Armiger, 

£xecutoreB ultirai Teutameuti dignissimi viri Henrici Lucas de London 

Armigeri, nui)er defuncti, Salutem in Domino sempiternam. 

Sciatis, quod cum praedictus venerabilis et consultus vir Heuricus 
Lucas Armiger ex propenso suo in Academiam Cantabrigiensem, et in 
Preamble. rem literariam affectu a praefatis Roberto Raworth, et Thoma Buck, 
Executoribus suis, terras comparari ad valorem centum librarum 
annuatim supremo testamento mandaverit, in aimimm Profossoris, 
seu Lectoris Mathematicarum scieiitiarum in dicta Academia stipendium 

1 The deeds are in the Begistiy of the University, Box I. 
3 Statut€$, ed. 1S96, pp. 92, 95. 



endowed by Henry Iaums 



167 



vel salarium perpetuo cessuras, sub ejusmodi couBtitutiouibus et regulis, 
quas Execuiores sui, adhibito Procancellarii et Praefectorum CoUegiis 
dictae Aoademiae consilio, tarn honor! magni istius corporis, quam 
hujuflce literaturae, omni hactenus praemio destitutae, incremento ac 
promotion! judicaverint summopere accommodatas ; Nos praedicti 
Executores, pro ratione fide! nobis commissae de exequenda praeclari 
Benefactoris voluntate solicit!, rogato prius et impetrato dictorum Pro- 
cancellarii et Praefectorum consilio, habitoque ad id consilium praecipuo 
respeotu, ordinationes infra scriptas, promovendis istis studiis Mathe- 
maticis, uti arbitramur, apprime conducenteu, approbamus, omnique 
per dictum Henrici Lucas testamentum nobis conoessa authoritate ratas 
volimius et declaramus. 

Itaque statuimus imprimis et ordinamus, quod perpetuis futuris 
temporibus quicquid annul reditus (deductis necessariis expensis,) ex 
praenotatis terris ad usum praedictum acquisitis vel acquirendis qua- 
cunque justa ratione accreverit, id int^gre cedet in subsidium et 
praemium Professoris Mathematici, mode infra dicendo, et sub con- 
ditionibus mox exprimendis elect! et constituti. 

Quod officium attinet diet! Professoris Mathematici, ut horum 
studiorum, qua publioe, qua privatim, excolendorum ratio habeatur, 
volumus et statuimus ut dictus Professor teneatur singulis intra unius- 
cujusque termini Academic! spatium septimanis semel ad minus 
aliquam Qeometriae, Arithmeticae, Astronomiae, Geographiae, Opticae, 
Staticae, aut alterius alicujus Mathematicao disciplinae partem (pro 
suo arbitratu, nisi aliter expedire Procanoellario visum fuerit) per 
unius circiter horae spatium legere atque exponere, loco et tempore a 
Procanoellario assignandis, sub poena quadraginta solidorum pro singula 
lectione omissa, ex stipendio ipsi debito per Procancellarium subtra- 
hendorum, et Bibliothecae Academicae, pro coemendis libris, vol instru- 
mentis Mathematicis, applicandorum ; nisi ex gravi corporis infirmitate 
officio suo satisfacere non poterit. Quam tamen excusationem nolumus 
ultra tree septimanas valere, ut nisi elapsis tribus septimanis alium 
substituat idoneum Lectorem, Procancellarii judicio approbandum, 
sciat sib! pro qualibet lectione praetermissa viginti solidos de stipendio 
suo per Procancellarium subtrahendos, et usui praedicto applicandos^. 

Quo autem dictus Professor ad munus hoc legend! non perfunctorie 
praestandum efficacius astringatur, praestiti fideliter ab ipso officii 
certius extet indicium, et studiorum praesentium fructus quadantenus 
etiam ad posteros derivetur, statuimus ut dictus Professor semel quot- 
annis, proximo ante festum Sancti Michaelis non pauciorum quam 
decem ex illis quas praecedente anno publico habuerit, Lectionum 
exemplaria nitide descripta Procanoellario exhibeat, in publicis Aca- 
demiae archivis asservanda. Quod si ante tempus praescriptum facere 
n^lexerit, eo usque careat stipendio suo, donee effectum det, et quanta 
fuerit rata portio temporis postea elapsi, usque dum id perfecerit, 

1 Some words have been omitted in this sentence. 



Lucas has 
directed his 
executors to 
buy land to 
the value of 
£100 for the 
salaiyof a 
Frofeesorof 
Bfathema- 
tloB.aiidto 
make sta- 
tutes for the 



These 
statutes 
have been 
made. 



The entire 
rent to be 
paid to the 
Professor. 



Number and 
subiects of 
Us lectures. 



Fine for 
neglect of 
duty. 



What is to 
be done with 
the fines. 



Copies of his 
lectures to 
be handed 
to the Vice- 
Chancellor, 
and to be 
kept in the 
Public 
Library. 



168 



Professorship of Mathenuxtics 



ThePro- 
feMortobe 
at home on 
certain days 
to answer 
qaeetions. 



To keep ma- 
thematical 
Inetmmenta 
Inbia 



Tobead- 
moninhed 
for neglect 
of duty by 
Vioe-Oban- 
cellor. 
What re- 
sidence is 
required. 



Mar not 
undertake 
cure of souls. 



Standing 
and acquire- 
ments. 



Executors to 
elect Pro- 
fessor; after- 
wards the 
Heads of 
Colleges. 



tantam reditus suL vel salarii annul partem Procancellario teneatur 
exBolvere, Bibliothecae Academicae ad usus praedictos applicandam. 

Quinetiam deoemimus, ut dictus Professor teneatur duobus per 
singulas cujusque termini hebdomadas a Procancellario praestituendis 
diebus, unoque extra terminum die, quandocunque dictus Professor in 
Academia praesens fuerit, per duas boras itidem praefigendas omnibus 
ilium consulturis vacare, liberum adeuntibus aperto cubiculo acoessum 
praebere, circa propositas ipsi quaestiones, et difficultates baud graviter 
respondere; in eum finem globos et alia idonea instrumenta Mathe- 
matica penes se in promptu habere ; inque omnibus ad iUud propositum 
spectantibus studiosorum pro sua virili conatus adjuvare. 

Quorum aliquod si ultro neglexerit, corripiatur a Procancellario, 
et si de ueglecto officio saepius admouitus neutiquam se emendaverit, 
poenam incurrat intolerabilis negligentiae inferius decretam. 

Porro ut horum observatio fortius muniatur, et ne quis ex dicti 
Professoris absentia oboriatur n^lectus, statuimus ne dictus Professor 
intra praefinita terminorum intervalla Academia exoedat, aut alibi 
extra Academiam per sex dies continues moretiu:, nisi gravissima de 
causa per Procancellarium approbanda, idque petita prius et impetrata 
a Procancellario venia: sin fecerit secus, quanta fuerit rata portio 
temporis ab egressu suo praeterlapsi, tanta salarii sui parte penitus 
excidat Quod si forte diutioris ab Academia absentiae, quae dimidii 
termini spatium excedat, causa accident necessaria, Procancellarii, et 
duorum (qui CoUegiorum Praefecti fuerint) seniorum Doctorum judicio 
approbata, aliquem interea idoneum substituat, qui suo loco legat, et 
reliquis muniis fungatiu* mode supradicto, et sub poena consimili. 

Quinimo pari causa, ne dictus Professor ab officii sui debita 
executione distrahatur, nolumus omnino et prohibemus, ut is uUa 
quavis Ecclesiastioa promotione gaudeat, quae auimarum sibi curam 
adnexam habeat, aut residentiam exigat hisce statutis adversantem ; 
sub poena amissionis, ipso facto, omnis juris, quod in hac sua pro- 
fessione praetendere valeat 

Quoad personam vero et qualitatem Mathematici Professoris, 
volumus et injungimus, ut qui huic provinciae admovetur, sit vir 
bonae famae, et conversationis honestae, ad minimum Magister Artium, 
probe eruditus, et Mathematicarum praesertim scientiarum i^eritia 
instructus. 

f^us autem nominandi, et eligeudi jus ac potestas esto penes nos 
praedictos £xecutores venerabilis viri Henrici Lucas, durante nostra 
utriusque vita, aut uno supremum diem obeunte, i)enes alterum e 
nobis, qui in vita superstes permanserit. Postea vero perpetuis futuris 
temporibus ejus eligendi ))leua potestas sit penes Procancellarium, et 
Praefectos omnium CoUegiorum dictae Academiae, vel illam partem 
Praefectorum, qui electioni interfuerint^ et peragatur tunc electio in 
hunc modum. 

Postquam Mathematici Professoris locum quacunque ex causa 



endowed by Henry Lucas 169 

vacare contigerit, Procanoellario incumbet quam cito fieri poterit, what h to 
Bchedula scholarum publicarum ostio per octo dies continuoB afi&za, aTacancy. 
cum de dicta vacatione, turn de tempore ad futuram electionem 
destinato significare (tempus autem electionis ultra trigesimum a prima 
nignificatioDe diem extrahi nolumus) quo tempore dicti electores oathtobe 
publicis iu scholia in unum congregati juramento semetipsos obstriu- ae^rJ 
ganty seposito omni private respectu, affectuquo siniBtro, se nomina- 
turos, et suo comprobaturoe suffragio quem, conscientia teste, ex 
petitoribus, (vel ex iis qui ab electorum quolibet nominantur) maxime 
secundum praenotatas qualitates idoneum oensuerint ad id munus 
obeundum ; is vero, in quem plura sufiragia conspiraverint, pro electo if the voten 
habeatur: quod si duobus forte vel pluribus paria obvenerint suffragia, thence- 
Procancellario jus erit unum ex illis, qui aliis (si quando id oontigerit) bMaaulting 
pliua et inter se paria suffragia obtinuerint, pro sue arbitrio eligendi. ^^'^ 
Electus autem proximo opportune tempore admittatur a Procan- The i 



cellario, praestito ante admissionem juramento se munus Profcssoris date to be 
Mathematici a dignissimo viro Henrico Lucas in bac Academia insti- tbfvi^ ^^ 
tutum juxta ordinationes et statuta ofl&cium suum concementia, pro ChanceUor. 
suo posse fideliter executiurum. 

Denique, quo praedictus Professor intra dobitos honestatis atque ifthePro- 
modestiae limites contineatur, neque de ulla criminum ultro admis- gnUtyofany 
sorum impuuitate praesumat, statuimus ac decemimus, ut si dictus nesllwt^f 
Professor convictus fuerit vel propria confessione, vel per testes bemnovod!' 
idoneos, vel per evidentiam facti de crimine aliquo graviore (puta de 
laesa Majestate, haeresi, schismate, homicidio voluntario, fiurto notabili, 
adulterio, fomicatione, perjurio) vel si intolerabiliter negligens fuerit, 
neque poenis supcrius expressis poterit emendari, per Procancellarium 
et Coll(^orum Praefectos (vel majorem eorum partem) a sua amoveatur 
Professione, sine spe r^grediendi, aut commodum aliquod ulterius 
percipiendi. Quod si senio, morlK> diutunio, aut incurabili impotentia, if incapable 
seu debilitate corporis vel aiiimi fractus, suae Profession! (modo et ordieeaw. 
forma predictis) perficiendae non suffeoerit, abrogetur ei Professio per rSa^lid, 
Procancellarium et dictos Praefectos (vel majorem eorem partem) hoc ^^Se^ilfto 
tantum adhibito moderamine, ut illi (sic a Professionis muuere non sua !|^o^ 
culpa dimisso) si tempore Professionis suae laudabiliter se gesserit, 
neque alias ipse de proprio ad valorem centum librarum annuatim 
provisum fuerit, tertia pars stipendii remaneat usque ad mortem suam ; 
reliquis partibus successor sit tantisper contentus, integrum post ejus 
mortem peroepturus. 

In cujus rei testimonium nos praefati Robertus Raworth et Thomas 
Buck sigilla nostra praeseutibus apposuimus. Dat' 19 die Decembris 
Anno R^;ni Domini nostri Caroli Secundi Dei gratia Angliae, Scotiae, 
Franciae, et Hibemiae, Regis, Fidel Defensoris &c. decimo quinto, 
annoque Domini 1663 ^ 

^ From a certified copy of the original in the Registry of the University, 
Vol xxzix. 8. 2. 



iro 



Professorship of Mathematics 



B. Letters pcUent of King Charles the Second, 1664. 



Preamble. 



Rules made 
by the ex- 
ecutors are 
con Armed. 



Who may 
attend the 
lectures. 



Oaths to be 
taken by 
electors and 
elected. 



The Pro- 
fessor may 
be Fellow of 
a€k>Uege. 



Carolus Seciindus [etc.]. 
Cum per dilectos nostitw Robertum Raworth, et Thomam Buck 
Armigeros, Executores ultimae voluutatis consulti viri Henrici Lucas 
Armigeri nuper defuncti innotuerifc nobis dictum Heuricum Lucas in 
rei literariae beneficium Professoris Mathematici munus in Academia 
nostra Cautabrigiensi instituisse; nee non dictis iisdem Executoribus 
suis, adhibito Procancellarii et Praefectorum Collegiis dictae Academiae 
consilio, quae ad dicti muneris commodam constitutionem, ac execu- 
tionem debitam sibi ex usu viderentur, ordinandi curam commendasse : 
Et cum dicti Executores pro ratione fidei sibi commissae, rpgato prius 
et impetrato praedictonmi Procancellarii et Praefectorum consilio, 
ordinationes quasdam fecerint eo conducentes, quas a nobis suppliciter 
oraverint authoritate nostra r^ia stabilitas iri et ratificatas : Item 
cum dicti Executores de praedicto munere ulterius bene mereri 
studentes, juxta consilium praedictorum Procancellarii et Praefectorum, 
l)er sanctionem quoque nostram Regiam dicti Professoris lectionibus 
publice habendis certos ex Academicis auditores assignari ; ab elec- 
toribus dicti Professoris et ab electo Professore juramentum exigendi 
potestatem fieri ; dicto Professori, si Collegii cujusvis socius fuerit, 
sodalitii sui una cum dicto Professoris loco retinendi privilegium 
indulgeri ; et si ante susceptum hoc munus socius non fuerit, ut postea 
in socium eligi possit, facultatem couoedi ; eundemque demum Pro- 
fessorem a muneribus quibusdam publicis obeundis eximi ac prohiberi 
a nobis itidem supplices efflagitaverint ; 

Nos dictae Academiae commodo juxta ac studiorum profectui 
consultum cupientes, dictonimque votis Executorum benigne annuentes, 
imprimis ordinationes istas a predictis Executoribus confectas Regia 
nostra potestate sancimus et confirmamus, iisque omnibus et singulis 
plenum obsequium deberi atque praestari volumus et mandamus. 

Item lectionum, quas secundum ordinationes praedictas Professor 
Mathematicus habere tenetur, auditores esse volumus non-graduatos 
omnes post annum secundum, et Artium Baccalaureos omnes usque 
ad annum tertium sub eadem 2)oena, cui per statuta Academica obnoxii 
sunt a reliquis publicis Lecturis absentee. 

Quinetiam Procancellario potestatem impertimus juramentum exi- 
gendi et administrandi tarn illis, qui per dictas ordinationes eligendi 
jus obtinent, quam Professori electo et mox admittendo, juxta sensus 
in dictis ordinationibus expresses atque praescriptos. 

Porro volumus et statuimus, ut dictus Professor eligi i)Ossit in 
Bocium cujusvis collegii non vetante professioue sua ; et ne is sodalitio 
suo, si quod ante susceptum hoc mimus obtinuit, aut postea obtinebit, 
vel ullis sodalitii sui emolumentis aut pnvilegiis eo tantum nomine 
seu causa privetur, quovis cujuscunque collegii statuto non obstante. 



endowed by Henty Lucas 171 

Nohunus denique et i»t>hibemu8, ut praedictus Professor Decani, 2^°°^ • 
Thesaorarii, Seneschalli, aat Lectoris cujusTis in suo oollegio munus apeditod 
capessat^ aat ut inibi Tutorem se gerat (nisi -Nobilium forte vel ^Kmdty 
geiieroeonim socivB oommensalium) vel ut Procuratoris, T&xatoris, aut 
alterius cujualibet lectoris publicum in Academia officium sustineat, 
sub poena amissionis ipso fiicto omnis juris, quod in hac sua professione 
praetendere valeat. Quapropter et dictum Professorem ab omnibus et 
singulis muneribus istis praedictis liberatum volumus et exemptum. 

In cujus rei testimonium has literas nostras fieri fecimus patentes. 
Teste meipeo apud Westmonasterium decimo octavo die Jauuarii, anno s^our. 
regni noetri decimo quinto. Per breve de privato sigillo^ 

C. Letters patent of King Charles the Second, 1675. 

Carolus Secundus [etc.] 

Cum munus Professoris Mathematici in Academia nostra Ganta- 
brigiensi a consulto viro Henrico Lucas non ita pridem institutum 
authoritate nostra regia et Uteris patentibus stabiliverimus, et ordi- 
nationes ad idem munus spectantes ratificaverimus, et ad petitionem 
Executorum cum consUio Procancellarii et Praefectoram privil^a 
insuper nonnulla eidem Professori Mathematico in perpetuum conoes- 
serimus ; inter quae statuimus ut dictus Professor eligi possit in sociiuu 
cuiiisvis Coll^i non vetante Professione sua, et ne is sodalitio suo, si 
quod ante susoeptum hoc munus obtinuit aut postea obtinebit, vel uUis 
sodalitii sui emolumentis aut privilegiis eo tantum nomine seu causa 
privetur quovis cuiuscunque Coll^i statuto non obstante. Quod 
privil^om ea intentione illi indulsimus ut eidem Professori lioeret 
quodvis sodalitium capessere et retinere. 

Quod ut debitum sortiatur eflfectum nee restriction! alicui in UaFdiow 
damnum aut preiudicium eiusdem Professoris pateat indulgentia to be in the 
nostia, insuper volumus et statuimus ut verba nostra praedicta in gcnuoUier 
favorem dicti Professoris semper aocipiantur, ut non eo tantum sed 
nee alio quovis nomine aut causa sodalitio suo aut eius emolumento 
privetur nisi quod quemlibet eiusdem CoU^i socium cuiuscunque 
professionis aut ordinis merito privare debeat £t si)cciatim volumus ^[^ <^<>|^ 
et ordinamus ut ordines sacros non nisi ipse voluerit, suscipiat, nee Orden. 
ob defectum sacrorum ordinum sodalitio cedere ipse teneatur aut ab 
aliis quibuscunque oogatur, sed ea immunitate quamdiu suo munere 
fungitur gaudeat et fruatur qua quilibet socius Medicinae aut Juri 
Civili vel Canonico dicatus frui solet quovis cuiuscunque CoUegii 
Statuto aut oonsuetudine vel interpretatione quacunque non obstante. 

In cuius rei testimonium has literas nostras fieri fecimus patentes. 
Teste me ipso apud Wesmonasterium vicesimo septimo die Aprilis, sr April, 
anno regni nostri vicesimo septimo. Per breve de privato sigillo*. 

> From a copy in the Begistry of the University, Vol. zxxix. 8. 2. 
^ From a copy in the Kegistiy of the Univendty, Vol. xzxix. 8. 3. 



Fellows. 



ie75w 



172 Professorship of Arabic 



3. Arabic (Sir Thomas Adams). 
1666. 

In 1631, Mr Thomas Adams, draper, of London, agreed, 
at the suggestion of his friend and correspondent Mr Abraham 
WheelockeS to defray the charge of an Arabic Lecture, at 
£40 per annum, for three years from Lady Day, 1632. At 
the same time he announced his intention " to endeavour to 
perpetuate the same publick Lecture by a settled maintenance 
for ever'." The first lecturer was Mr Wheelocke, with whose 
work the University was so well pleased, that the Vice- 
Chancellor and certain Heads of Colleges addressed a letter 
of thanks to Mr Adams for the selection of so excellent a 
man (A). 

When this letter was written, the Lecture had been 
continued for four years instead of for three, as first in- 
tended ; but whether the same arrangement was continued 
until the death of Wheelocke (in September 1653) or 
whether it was interrupted by the Civil War, has not been 
ascertained. After the Restoration Sir Thomas Adams, as 
he had then become, having been created a Baronet by 
Charles the Second, 13 June, 1660, drew up a deed of 
endowment, dated 20 June 1666, by which the Drapers* 
Company are made trustees of his benefaction, and statutes 
for the Professorship are prescribed (B). There is no evidence 
that the University was consulted on this gift. The statutes 
were confirmed by royal letters patent', 4 July in the same 
year. The annual salary therein prescribed, £40, is still 
regularly paid by the Drapers' Company. 

In 1841 the endowment was increased by a legacy (C) 
of £1000 fix>m the Reverend John Palmer, B.D., Fellow of 

1 V^heelooke graduated from Trinity College: B.A. 1614, SI A. 1618; 
became fellow of Clare Hall 1619 ; and proceeded B.D. 1625. He was 
Ulnrarian of the Uniyersity 1629-58. 

' To Mr Wheelocke, 3 March, 1631 : quoted in Cooper's AnnaU, iii. 248. 

* Aa this document merely repeats the statutes given by Adams in his 
own deed, it has not been reprinted. It will be found in EndowmenU^ 
ed. 1876, p. 26. 



endowed by Sir T. Adam8 173 

S. John's College (Professor 1804-1819), who died Thursday, 
9 April, 1840^ 

A new statute for the Professorship, framed by the 
Council of the Senate in 1857, and approved by the Com- 
missioners, received the royal assent 16 April, 1861*; and, at 
the same time, a statute for Sir Thomas Adams' Professorship 
and other Professorships in common. This has since been 
repealed*. The clause in the deed of foundation, requiring 
the Professor Xo he ad minimum magister artium, was 
repealed by a statute which received the royal assent 
18 July, 1894\ 



A. The Vice-Chancellor and Heads of Colleges to 
Mr Adams\ 9 May, 1636. 

To our very loving and much respected friend Mr. Thomas Adams 
att his howse in Gracious Street in London. 

Worthy Sir, 

Having these foure yeares enioyed your bountiful! exhibition for 
the maintenaunoe of a Professor of the Arabick tongue in our University, 
and now also understanding your pious desire of setling it for i)erpetuity ; 
wee cannot but retiume yow the Scholars tribute of thanks and honor 
due to so noble a Benefactor, and shall upon any intimation from yow 
be ready to serve yow with our best counsells and endeavors for the 
improving it to those good ends to which yow intend it. 

The worke it selfe wee conceive to tend not onely to the advancement 
of good Literature by bringing to light much knowledge which as yet 
is lockt upp in that learned tongue ; but also to the good service of the 
King and State in our commerce with those Easteme nations, and in 
Qods good time to the enlarging of the borders of the Church, and 
propagation of Christian religion to them who now sitt in darkenesse. 
The genleman yow have pitched uppon for your Professor Mr. Abraham 
Wheelocke, wee doe every way approve of, both for his abilities and 
for his faithfuU paynes and diligence in that employment 

> The Senate presoribed the investment of this legacy in oonsols 90 Oct. 
1841. 

* Statutes, ed. 1S96, p. 96. 
» Ibid. p. 79. 

* Ibid. p. 71. 

' Copied from Stokys' Liher Rerum Memorabilium or Black Paper Book, 
preieryed in the Begistry of the University, fol. 228 b. 



174 ProfessorshipofAriibie 

Gk)d prosper the worke according to your pious intentioos ; and 
render a full reward of it to yow and yours ; making your memory as 
the memories of all other our famous Benefactors, ever precious among 
Us ! It is the harty desire and prayer of 

Your very loving freinds 

Hen : Smith procan : [Mr. of Magdalene] 

Samuell Ward Tho : fiatchcrofts 

[Mr. of Sidney Sussex] [Mr. of Gonv. and Cai.] 

S. Collins William Sandcrofte 

[Prov. of King's] [Mr. of Emmanuel] 

Tho : Bambrigg Rich : Sterne 

[Mr. of Christ's] [Mr. of Jesus] 

Gil Beale Edward Martin 

[Mr. of S. John's] [Presidt of Queens'] 

Dated att the Consistory 
May 9. 1636. 



B. Deed of foundation signed by Sir Tho. Adams. 

13 Juno, Omnibus Christi fidelibus ad quoe hoc Scriptum pervenerit Thomas 

^^^^ Adams Miles et Baronettus, Civitatisque Londinensis Aldermannus, 

Salutem in Domino sempiteniam. 

Sciatis quod ego predictus Thomas Adams ex proi)enso in Acade- 

miam Cantabrigiensem, et in rem literariam affectu, una cum Gulielmo 

renfofle^ '^dAi^^ Armigero filio meo et herede apparente, unum annualem 

^'ttS^A^^ redditum quadraginta librarum bone et legalis monete Anglie in 

Bcribed lands annuum Professoris seu Lectoris lintnie Arabice in dicta Academia 

ifl given to 

the Univer- stipendium vel salarium, exeuntem de Dome Dominicale de Chawreth 

br&^for alias Chawrey, horreis, stabulis, edifficiis et stnicturis atriis gardinis 
s^Profeawr^ ^t pomariis eidem spectantibus, et una pecia terre eidem adjungenti 
of Arabic continente per estimacionem quatuordecim acras, et uno campo 
vocato Chawreyhallfeild continente per estimacionem viginti acras, uno 
magno campo vocato Milfeild continente per estimacionem quadra- 
ginta acras, uno prato cum arbusto lupulato eidem adjungente conti- 
nentibus insimul septem acras ^)er estimacionem, uno alio prato 
vocato le Ley Meadow continente per estimacionem quatuor acras, uno 
campo vocato le Ley continente per estimacionem viginti et septem 
acras, uno campo vocato Crawleyfeild continente per estimacionem 
viginti et octo acras, uno clause pasturee vocato Oxwick continente per 
estimacionem decem acras, uno prato vocato Oxwickmead continente 
per estimacionem quatuor acras, et uno alio prato vocato Moore Oxe 
Meadow. continente per estimacionem septem acras, et una pecia terre 
boscalis vocata Le Ley Spring continente per estimacionem unam 
acram et dimidium acre. Omnia que quidem premissa iacentia et 



endowed by Sir T. Adams 176 

existeniia in parochia de Broxtod in Comitatu Essexie dimissa sunt ad 
firmam per predictum Thomam Adams Militem et Baronettum per 
nomen Thome Adams Armigeri cuidam Roberto Salmon per inden- 
turam gerentem datum septimo die Novembris anno Domini millesimo 
sexcentesimo quinquagesimo quarto pro termino viginti et unius 
annorum a festo Sancti Micbaelis tunc proximo sequente sub annuali 
redditu octoginta librarum et quatuor capis saginatis ad festa Annun- 
ciacionis beate Marie Virginis et Sancti Michaelis Archangeli per 
equales porciones durante termino predicto. 

Per indentiuam gerentem unum atque idem datum cum presen- *^°!|**»'* 
tibus factam inter nos prefatos Thomam Adams et Gulieknum Adams 
ex una parte et Ricardum Ryves Militem Aldermannum Civitatis 
Londini, Theophilum Biddulph Militem, Thomam fissington Armi- 
gerum, Edvardum Clagget,...^ et Robertum Adams Gives et Pannarioa 
Londini, et ex Assistentibus et sub insigniis Sodalitii Pannariorum 
Londinensis alumnos, ex altera parte, dedi, et adhibito Procancellarii 
Prefectorumque in eadem Academia CoUegiorum consilio, ordinationes 
infrascriptas condendas putavi, et per presentes ratas esse volo atque 
declaro. 

Statuo itaque imprimis ordinoque quod perpetuis futuris temporibus The afore- 
predictus annualis redditus integre cedet in subsidium et premium rent to be 
Professoris seu Lectoris lingue Arabice modo infra dicendo et sub FrofJl^^ 
conditionibus mox expresse tradendis electi atque constituti. 

Quod ofiicium attinet dicti Professoris Arabici ut hujus lingue qua He ia to give 
publico qim privatim cognoscende ratio habeatur, volo statuoque ut fneach mk 
dictus Professor teneatur singulis intra unius cuiusque termini Acade- Sn?ora^fln« 
mici spatium septimanis semel aut lingue Arabice rudimenta tradore Sn!!^"^^ 
ant authorem aliquem in ea lingua preclarum exponere per unius ^jT^^J^® 
circiter hore spatium loco et tempore a Procancellario assignandis sub ^.^"^i>^ 
pena decem solidorum pro singula lectione omissa ex stipendio ipsi 
debito per Procancellarium subtrahendorum ac Bibliotheoe Academie 
pro coemendis orientalis lingue libris applicandorum nisi ex gravi 
corporis infirmitate officio suo satisfacere non poterit Teneatur porro in vacation, 
per singulas extra terminum hebdomadas, si in Academia preaens fuerit, sidence, he 
duabus horis unius diei a Procancellario prestituendis omnibus ilium home for 
consulturis vacare, liberum adeun tibus aperto cubiculo acceasum one day hi*^ 
prebere, adipiscende excolendeve lingue Arabice cQgnitioni operam to^Weeaii 
dantium studia dirigere, et conatus adiuvare, quorum aliquid si ultro ^^^q. 
neglexerit, corripiatur a Procancellario, et si de n^lecto officio sepius "^^ ^^^i^- 
admonitus neutiquam se emendaverit, penam incurrat intolerabili fornegSct 
n^ligentie inferius decretam. 

Quod autem personam el 
spectat, volo et iniungo ut qui huic provincie admovetiur, sit vir bone Kofealor 



Quod autem personam et qualitatem Professoris huius Arabici QuaUflca- 
Ti. i^-- ^ I- J ^ xi UonaofUie 



^ The omittod passage oontains the names of 15 members of the Drapers' 
Company. 



176 Professorship of Arabic 

fame et conversationis honeste, ad minimum Magister Artium, probe 
eruditus, et linguarum orientalium prsDcipue Arabice peritia instructus, 
et qui nullo alio ProfessoriB aut Lecture loco seu officio gaudeat (nisi 
forte ante admissionem deponero voluerit). Inter autem personas ita 
eligibiles ceteris paribus proferri volo Praefectos CoU^orum, dein 
Collegiorum socios, exin Magistros artium Academie gremiales. 
^AHtoareto Eius autem uominandi et eligendi ius ac potestas esto penes 

meipsum quamdiu vixero, postea vero perpetuis futuris temporibus 
eius eligendi potestas sit penes Procanoellarium et Prsefectos omnium 
Collegiorum vel illam partem Prsefectorum qui electioni interfuerint 
^i^fon' Et peragatur tunc electio in hunc modum. Postquam Arabici 

• Professoris locum quacuuque ex causa vacare contigerit, Procancellario 

incumbet quam cito fieri poterit schedula Scholarum publicarum ostio 
per octo dies continues affixa, tum de dicta vacatione tum de tempore 
ad futmram Aectionem destinato significare (tempus autem electionis 
ultra trigesimum a prima significatione diem extrahi nolo) quo tempore 
dicti Electores publicis in scholis in unum congregati iuramento semet- 
ipsos obstringant seposito omni privato respectu affectuque sinistro 
se nominaturos, vel saltem suo comprobaturos suffragio, quem con- 
scientia teste ex petitionibus vel ex iis qui ab electorum quolibet 
nominantur maxime secundum prenotatas qualitates et limitationes 
idoneum censuerint ad id munus obeundum. Is vero in quem plura 
Cue of suffi^a conspiraverint pro electo habeatiur. Quod si duobus forte vel 

0? votes. pluribus paria obvenerint suffragia Procancellario ius erit unum ex 
illis qui (si quando id contigerit) plura et inter se paria obtinuerint 
pro suo arbitratu eligendi. 
Oath to be Electus autem proximo opportune tempore admittatiu* a Procan- 

Profeasor. cellario prestito ante admissionem suam juramento se munus Pro- 
fessoris Arabici a Thoma Adams Milite et Baronetto in hac Academia 
institutum iuxta ordinationes et statuta officium suum concementia 
pro suo posse fideliter executurum. 
fiemovaiof Denique quo predictus Professor intra debitos honestatis atque 

offences or modestie terminos contineatiur, neque de ulla criminum ultro^ admis- 
dot^'* °' sorum impunitate presumat, statuo atque decemo ut si diotus Professor 
convictus fuerit vel propria confessione vel per idoneos testes, vel per 
evidentiam fiicti de crimine aliquo graviore (puta de Isesa Maiestate, 
hseresi, scfaismate, homicidio voluntario, furto notabili, adulterio, fomi- 
catione, periurio) vel si intoIerablHtur negligens fuerit, neque penis 
superius expressis poterit emendari, vel sua lectiura minime contentus 
alium Professionis aut Lecture locum obtinuerit, per Procancellarium 
et Collegiorum Prsefectos vel maiorem eorum partem a sua amoveatiu: 
Professione sine spe regrediendi aut commodum aliquod ulterius 
percipiendi. 

Quod si senio, morbo diutiuno, aut incurabili impotentia seu 

» MS. vltra. 



endowed hy Sir T. Adams 177 

debilitate corporis vel animi fractus^ sue Professionis officio modo et ^JjjiJJ 
forma predictis prestando non suffecerit, abrogetur ei Professio per thi^^old 
Procancellanum et dictoe Prefectos vel maiorem eorum partem, hoc SSithheit 
tantum adhibito moderamine, ut illi sic a Professionis munere non sua third^^liifl 
culpa dimisso (si tempore Professionis sue laudabiliter se gesserit neque ''^^' 
alias ipsi de proprio ad valorem quadraginta librarum annuatim 
pro visum fuerit) tertia pars stipendii remaneat usque ad mortem suam ; 
reliquis partibus successor sit tantisper contentus integrum post ejus 
mortem percepturus. 

In cuius rei testimonium, Ego Thomas Adams Miles et Baronettus 
Civitatisque Londinensis Aldermannus sigillum meum praasentibus 
apposui. « 

Dat* vicesimo die Junii, anno regni Caroli Secundi Dei gratia 
AnglisB ScotisD Francise et Hibemise Regis, Fidei Defensoris &c. decimo 
octavo, Annoque Domini 1666. 

THOMAS ADAMS (L. S.)^ 



C. Extract from the WiU of the Rev. John Palmer, B,D. 

I give to the University of Cambridge the sum of one thousand 
pounds sterling for the perpetual augmentation of Sir Thomas Adams' 
Professorship of Arabic, subject to the following conditions : 

First, that the Professor shall provide a book in which, at the end 
of every public Lecture, each student of that language shall write his 
name and College with his own hand ; 

Second, that the Vice-Chancellor, whenever application shall be 
made to him for the payment of this augmentation, shall inspect the 
said book and satisfy himself that the Professor has fulfilled bond fide 
the duties enjoined by the oath of his admission ; 

Third, that the Vice-Chancellor, if he be not satisfied that the 
Professor has fulfilled his duties as aforesaid, shall not pay this 
augmentation for that year, but shall. retain the same and all other 
augmentations forfeited in the same manner until the sums so accruing 
can be invested conveniently from time to time in the Public Funds 
for the further perpetual augmentation of the same Professorship'. 

1 From the original in the Begistry of the University, Box. I. 4. 
* From a copy of the devise in the Begistry, Vol. zxzix. 7. 11. 



c. 12 



1 78 Professorship of Moral Theology 



4. Moral Theology (John Knightbridge). 
1677. 

The Reverend John Knightbridge, fellow of Peterhouse', 
and Rector of Spofforth in Yorkshire, by Will dated 
2 December, 1677, made the following provisions: 

I give unto the Master and Fellowes of Peterhoiiae in Cambridge, 
as feofees in trust and upon the condition afterwards exprest all that 
my fee farme rent issuing out of the Mannor of Heslington neer Yorke, 
as also an house in the Minorys, whereof one Cooke is now my Tenant, 
as also seaven pounds per Annum out of the land I have lying in 
Chelmsford, knowne by the name of little Vinters. All these I give 
unto the said Master and Fellowes, upon condition that they pay unto 
a Professor in Moral Theology or Casuisticall Divinity the sum of fifty 
pounds yearely. Provided allwayes that the Professor aforesaid be 
chosen by the Vice-Chanoellour of Cambridge for the time being, the 
Regius and Margaret Professors, and the Master of Peterhouse for the 
time being, and if it should happen that there should be discord in the 
election that is to say two for one and two for another, then the 
Master of Peterhouse shall have the casting voica And my will is 
the Professor to be choeen shall bee of the age of fifty yeares, and 
Doctor or at least Batchellour in Divinity, and my will is that the 
Professour so chosen shall read five Latine Lectures in the Publique 
Schooles of Cambridge in every terme, and shall at the end of every 
terme exhibite a copy of the said five Lectures fairely written to the 
yioe-Chancellor for the time being, to be either printed or kept in the 
Publique Library of the University as shall be thought meet. And my 
will is that if the Professor so chosen shall neglect to read any of the 
said five Lectures every terme, without some reasonable cause to be 
approved of in writing under the hands of the major parte of the said 
Electors, then it shall be lawfuU for the Master and Fellowes of 
Peterhouse to withdraw the said maintenance to their owne use till 
the said Professor do read the said Lectures as is above directed'. 

Mr Knightbridge died in December, 1677, when it was 
discovered that the Will and Codicils were invalid to pass 
freehold estate, as his signature was not attested by any 
witness. But his brother and heir at law, Mr Anthony 
Elnightbridge, being desirous of carrying out his intentions, 
confirmed the various devises in the Will. In the next place 

1 B.A. Oxf. incorp. 1645; M.A. 1646; B.D. 1666; D.D. 1673. 
Prom a copy in the Registry of the UniTersity, Vol. zxxix. 9. 1. 



endowed by Dr John KnigMbridge 179 

the trustees were unable to find a fit person to undertake the 
Professorship according to the tenns of the Will. Application 
was therefore made to the Court of Chancery, and a decree 
was obtained, 18 July 1682, allowing the Professor to be of 
the age of forty years, and to deliver four lectures in each 
terra in lieu of five\ Shortly afterwards the Rev. Tho. 
Sraoult, D.D., Fellow of S. John's College, was elected*, and 
retained the Professorship till his death in 1707. 

In 1700 (10 October) the Senate decided by Grace that 
the name of John Knightbridge should be added to the 
benefactors of the University". 

Professor Smoult, by Will dated 29 September, 1703, 
made the following bequest: 

Item I give three hundred pounds to purchase land or any rents 
of that value to be annexed and joyned to the settlement made by 
Dr John Knightbridge now kept in St Peter's College for the use and 
maintenance of a Casuist Reader or Professor in Practical Theology 
the land or purchase to be settled upon the same or other trustees at 
the discretion of my executor*. 

This sum was laid out in the purchase of several pieces 
of land of copyhold tenure ; and it was decided by Grace 
(11 June, 1713) that the name of the donor should be added 
to the benefactors of the University". 

In 1839 (6 July) the Court of Chancery decided that the 
Professor was entitled to the whole rents and profits of the 
trust premises'. 

Interesting information respecting the sale of a portion 
of the property and other matters concerning the trust, is 
contained in a decree of the Court of Chancery dated 4 June, 
1847 ; but, as the document is readily accessible', it need not 
be reprinted. 

In 1857 (15 December) a new statute was accepted by 

^ A copy of this decree is in the Registry of the Uniyersity, Vol. xzxiz. 
9.6. 

> A Grace passed the Senate 10 Oet. 16S3, that he should take rank 
among the other Professors. 

s Grace Book 9, p. 463. 

* Begistiy, ul iwpra^ Vol. xxxix. 9. 6. 

» Grace Book 9, p. 613. « Registry, Vol. xxxix. 9. 23. 

' See Endowments of the University, ed. 1876, pp. 37 — 52. 

12—2 



180 Professor of Music 

the Senate, further relaxing the conditions of election, and 
vesting the management of the Trust Estate and Funds in 
the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars. This statute was con- 
firmed by the Queen in Council 16 April, 1861 ; and in 1873 
(18 July) a decree of the Court of Chancery^ vested the real 
estate and the funds, in the University. 

By Statute B, Chap. XV, it is enacted that the Professor 
shall be elected in accordance with the provisions of Chap. IX, 
and that the Professorship shall in future be designated as a 
Professorship of Moral Philosophy. 

5. Music. 
1684. 

A -Professor of Music was first appointed by a Grace of 
the Senate, 2 July, 1684, expressed in the following terms: 

Cum par sit et aequum, atque etiam e dignitate Academiss, ut 
el^antisaima facultas Musicce suum quoque baud secus ac cseterffi, 
Professorem habeat : Placet Vobis ut Senattls auctoritate constituatur 
Musioes Professor, atque ut omatissimus vir Dr Staggins hac vestra 
gratia in illud munus rit^ electus Domine et titulo publici vestri in 
Miisica Professoris insigniatur^. 

No stipend was assigned to Professor Staggins, nor to 
any of his successors, until 1868, when £100 was allowed 
to Professor Stemdale Bennett, "so long as he continues 
Professor of Music'." 

Professor Bennett died 1 February, 1875, and in the 

interval between his death and the election of a successor 

the Council of the Senate issued a report, proposing, among 

other things, " that a stipend of £200 per annum should be 

assigned to the next Professor of Music." This was confirmed 

by Grace 4 March, 1875*. The same amount is granted by 

the existing ordinance, confirmed by the Senate 24 November, 

1887. The Professor will in future be elected according to 

Statute B, Chap. XV. 

^ Begistiy, ut supra, Vol. xxxiz. 9. 59. 

^ Grace Book 9, p. 250. Nicolas Staggins had been .admitted Mus.D. 
per lit teg, 28 Sept. 1681. 

3 The Grace passed 27 February, 1868. Grace Book 2, p. 321. 
* Grace Book T, p. 19. 



Professor of Chemistry 181 



6. Chemistry. 
1703. 

The first Professor of Chemistry was elected by the 
following Grace, which passed the Senate, 10 February, 
1702-3: 

Cum Johannes Franciscus Vigani Veronensis Artem Chymicam 
multa cum laude (non sme magno studiosorum emolumento) per annos 
viginti hie apud nos exercuerit; Placeat Vobis ut dictus Johannes 
Franciscus Vigani titulo Professoris Cbymiao in Academia Oantabrigi- 
ensi cohonestetiur. 

Placeat etiam ut super has concessioue vestra literas habeat vestras 
testunoniales muneris sui Professorii sigillo vestro communi sigillatas^. 

In 1716 (10 October) a building called the New Press, 
opposite to Queens* College, was assigned to the joint use 
of the Professors of Chemistry and Anatomy*, which the 
former retained until 1784, and the latter until 1832*. 

No stipend was assigned to the Professor until 1766, 
when Richard Watson, M.A. (Professor 1764-73) obtained 
a stipend of £100 a year from the Crown, through the 
intervention of Lord Rockingham*. This stipend, with 
others, was annually voted by Parliament, and paid by the 
Treasury, until the Cambridge University Act, 1856, became 
law. This contains a provision (Chap. XLYII) that the Stamp 
Duties on Matriculations and Degrees are remitted, but that 
provision is to be made by the University for pajdng the 
above salaries. The Senate therefore pledged itself, by 
Grace, 10 December, 1857, that the following sums, hereto- 
fore paid by the Treasury, should in future be paid by the 
Vice-Chancellor : 

Cum capite 88", sect, 47^, legis anno Victorice reginai 19® e^ 20» 
IoUb stattUum fuent tU aholeatur vectigal pro impreMiotie, quod nunc 
temporia fisco pejidendum est ah its qui vel in matriculam academios 
vd ad gradus admittendi aunty quvm primvm suatentandis oneribua, 
quibua hactenua aubventum eat pecuniarum ope ex Parliamenti conaidtOy 
quotannia factOy a dominia aerarU erogatarumy ita proviaum fuerit ut 

1 Orace Book 9, p. 490. * Ibid. p. 667. 

* AreJu Hiat. Vol. ill Chap. n. 

^ Cooper's AnnaU, iy. S43. Anecdotea of the Life of Richard Wataon, 
4to, 1817, pp. 30-^2. 



182 Professor of Anatomy 

dominis cerarii satis sit factum ; Placeat vobis iU e cista oommuni in 
posterum numerentur quotannis a ProcatvceUario 

Professori Historioe Moderncs Begio libras 371, 

Lectori in Jure Civili Regio lihrai 100, 

Lectori in Chemia librae 100, 

Lectori in Anatomia lihras 100, 

Lectori in Botanica lihrai 182, 

Lectori Jacksoniano lihrce 100, 

Lectori in MineraZogia librce 100. 

In 1857 (15 December) a new statute for the Professorship 
was confirmed; and in 1861 (8 May) the Council of the Senate 
recommended that the stipend of the Professor be increased 
to £300 a year. This was confirmed 30 May. In 1871 
(30 January) it was recommended that his stipend be in- 
creased to £500 a year. This recommendation was confirmed 
9 February, 1871. 

The Professorship is now governed by Statute B, 
Chaps. IX, XI, XV. 

7. Anatomy. 
1707. 
The first Professor of Anatomy was elected by the 
following Grace, which passed the Senate 12 June, 1707 : 

Cum Georgius Rolfe varias Anatomias in hac Academia perfeoerit 
summa cum laude in usum StudiossQ Juventutis optimum 

Placeat Vobis ut Professoris Anatomici Titulum propter singularem 
ejus in ista facultate peritiam Honoris ergo consequatur^. 

In 1857 (15 December) a statute, since repealed, was 
made for this Professorship. It received the royal assent 
16 April, 1861'. 

In 1861 (8 May) a Syndicate appointed 7 March in that 
year recommended that the Professor should in future 
"receive from the University Chest... such a sum as will 
augment [his] Endowment Stipend' to £300 per annum." 
This recommendation was confirmed by Grace 30 May, 1861. 

In 1865 (12 June) a Syndicate reported in favour of 
dividing this Professorship, and appointing: (1) a Professor 

1 Grace Book 6, p. 545. 

« Statutes, ed. 1869, p. 87. 

> For the history of this stipend see Professor of Chemistry. 



Reghfs Professor of Modem History 183 

of Anatomy with (2) a Demonstrator in Anatomy; (3) a 
Professor of Zoology and Comparative Anatomy. These 
recommendations were confirmed by Grace, 8 February, 1866. 
The Professorship is now governed by Statute B, 
Chaps. IX, XI, XV. 



8. Modern History (Regius). 
1724. 

In 1724 (16 May) King George the First sent a letter to 
the University (A) in which he states his intention to appoint 
a "Person of Sober Conversation and prudent Conduct, 
skilled in Modem History and in the knowledge of Modem 
Languages, to be Our Professor of Modem History," with 
a stipend of £400 per annum, out of which he "shall be 
obliged to maintain, with sufficient salaries, two Persons at 
least well qualified to teach and instruct in writing and 
speaking the said languages " ; and further, that he intends 
to nominate twenty scholars, each of whom " shall be obliged 
to learn two at least of the said languages." A yearly 
report is to be sent to the King by the Professor and the 
teachers, giving an account of the progress made by each 
scholar. 

On the reception of this letter a Congregation was held 
(18 May) and a reply (B) was agreed to, which was directed 
on the following day to be engrossed, sealed, and transmitted 
to the King. 

The letters patent (C) founding the Professorship on the 
lines indicated in the above letter, are dated 28 September 
in the same year ; and, 20 October following, by an instm- 
ment under the privy signet, the King appointed Samuel 
Harris, M.A., Fellow of Peterhouse, to be the first Professor. 

The twenty scholars mentioned in the letters patent 
were appointed by two similar instruments signed by the 
King and countersigned by Lord Townshend ; the first 15 on 
February 27, 1724-25, and the remaining five on May 31 \ 

^ These documents are in the Begistry of the University, Vol. xxxix. 
14. 8, 9. 



184 Regius Professor of Modern History 

Professor Harris makes his first report to the Duke of 
Newcastle for transmission to the King, 26 October, 1725 ; 
and encloses a more detailed account of the progress made 
by the scholars in modem languages signed by the two 
teachers, and dated 14 October in the same year. No record 
of the appointment of these teachers, Fr. Masson, and 
H. B. Piazza, has been preserved. The reports sent in were 
evidently satisfactory, for Harris was reappointed by an 
instrument dated 18 November, 1725; and again in the 
following year, by a similar instrument dated 28 September, 
1726. A second report, giving a further account of the 
progress made by the scholars, is dated 3 April, 1727 S and 
five more scholars were appointed 30 April in the same year. 

The King died 11 June, 1727. His successor, by letters 
patent, dated 11 April, 1728 (D), expresses his intention of 
continuing the foundation with all his father's provisions; 
but no more scholars have been appointed, and the Professors 
retain their office " during His Majesty's pleasure." 

A new statute for this Professorship received the Royal 
assent 16 April, 1861'. It repealed the directions contained 
in the above letters patent, except so far as relates to the 
appointment of the Professor by the Crown. 



Historical Libra rv. 

The Will, dated 8 March, 1806, of John Symonds. LL.D., 
Professor 1771-1807, contains the following clause: 

Also it is my will and meaning that any book or books and manu- 
scripts in or on which the name or names of any person or persons 
shall be found written with my own hand shall be delivered and given 
to such persons by my executors'; 

1 These reports are in the Public Becord Office, and copies in the 
Begistry of the Uniyersity. On the whole subject of this foundation, with 
a remmi of the reports from Oxford, see a paper by Oscar Browning, M.A. 
(King's) in The Cambridge Review, 25 November and 9 December, 1897. For 
the history of the stipend see Professor of Chemistry, pp. 181, 182. 

> Statutes, ed. 1896, p. 98. 

' Copied in the Begistry of Wills, London. Prof. Symonds died 
18 February, 1807. 



Historical Library 185 

and, in an undated codicil, he gives directions about " books 
not marked for the Historical Library at Cambridge." It 
may therefore be claimed for Symonds that he founded that 
library, by his Will. His successor. Professor Smyth (1807-49), 
added a large number of volumes. 

This library, consisting of about 1600 volumes, is for the 
present housed in King's College*; and an annual grant of 
£30 is allowed for maintenance ^ 



A. Letter of King George the First to the University, 1724. 

Endorsed: To Our Trusty and Welbeloved the Vice-ChanoeUor of 
Oar University of Cambridge, to be communicated to the Senate there. 

Qeorge R. 

Trusty and Welbeloved, We greet you well I 

We being greatly desirous to favoiu* and encourage Our two Uni- 
versitys, those ancient and laudable Nurserys of Piety and Learning ; 
and to enable them more effectually to answer the end of their Institu- 
tion by sending forth constant Supplys of learned and able Men to 
serve the Publick both in Church and State; And having observed 
that no Encouragement or Provision has hitherto been made in either 
of the Said Universitys for the Study of Modem History or Modern 
Languages, the knowledge of which is highly necessary towards com- 
pleatly qualifying the Youth committed to their Care for Several 
Stations both in Church and State to which they may be called ; and 
having Seriously weighed the prejudice that has accrued to the Said 
Universitys from this Defect, Persons of Foreign Nations being often 
employed in the Education and Tuition of Youth both at home and in 
their Travels ; and great numbers of yoimg Nobility and Gentry being 
either sent abroad directly from School or taken away from the Uni- 
versitys before the Course of their Studys can be there compleated, 
and Opportunitys frequently lost to the Crown of employing and 
enco\uraging Members of the two Universitys by conferring on them 
such Employment both at home and abroad, as necessarily require a 
competent Skill in writing and Speaking the Modem Languages. 

In order therefore to remedy these and the like Inconvenioncys, We 
have determined to appoint two Persons of Sober Conversation and 
prudent Conduct, of the Degree of Master of Arts or Beu^helour of 
Laws, or of Some higher Degree in one of the Said Universitys, Skilled 

1 Reporter, 1890, p. 112. 

3 Grace 4 June, 1891, Reporter, p. 948. 



186 Regius Professor of Modem History 

in Modem History and in the knowledge of Modem Languages, to be 
Nominated by Us, to be Our Professors of Modern History, one for the 
University of Cambridge, and the other for that of Oxford, who Shall 
be obliged to read Lectures in the Publick Schools, at Such times as 
shall hereafter be appointed ; 

And We have further determined that each of the Said Professors 
shall have a Stipend of Four Hundred Poimds per Annum, and out of 
the Said Stipend shall be obliged to maintain with sufficient Salarys, in 
the University where he shall be established, two Persons at least, well 
qualified to teach and instmct in writing and Speaking the Said 
Languages ; which Said Teachers shall be under the Direction of the 
Professors respectively, and shalP [be obliged to instruct] gratis in the 
Modem Languages [twenty] Scholars of each University, to be nomi- 
nated by Us, and each Scholar so nominated shall be obliged to learn two 
at least of the Said Languages, both the Professors and Teachers taking 
especial Care that the times and hours for the instructing and teaching 
the Said Scholars be so ordered, sm not to interfere with those appointed 
for their Academical Studys, which Professors and Teachers shall also 
be obliged once every Year to transmit an attested Account of the 
Progress made by each Scholar committed to their Care to Our 
Principal Secretarys of State, to be laid before Us, that We may 
encourage the diligence and Application of such amongst them, as - 
shall have qualified themselves for Our Service, by giving them suitable 
Employments either at home or abroad, as occasion shall offer. 

And Our Royal Will and Pleasure is, that you forthwith, upon the 
Receipt hereof, call a Congregation, in order to communicate these Our 
Royal Intentions to the University. And So We bid you farewell 
Given at Our Court at St James's the 16"» Day of May 1724 in the 
Tenth Year of Our Reign. 

By His Majesty's Command 

TOWNSHEND*. 



B. Thanks of the University to the King, 1724. 

Most Gracious Sovereign, 
We your Majesty's most dutiful and Loyal Subjects, the Chancellor, 
Masters, and Scholars of Your University of Cambridge, having been 
honoured with Your Majesty's Royal Letter, which has been read to us 
in full Senate, Intimating your gracious and Princely intentions of 
establishing both in this and Your other University a New Professor- 

^ In this line and the next a piece has been torn out of the MS. The 
words omitted have been supplied from the copy of the letter in Graoe 
Book I, p. 99. 

' From the original in the Registry of the University, Vol. zzziz. 14. 6. 



Thanks of the Senate to the King 187 

ship of Modem History and Modem Languages, with an Appointment 
so ample as Welnigh to equal the Stipends of all our other Professors 
put together, beg leave to approach Your Sacred Person, with the 
sincerest assurances of Duty Loyalty and Gratitude, which such 
unparallell'd Munificence requires. 

Your Majestie, like a Common Father that is Watchfull for the 
Welfare of his Children, has Wisely observed where our greatest defect 
lay, and where Your relief could be most seasonably apply'd. We have 
for many years, with grief observed, and may now with assurance 
venture to speak out our grievance, since Your Majesty has been 
pleased to enter so far into our aiuse, as to join in the same complaint, 
that foreign tutors have had so large a share in the Education of our 
Youth of Quality both at homo and in their travels, and we are 
thoroughly sensible that the Reason, why they have been so employed, 
in Preference to Men of far Superiour Learning of our own country, has 
been the Want of proper hel|)s towards the attaining those Accomplish- 
ments in our Universities, for which Your Majestie is now making so 
honourable Provision, but we are now firmly perswaded that when 
Your Maj^^<" noble design shall have taken effect, when there shall be a 
sufiScient number of Academical Persons well vers'd in the knowledge 
of Foreign courts, and well instmcted in their re8i)ective languages, 
when a familiarity with the living tongues shall be su^x^radded to that 
of the dead ones, when the solid learning of antiquity shall be adorned 
and set off with a skillful habit of conversing in the Languages that 
now flourish & both be accompanied with English Probity, Our 
Nobility & Gentry will be under no Temptation of sending for persons 
from foreign Comitries, to be entrusted with the education of their 
Children : That the api)earance of an English Gentleman in the Courts 
of Europe with a Govemour of his own Nation, will not be so rare, & 
uncommon as it has hitherto been, & that Your two Universitys thus 
refin'd & made more compleatly serviceable to the Education of Youth 
by Your Majesties most Judicious & well directed as well as liberal 
Benefaction, will be able to fumish You with a constant supply of 
Persons every Way qualified for the Management of such weighty 
affairs & negotiations as Your Majesties Occasions may require. 

We most heartily beseech the Almighty to prosper this, and all 
Your great and Glorious Undertakings, that you may long live & 
reign till you have received the fullest Conviction that your Royal 
Purpose has not been frustrated, but that this new Institution has 
Proved (as Your Princely Wisdom intended it should) a real & National 



In Return for such repeated obligations we shall not fail to put up 
our incessant Prayers to God for the Preservation of Y' Majestie & 

^ The omitted passage concems the appointment of Whitehall Preachers, 
(see above, p. 46), and other matters. 



188 Hegim Professor of Modern History 

your Royal Family, & shall always endeavour to contribute in the best 
manner we are able to the Tranquillity, Peace, & good order of your 
Qovemment. 

May the 19^^ 1724i. 



Iffnoranoe 
of modem 
history and 
modern 
lantruaires 
In the Uni- 
vendtieB. 



C. Letters patent of King George the First, 1724. 

Georgius Dei Gratia, &c. Omnibus ad quos &c. 
Quum Academiae nostrae eo coiisilio institutae fuerint ut viros 
erudites et praestantes turn in Beipublicae quum in Eoclesiae sub- 
sidium perpetud successione suppeditarent, quumque in hoc regno 
utpote exteris nationibus per legationum foederum et commerciorum 
vincula undequaque illigato, varia extent munia quae uon modo accu- 
ratam illam veteris litteraturae voterumque linguarum peritiam quae 
tantd cum laude in Academiis uostris floret, sed etiam recentioris 
historiae scientiam linguarumque hodiernarum tmn in scribendo quum 
in loquendo usum et facilitatem apprime desiderant ; quibus tamen 
addiscendis et excolendis nulla ckdhuc in utr&vis Academic proposita 
sunt praemia aut adjumenta; ex quo defectu fjEictum est ut bona 
juventutis ingenuae pars, magno suo cum inconunodo, aut alienigenis 
statim educanda tradatur, aut studiorum Academicorum stadio non- 
dum confecto in partes exteras dimittatur; utque homines peregrini 
destinata Academicis favoris nostri testimonia necessitate qu^am 
nonnunquam intercipiant. 

Sciatis igitur quod nos tot tantisque incommodis mederi studentes 
Academiamque nostram Cantabrigiae (ad regum proavorum exemplum) 
uon tueri solum sed etiam ornare et augere cupientes, de nostrd speciali 
grati^ scientid. cert& et mero motu creavimus, ereximus, ordina\dmus, 
fecimus, constituimus et stabilivimus perque has praesentes creamus, 
erigimus, ordiuamus, facimus, constituimus et stabilimus in Academic 
nostra Cantabrigiensi praedict& officium sive munus Professoris in 
Modern^ Historic. Qui quidem Professor vir erit iis dotibus eoque 
gradu in praedict& nostrd Academic omatus, eoque modo ac form& 
nominandus, designandus atque admittendus ad dictum Professoris 
officium, quemadmodum a nobis per has praesentes inferius declaratur. 
Idemque Professor ea munia obibit, iisque fungetur officiis, talique 
gaudebit stipendio, quemadmodum per has praesentes infra describitur, 
videlicet : 
Profenorto (1) Nos per has praesentes volumus, statuimus et mandamus quod 
LL.B. or of Professor praedictus vir erit honestate morum &g prudenti& laudabiUs, 
dk^^ll^ ^ quod gradum habebit vel Magistri in artibus vel Baccalaurei in legibus 

1 Grace Book I, p. 100. This letter was read to the Senate 18 May, 
with the following Grace, which passed on the following day: "Placeat 
Yobis at Litene modo lectss transcribantur et Gommoni Yestro sigillo 
sigillatss prsBsententur Begiie Majestati vestro nomine." 



A ProfesBor 
of Modem 
History to 
be ap- 
pointed. 



Letters pcOent of King George I. 189 

vel aliquem altioris etiam ordinis in nostr& praedictft Academic ; quod 
nuncupabitur Professor R^ius in Modern^ Historic, quodque de tem- 
pore in tempus a nobis nominabitur ad idem Professoris Officium per 
instrumentum manu nostrft regi4 signatum. Quod quidem instrumen- To beap- 
tum Professor a nobis nominatus Vice Cancellario nostrae praedictae an instru- 
Academiae pro tempore existenti exbibebit, praestitoque juramento tbeBoyai 
per has praesentes in eundem finem inferius declarando (quod jura- §HSiiaL 
mentiun praedictae nostrae Academiae Vice Cancellarius pro tempore 
existens pro authoritate per has praesentes sibi commissi administrare 
mandatur) statim sine omni mor& per praedictum Vice Cancellarium 
ad idem Professoris munus admittetiu-. Quod quidem tenebit ap pos- TS**^}** 
sidebit per spatium unius anni integri, a die admissionis suae com- one year, 
putandi, si modo tam diu vixerit. 

(2) Volumus praeterea perque has praesentes statuimus et man- 
damus quod juramentum ab unoquoque hujusmodi Professore nostro 
ante admissionem suam ad praedictum mimus praestandum his verbis 
concipietur, scilicet: Ego A, B, nominatus Professor Regius Bistoriae Oath to be 
Modemae juro me JldelUer pro m£0 posse ohservaturum omnes ordina- Profenor. 
tiOTies et statuta munus et officium meum concemerUes^ Sicut Deus me 
adjuvet per Jesum Christum hoc sacro sancto Evangdio annunciatum, 

(3) Volumus praeterea per has praesentes statuimusque et con- fJ^JW^iJv 
cedimus quod Professor noster pro tempore existens habebit et j:ecipiet per annum 
stipendii loco annuani summam quadringentarum librarum bonae et half-yei^y^ 
legalis monetae Magnae Britanniae vel sibi vel suis assignatis ad ^'^^°^- 
Receptum Scaccarii nostri quod Westmonasterii est solvendarum 
aequalibus semestribus solutiouibus, quarum prima fiet ad finem sex 
mensium calendariorum a die admissiom's suae ad idem Professoris 
officium computandorum. 

(4) Volumus praeterea perque has praesentes statuimus jubemus The Pro- 
et mandamus quod praedictus noster Professor duos ad minimum appoint and 
Praeceptores si ve Magistros eliget, et stipendia idonea iisdem suppedi- £»chen or 
tabit in praedict& nostrft Academift. Qui quidem Praeceptores sive SSguages 
Magistri linguas hodieruas ita callebunt, ut tum loquendi timi scri- thib-^iiS£^ 
bendi rationes accurate possint docere, praedictique nostri Professoris ^ fP^^ 
mandatis obtemperabimt, tenebunturque viginti scholares praedictae ^^^ 
nostrae Academiae in Unguis hodiemis gratis erudire. 

Viginti autem hi scholares a nobis de tempore in tempus nomina- To teach 

buntur per Instrumentum manu nostri regi& munitum, a nobis etiam gratia, 
per simile Instrumentum de tempore in tempus pro nostro beneplacito 

amovendi. Horum etiam scholarium unusquisque duos ad minimum larstobe 

annos in praedictft nostri Academic antequam nominandus erit, habe- by tileKing. 

bit completes, (qui quidem anni dierum numero a tempore matricula- E^'^JSSinrt 

tionis uniuscujusque in nostra praedictft Academic computabuntur) ^^^^'^^^ 

imicuique etiam horum scholcurium nostrorum licebit addiscendis sityooanted 

Unguis modemis et Modernae Historiae ut supradictum est eousque cuiatic?. 



190 Regius Professor of Modem History 

MoBtpMB operam dare donee tros annos in Academic nostr& praedictd a tempore 
more as nominationis suae compleverit e^em ut {)riii8 anno8 compiitandi 

ratione observatft nisi citiuA a nobis per Instrumentum manu nostril 

regi& signatum amoveatur. 

The Pro- (5) Volumus praeterea perque has praesentes statuimus et manda- 

give at leaat mus quod praedictus noster Professor semel ad minimum in unoquoque 

fn each term, termiuo inde ab admissione 8u<1 de Modern^ Historic in scholis publicis 

tended^br praedictae nostrae Academiae ad viginti hos nostras scholares aliasque 

S Bciioiara ^"* interfuerint publicam habebit praelectionem. Quibus viginti projv 

!f d^'iJ' terea expresse praecipimus et modo quodam si>eciali mandamus ut 

hisce Professoris nostri lectionibiLs semper interesse meminerint. 

Volumus etiam bencplacitumque nostrum est ut alii etiam scholares in 

dicta no8tr& AcademiA intersint dictis Professoris nostri in Modemd 

Historic praelectionihus publicis eo modo et secundum easdem regulas 

quibus aliis praelectionibus publicis in Academid nostra praedictA 

adesse tenentur. 

The lecturer (6) Volimius praeterea perque has praesentes statuimus et manda- 
of Sebeet mus quod praedictus noster Professor publicas has suas lectiones in- 
on modem cipiat de optimis Historiae Modemae scriptoribus historicam faciendo 
iiistory. narrationem monendoque viginti nostros scholares aliosque qui inter- 

fuerint qu& methodo quibusque authoribus legendis felicissime hisce 
studiis progredi possint. 

The 20 echo- (7) Volumus praeterea perque has praesentes statuimus et manda- 
attend the ™us quod iidem praedicti viginti scholares professorem nostrum prae- 
and'fram ^ dictum tiun euntem ad scholas publicas tum inde redeuntem deducent 
the Schools. ^^ oomitabuntur quotiescunque praedictus noster Professor publicas 

suas de Historic Modemft ut modo mandavimus habebit praelec- 

tiones. 



r to (8) Volumus praeterea perque has praesentes declaramus et man- 
for n^leet damus quod si praedictus noster Professor per spatium uniuscujusvis 
thebti^M^ termini integri ab admissione su& neglexerit aut omiserit in scholis 
hUheUni- publicis praedictae nostrae Academiae de Modern^ Historic publice 
versityare. praelegere, tum et eo in casu praedictus noster Professor ob singulas 
Buas negligentias aut omissiones iisdem poenis pecuniariis subjectus 
erit quibus caeteri Profeasores in praedicti nostra Academic ob similes 
negligentias suas aut omissiones subjiciuntur, praedictaeque poenae in 
nostrum praedictum Modemae Historiae Professorem de tempore in 
tempus elldem authoritate infligentur atque eo modo exigentur eosdem- 
que in usiis erogabuntur ac similes poenae quae in caeteros praedictae 
nostrae Academiae Professores iisdem de causis infliguntur secundum 
leges et statuta quae in praesens vim obtinent in praedictft nostrft 
Academift. Quibus legibus et statutis volumus, statuimus et man- 
damus praedictum nostrum Professorem pro tempore existentem in 
omnibus aliis rebus etiam subjici et teneri. 



Lettei'8 patent of King George IT. 191 

(9) Volumus praeterea perque has praesentes statuimus et man- Care tobe 
damns quod praedictus nosier Professor et praedicti linguamm hodier- thehoun 
narum magistri in praedict& Academic imprimis et praecipue cavebunt and instnac- 
ne tempora aut horae quae ab lis ad erudieudos praedictos viginti deni History 
scholares in Modemd Historic linguisque hodiemis destinabuntur gu||^So 
eadem sint quae per leges Academiae ad alia studia simt designata. ^^)f^^ 

Praeterea quod quivis praedictorum viginti scholarium a nobis eo »ire»df 

modo quo supradictum est nominatorum e Unguis hodiemis duas ad for other 

minimum addiscet et callebit. jg^i^ ^i ^i^^ 

Item quod idem Professor noster praedictique magistri ad unum e JJ^SuoSn 

Principalibus nostris Stat<is Secretariis narrationem quandam pro- »fc»e««ttwo 

gressAs uniuscujunque dictorum scholarium manibus suis subscriptam Reports of 

singulis annis transmittet ut nos certiores facti vol eos si qui fuerint pro^ran^of 

qui studia haecce neglexerint amovere possimus vol diligentiam indus- [j® bJ^^'JJ, 

triamque eorum incitare qui sese aptos utilesque publicis rebus ob- the King, 
eundifl reddiderint domi forisve prout occasio tulerit munus aliquod 
idoneum iis assignando. 

(10) Volumus praeterea perque hasce praesentes declaramus quod These regu- 
hae erunt in praesens l^es nostrae, statuta et ordinationes tam prae- be sabee- 
dictum nostrum Modemae Historiae Professorem spectantes quam cku^^by 
Praeceptores sive Magistros linguarum hodiemarum scholaresque ad ^^^^^^ 
easdem addiscendas nominates; Nobis tamen reservantee potestatem 
pleuam authoritatemque easdem de tempore in tempus prout nobis 
idoneum congruumque visum fuerit mutandi, explicandique per instru- 
mentum manu noetrft regi& sigilloque regio quod vocatur le Privy 

Signet munitum, atque adjiciendi insuper ejusmodi alias leges, statuta 
atque ordinationes quas vel temporum ratio postulaverit vel quas 
progrediente h&c nostr& regi& institutione utiles magis ac necessarias 
fore oonstiterit. 

In cujus rei &c. Teste Meipso apud Westmonasterium vicesimo 
octavo die Septembris anno regni nostri undecimo. Per Breve de 
private dgUloK 



D. Letters patent of King Oeorge the Second^ 1728. 

Rex omnibus ad quos &c. 

Quandoquidem Qeorgius primus nuper rex pater noster beatissimae Preamble 
memoriae, per literas suas patentes sub magno sigillo suo Magnae what ^ 
Britanniae confectas, die vicesimo octavo mensis Septembris anno regni hiMi^ne. 
sui undecimo datas, in Academia sua Cantabrigiae officium sive munus 
Professoris in Modema Historia creaverit, erexerit, ordinaverit, fecerit, 
constituent et stabiliverit, itidemque per praedictas literas patentes 
quasdam leges, ordinationes, statuta atque mandata, tam ad officium 

> From the original m the Registry of the University, Box N, 24. 



192 Regitis Professor of Modern History 

supradictum sive munus Professoris in Modema Historia Praeceptores 
sive Magiatros linguarum hodiemarum, Scholaresque in dictis linguis 
erudiendoB, quam ad nominationem dicti Professoris de tempore in 
tempus per instnimentum manu sua regia signatum, et ad nominatio- 
nem et amotionem eonimdem Soholarium pro beneplacito suo per 
similia instrumenta manu sua regia munita spectantia fecerit, condi- 
derit et sanciverit, uti ex iisdem Uteris patentibus inspectis plenius 
ub^riusque liquere potest. 
The [JH"***" Nos tarn honestum tam laudabile tamque utile dicti patris nostri 
continued, regii institutum plurimum comprobantes volentesque praedictam nos- 
tram Academiam Cantabrigiae hoc quoque favoris nostri regii testi- 
monio omare, quo magis magisque ingenua juventus bonis artibus 
ibidem floreat et varia linguarum etiam hodiemarum cognitione aptius 
commodiusque perpoliatur, officium sive munus Professoris in Modema 
Historia et leges, statuta, ordinationes atque mandata eodem perti- 
nentes, prout in Uteris patentibus nuper patris nostri regii superius 
laudatis s^^eciatim recensentur, in Academia nostra Cantabrigiensi de 
novo erigere et continuare decrevimua 
The Pro- SciATis igitur quod nos de gratia nostra speciaH, certa scientia et 

TeMOiera, mero motu officium sive munus Professoris in Modema Historia de 
Ut8, tobe novo ereximus, constituimus, stabiUvimus et confirmavimus, ac per 
he^fore." hasce praesentes de novo erigimus, constituimus, stabilimus et confir- 
mamus in praedicta Academia nostra Cantabrigiae una cum hujus- 
modi legibus, statutis, ordinationibus atque mandatis, tam ad dictum 
officium sive munus Professoris nostri regii, Praeceptores sive Magis- 
tros linguarum hodiemarum, Scholaresque de tempore in tempus in 
Unguis hodiemis et Modema Historia enidiendos, quam ad nomina- 
tionem dicti Professoris nostri regii pro tempore existentis per instm- 
mentum manu nostra regia signandum, ac ad nominationem et amotio- 
nem eorundem Scholarium pro tempore existentium pro nostro bene- 
placito per similia instrumenta manu nostra regia mimienda spectan- 
tibus, prout in Uteris patentibus supradictis ampUus oontinentur; 
volumusque ulterius ut omnia et singula in praefatis Uteris patentibus 
expressa eamdem vim vigoremque obtineant, ac si a nobis ac in nomine 
nostro regio ab initio ordinata atque instituta fuerint, nobis tamen 
reservantes potestatem plenamque auctoritatem easdem l^es, statuta, 
ordinationes atque mandata de tempore in tempus prout nobis idoneum 
congruumque visum fuerit mi^tandi expUcandique per instrumenta 
manu nostra regia sigilloque regio quod vocatur le Privy Signet 
munita, atque adjiciendi insuper ejusmodi aUas leges, statuta atque 
ordinationes, quas vel tei^porum ratio postulaverit vel quas pro- 
grediente hac nostra regia ^stitutione utiles magis ac necessaiias fore 
constiterit ! 

In cujus rei &c. Tpr.te rege apud Westmonasterium undecimo die 
Aprilis. Per Breve de private sigiUo. 



Lord Almoner's Reader in Arabic 193 



9. Arabic : The Lord Almoner's Reader or Professor. 

1724. 

It is a matter of University tradition that the first Lord 
Almoner who assigned a stipend to a Reader in Arabic was 
Lancelot Blackburn, Bishop of Exeter 1717-24, and Arch- 
bishop of York from 1724 to his death 23 March, 1743; 
and that he appointed David Wilkins to be the first Reader 
in 1724^ 

It is, however, certain that the foundation had been 
projected at an earlier date, for a Royal Warrant, dated 
12 August, 1715, begins as follows: 

An Establishment of certain Annual Pentions and annuities which 
Oiu* Pleasure is shall commence from the 24th day of June, 1714, and 
be paid and accounted payable Quarterly during Our Pleasure.... 
Other Pentions or charities granted or continued by her late Majesty 
Queen Anne. To the Lord Almoner... for an Arabick Professor at 
Oxford and at Cambridge, each 502. — 1002.' 

1 Cooper's AnnaU^ iy. 186. In confirmation of this statement Mr Oooper 
quotes a poem signed S. H., i.e. Samuel Hadderton, Fellow of Trinity 
College and University Librarian, in the ooUeotion entitled Luetus in 
obitum serenUHmi Georgi I [etc.], fol., 1727, sig. G. After praising the 
liberality of George Lewis, Archdeacon of Meath, who had presented a 
coUectiou of Oriental MSS., coins, and curiosities, the writer says : 

'*Jamque Eborum PrsBsul, Tibi, Georgi, oonsulit alter 
Lewisioqne suam jungere gaudet opem.** 

A note upon this passage tells us : ** Arehiep, Eb, qui nunc est, et Regi ab 
Eleemos. applicand. curavit 60 libr. p. Ann, usui Lectoru Ling, Arab, oui 
lingua diseenda multi omnium ordinum nunc gnaviter incumbunt, hoe re 
exeitati.** 

* See an article signed Hubert Hall in The Atkenteum, 16 Nov. 1889, 
p. 678. In tbe Eyidence addressed to Her Majesty's Commissioners, 1860, 
p. 92, the Lord Almoner's Professor states: **In answer to my inquiries 
addressed to the Almonry Office, I am informed by the Secretary, that after 
a careful search he finds only that in the year 1724 the two Professors (one 
in each University) were in the payment of that office, under the authority 
of the Lord Almoner ; and that there are no records whatever anterior to 
that year, nor anything to show their origin." 

c. 18 



194 Professor of Botany 

The appointment is made by the Lord Almoner for the 
time being. The following extracts from one of the Patents 
of OflBce will be found interesting : 

To all Christian People to whom these presents shall come, The... 
Lord High Almoner to the Queen's Most ExceUent Majesty, Greeting. 

Enow ye that by virtue of my said office of High Almoner, I have 
nominated constituted and appointed... A. B. to be Professor and 
Lecturer of the Arabic Language in the... University [of Cambridge]... 
and I do as far as in me lies authorize the said A. B. to receive possess 
and enjoy the salary or stipend issuing and payable out of the Lord 
High Almoner's Office and hitherto customarily paid to the Professor 
and Lecturer of the Arabic Language in the said University for the 
time being.... 

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my Hand and Seal of my 
said Office of Lord High Almoner.... 

The salary is £60, less fees, paid direct to the Professor 
by the Lord Almoner. 



10. Botany. 
1724. 

The first Professor of Botany was elected by the following 
Grace, which passed the Senate 10 November, 1724: 

Cum Ricardus Bradley, Societatis Regalis Londinensis Socius, in 
re Herbaria se peritissimum exhibuerit, atque in horto Botanico 
instruendo et ezomando et sumptus et operam impendere spoponderit 
in summum hujus AcademiaB commodum decusque 

Placeat Yobis ut professoris Botanici titulum honoris ergo apud 
vos consequatur^ 

On Bradley's death, 5 November, 1732, the Senate 
decided (Grace 23 January, 1732-33) that another person 
should be elected in his room*; and John Martyn, who 
had entered at Emmanuel College in 1730, was chosen 
(8 February, 1732-33) by the Senate, more burgensium^ 
After his resignation, 18 November, 1761, his son Thomas 

* Grace Book I, p. 122. 

> Ibid. p. 835. The words used are ; Plaoeat Yobis ut alius ad idem 
munus exeqaendom a Yobis eligatur, P Ibid. p. 336. 



Professor of Botany 196 

Martyn, M.A., Fellow of Sidney Sussex College, was elected 
in the same manner, 2 February, 1762^ In 1793 (13 Sept.) 
he received a patent from King George the Third, with an 
annual salary of £200*. Martyn died 3 June, 1825. 

These three elections had taken place without previous 
nomination by the Heads of Colleges, and, in anticipation 
of Martyn's death, a legal opinion was taken (in 1816) as to 
what course ought to be pursued in the future, especially in 
view of the fact that in the patent the Professor was styled 
by the Crown " our public Professor or Reader of Botany." 
Counsel advised that no change of procedure was necessary*. 

On Martyn's death John Stevens Henslow, M.A. Joh., 
and three other persons came forward as candidates, but 
no election was held, as the difficulty about the right of 
nomination (see Mineralogy) had not been settled. He 
however received a patent from the Crown, dated 26 July, 
1825, in virtue of which he became King's Reader*. 

In 1867 (13 December) the Senate accepted a new statute 
for the Professorship, which provided that in ftiture the 
Professor should be chosen by the persons whose names are 
on the Electoral Roll of the University. This statute was 
confirmed by the Queen in Council 16 April, 1861. It has 
since been repealed. 

The Professor's stipend was raised to £300 a year by 
Grace 30 May, 1861, confirming a report of a Syndicate 
appointed "to consider what Professorships should receive 
an additional Stipend." 

The Professorship is now governed by Statute B. 

1 Grace Book K, p. 358. 

> A oopj of the patent is in the Registry, Vol. xzxix. 16. 2. The Dnke 
of Grafton had signified his wiUingnef 8 to procure this in 1771, but went oat 
of office before the matter could be completed. Gorham*s LiveM of the 
Martyns, p. 140. The payment of this salary devolved upon the University 
in 1857 (see above, p. 181). 

> This opinion is in the Begistiy, Vol. xxxix. 16. 8. 
* Ibid. Vol xxxix. 16. 7». 



13—2 



196 Woodwa/rdicm Professor of Oeology 

11. Geology (John Woodward). 
1727. 

John Woodward, M.D.^ by Will dated 1 October, 1727 
(A), directed his executors to buy, and convey to the Uni- 
versity of Cambridge, an estate which should produce £160 
a year, out of which sum £100 was to be paid to a Lecturer 
who should expound such of Dr Woodward s doctrines as 
he thought proper to select. He also bequeathed to the 
University two cabinets of English fossils marked A, B, 
with their catalogues. 

Dr Woodward died 25 April, 1728, and in the following 
September the two cabinets reached Cambridge, but the 
first Professor, Conyers Middleton, D.D., was not elected 
until 13 July, 1731, The new foundation was not accepted 
by Grace, but the University was evidently well aware of its 
importance, for by Grace, 26 February, 1728-29, they agreed 
to purchase for a sum not exceeding £1000 the two other 
cabinets mentioned in the Will, containing respectively 
foreign fossils and additional English fossils. In 1731 the 
executors bought an estate of the required value near Beccles 
in Suffolk; and in 1734 the University provided accommoda- 
tion for the cabinets by cutting off from the north end of the 
Arts School a space about fifteen feet in length, now the 
Novel Room of the Library. 

In 1857 (15 December) the University accepted a new 
statute for the Professorship, which was confirmed by the 
Queen in Council, 16 April, 1861 «. 

A. Extract from the Will of John Woodward. 

In the name of God Amen. I John Woodward, Doctor of Physic 
and Professor of the same in Gresham College in London... do make 
and ordain this my last Will and Testament in manner and form 
following that is to say : 

^ He received this degree by diploma from the Abp. of Canterbaiy 4 Feb. 
1694-5, and was admitted to the same at Cambridge by Grace 28 June, 
1696, when he became a member of Pembroke College. The diploma is in 
the Beglstiy, Box M. 1. For fmrther information respecting Woodward and 
his benefaction see Life of Sedgwick, i. pp. 166—188. 

* Statutes, ed. 1896, p. 98. 



Will of Dr John Woodward 



197 



Imprimis I resign my Soul into the merciful Hands of Gkxi who 
gave it, and my Body unto the Earth to be buried by my Executors 
herinafter named in the Abbey Church of Westminster, desiring that 
my Funeral be with as little Pomp and Expences as may well be. 

Item, I give devise and bequeath to my said Executors. . .all my House- 
hold Goods my Roman Urns Lamps and other Antiquities my foreign 
Fossils in my Cabinet marked Letter D, and my additional English 
Fossils in my Cabinet marked Letter C; and the said two Cabinets 
with the Catalogues of the said Fossils that I have drawn up and also 
all my Books, Jewels, and Plate, my ready money my money in the 
South Sea Company... an^ all other my Personal Estate of what Nature 
kind or Quality soever (except my two Cabinets marked A and B 
herinafter otherwise given and bequeathed) in special trust that they 
employ and dispose of the same for the performance of this my Will 
provided nevertheless that if my said Executors shall not think proper 
to sell my Foreign Fossils and additional English Fossils in my said two 
Cabinets marked D and C then my Will is that in such case they shall 
and may have power and authority to give away the same or cause 
them to be reposited and kept in such place and manner as they 
shall think fitting...^. 

My Will is, that my Executors, so soon as conveniently may be, 
do purchase lands, tenements, and hereditaments in fee-simple, scituate 
lying and being in some good part of South Britain, of the yearly 
value of one hundred and fifty pounds ; and that after such purchase 
made, they do convey and assure the same to and upon the University 
of Cambridge : I mean, the Chancellor Masters and Scholars of that 
University, for ever, in such manner and form, and by such proper 
terms and conveyances, as coimsel learned in the law shall for that 
purpose advise and direct. 

The sum of one hundred poimds thereout to be paid yearly and 
every year to a Lecturer, to be chosen, for the purposes herein-after 
specified, by my executors, the survivors or survivor of them ; and 
from and after their decease, by the Lord Archbishop of the Province 
in which the said University of Cambridge is, who, it is to be presumed, 
besides his favouring of learning and all useful knowledge, will think 
himself under obligation to have special regard to this University ; and, 
for still the same reason, by the Lord Bishop of the Diocese in which 
the said University is, by the President of the Collie of Physicians, 
and by the President of the Royal Society of London, by the two 
Representatives, or Members from time to time elected and serving in 
Parliament for the said University, by the whole Senate, (that is to 
say) the Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor of that University, the 



Dispodtion 
of bis oollec- 
tions, and 
espectaUy 
hlBcabineta 
off Old]!. 



Lftndfl of 150 
pounds per 
Ann. to oe 
porcfaaaed 
andoon- 
veyed to the 
Unlvenity: 



of wUch 100 
pounds to 
the Lec- 
turer. 

Lecturer to 
be chosen 
by the Ex- 
ecutors, and 
afterwards 
by the Ardb- 
bishop, etc 



^ In the omitted clauses the testator gives directions for the sale of his 
household goods etc., the payment of debts and legacies, and the collection 
of money due to him. 



198 



Will of Dr John Woodward 



ArehUahop, 
Bishop, 
Chanoellor, 
two Presi- 
dents, and 
Memoeis of 
Parliunent 
m*7 Yote b7 
proxj. 



Lecturer to 
be chosen 
within two 
months 
slteresch 
vacancy. 



To be a 



Layman be 
preferred to 
a Divine. 



Lec tm ei s to 
be subject to 
orders. 



To have no 
other prefer- 
ment 



Provosts Masters and Heads of the several Colleges and Halls for 
the time being ; the Doctors, Masters of Arts, and all who have a right 
of voting for Members of Parliament, representing the said University ; 
or a majority of the above specified illustrious and excellent persons : 
And it is my request to them, that in consideration of the benefit 
which may thence accrue to the publick, they will be pleased to take 
upon them the care and guardianship hereof; and that they will 
make choice only of such men for reading the Lectures herein-after 
specified and directed, as have distinguished themselves by their virtue 
their learning judgment and great abilities. And in case it shall happen 
that by reason of age, sickness, or absence from the University, the 
said Archbishop, Bishop, Chancellor, or either of the two Members of 
Parliament, or of the two Presidents above-mentioned, cannot be 
present and give their attendance at the time that any election is 
to be made, it is my will and intention that any of these electors, 
so absent, may appoint a proxy to assist and give a vote at that 
election. 

And I Will that the first Lecturer be chosen as soon as may well be 
after my decease, and that all the succeeding Lecturers be from time 
to time chosen after each vacancy or removal of the predecessor or 
former Lecturer, within the space of two months at furthest ; the Vice- 
chancellor causing publick notice to be timely given by billets fixed 
up in the Publick Schools, and by advertisements printed in the 
Gassette, or some other like authentick publick newspaper. 

And my Will is that none be chose but Batchellours, or men that 
have not been married, and that in case of the marriage of any of the 
said Lecturers afterwards, his election shall be thereby immediately 
made void, lest the care of a wife and children should take the Lecturer 
too much from study, and the care of the Lecture. 

And my Will further is, that if a Divine shall at any time happen 
to be Competitor with a Layman for this Lectureship, in case the 
latter shall be as well qualified, he shall ever have preference of the 
former ; not out of any disrespect to the Clez^ (for whom I have ever 
had a particular r^ard), but because there is in this kingdom better 
provision, and a much greater number of Preferments for the Clergy, 
than for men of learning among the laity. 

And my Will is, that all such Lecturers shall from time to time 
be further subject to such rules orders and directions (not interfering 
with those herein-after particiilarly specified and sett forth) as the 
electors, or a majority of them shall from time to time think fitt to 
make. 

And my Will is, that no one shall at any time be chosen Lecturer 
who then hath any Preferment, Office or Post whatever that shall any 
ways so employ and take up his time as to interfere with his duty 
herein sett forth, and in particular that shall require his attendance out 
of the University. And in case any of the Lecturers after he is chosen 



Will of Dr John Woodward 199 

shall accept of any such Preferment Office or Post, his election shall be 
thereby made void, and another chosen in his roouL 

And it is further my intent and meaning, and I do hereby will and Mart xedde, 
order, that such Lecturer from time to time so to be appointed and abientftboTa 
chosen by my executors the survivors and survivor of them, so long as in the long 
they or any of them shall be living, and afterwards to be chosen by a ^■***°°' 
majority of those excellent and illustrious persons above-mentioned, 
shall reside in the said University of Cambridge and never be absent 
from the same above the space of two months in the year, and those to 
be in the long Vacation in the summer. 

And that the said Lecturer shall there read four Lectures every MmtrHMl 
year, at such times and in such place of the said University as tmeyezj 
the majority of the said electors shall appoint, on some one or other Sffi^^^ 
of the subjects treated of in my Natural History of the Earth, my P*»*^ 
DefeTice of it against Dr, CamerariuSy my Discourse of Vegetation^ or my 
State of Phyncky at his discretion ; but in such language, ^^iz. English 
or Latin, as shall be appointed from time to time by the Chancellor 
Vice-chancellor Provosts and Masters of the several Colleges and Halls 
belonging to the said University ; the said Lectures, or at least one of 
them, at the Lecturer's own free choice and election, to be published in 
print every year. 

Item I give and bequeath my original Collection of English Fossils Two Oabi- 
contaiued in two of my Cabinets marked with the several letters A and A and B 
£, and also the said two Cabinets with the Catalogues of the said SniTenitjf 
Fossils which I have drawn up; to the said University of Cambridge. 
And my Will is, that as soon as may well be after my Decease, my 
executors or the survivor of them, do cause and procure the same to be 
lodged and reposited in such proper Room or Apartment as shall be 
allotted by the said University, to the satisfaction of my executors or 
the survivor of them. And my Will further is, that the said Lecturer The Leo- 
from time to time to be chosen, shall have the care and custody of all tSe^Bustody* 
the said Fossils, and the catalogues of them, and that he do live and to^^'u^ 
reside in or near the said Apartment so to be allotted for repositing nStfiS^* 
the said Fossils as above-mentioned in the said University ; and that JJl^J**^^ 
he be actually ready and attending in the Room where they are reposited, ^^ s l>»7« 
from the hour of nine of the clock in the morning to eleven, and again gnUa. 
from the hour of two in the afternoon till four, three days in every week 
(except during the two months in the long Vacation, wherein he is 
allowed to be absent as above-mentioned) to shew the said Fossils 
gratis, to all such curious and intelligent persons as shall desire a 
view of them for their information and instruction ; and that he himself 
shall be always present when they are shewn, and take care that none 
of the said Fossils be mutilated or lost 

And I request and desire the said Chancellor Vice-Chancellor 
Provosts and Masters of the several Colleges and Halls, or a majority 
of them, that before the admission of every Lecturer, and likewise 



200 



Will of Dr John Woodtvard 



Twolmpeo- 
tora to ex- 
amine onoe 
a Tear the 
coilection of 
Fossils, of 
which cata- 
logues to be 
kept in the 
PobUcLi- 
biary. 



The Inspee- 
torstohaye 
five pounds 
apiece for 
their paina 



Lecturer 

mustgiye 

secuntj. 



To be allow- 
ed 10 pounds 
per ann. for 
experi- 
ments, 
correspond- 
ences, &cl 



Accountable 
to the elec- 
tors for it 



Ten pounds 
per ann. for 
a dinner first 
of May. 



The re- 
mainder to 
pay taxes, 
&c. to the 
use of the 
University. 



afterwards once every year, they do appoint two discreet and careful 
persons who shall inspect and examine the said Collections of Fossils, 
and compare them with the catalogues ; of which I will, that besides 
those to be kept by the Lecturer, there be copies reposited in the 
Publick Library of the said University, for greater security that the 
said Fossik be preserved with great care and faithfulness; and that 
the said two persons to be appointed to inspect and examine the same, 
shall give under their hands a report of their examination thereof, their 
comi^aring them with the said catalogues, and the state and condition 
in which they are kept, and whether any of them are lost or mutilated ; 
for which their care and trouble, I desire and direct that five pounds 
apiece be annually paid them out of the said estate in fee above directed 
to be piuxshased and conveyed to the uses and trusts of this my Will. 

And to the end that the said Fossils may be preserved and kept 
with the greater care and faithfulness, it is my will that the Lecturer 
and keeper of them from time to time shall before his admission give 
such security as my executors and the survivor of them, and after the 
decease of such survivor, the succeeding electors shall think proper. 

And I further will that the sum of ten pounds shall be yearly and 
every year paid to the Lecturer above-mentioned, out of the rents of 
the said estate in fee, to be laid out and employed by him, from time 
to time, in making observations and experiments, keeping corre- 
spondence with learned men on the subjects directed to be treated 
of in the Lectures, and in procuring additions to the Collections of 
Fossils, or in which of them each Lecturer for the time being shall 
think fitt ; he rendering annually to such of the electors as shall be in 
the University an o,cco\int in writing in which of the ways the said 
sum of ten pounds hath been disbursed and employed. 

And I further will and direct, that out of the annual rents of the 
said estate in fee, the sum of ten pounds annually for ever be appro- 
priated and allowed for a Dinner on the first day of May ; or if this 
fall on a Sunday, then on the second day of May, for the said Lecturer, 
two Inspectors or Examiners, and the said Chancellor Vice-Chancellor 
Provosts and Masters of the Colleges and Halls of the said Uni- 
versity; to the end that they may then confer and consider of the 
methods to improve the design and use of the said donation by me 
hereby made. And I greatly wish that these things that are of so 
much use and importance, and which I have with great diligence and 
expence collected, may by this settlement, the care of the electors, and 
the dihgence of the Lecturer, be made serviceable to the setting forth 
the wisdom of Gkxl in the works of Nature; to the advancement of 
Tiseful knowledge, and to the profit and benefit of the pubUck. 

And it is my further will and intention, that the surplus and 
residue of the annual rents of the said estate in fee, after the salary 
to the Lecturer, the ten pounds per annum to the two inspectors or 
examiners, the ten pounds per annum for correspondence and experi- 



WiU of Dr John Woodward 201 

ments, and the ten pounds per annum for the dinner first paid and 
satisfied ; I say that all the surphis and residue of the said annual 
rents shall go and belong to the said University for ever, for the pay- 
ment of taxes, or any other necessary contingencies that may happen. 
But in case any surplus should remain, after such taxes and contin- 
gencies paid, that then such surplus be disposed of yearly and every 
year, in such manner as the said University shall think fit ; but in 
hopes, that for the honour of the University, and the benefit that will 
thence accrue to the publick, if the design of this donation be rightly 
carried on, that the said University will be pleased to dispose of the 
said residue in making experiments and observations, in correspondence, 
in natural collections, books, or other things that may serve to the 
promoting the good ends of this donation. But in case the taxes if the taxee 
should at any time amount to more than the said sum of twenty 30 pounds 
pounds, being the residue of the said sum of one hundred and fifty ES^t^Vto" 
pounds hereby bequeathed to the said University; then my will and Jf^^***^"" 
intention is, that the Lecturer shall pay such overplus of the said 
taxes out of his said salary. 

And further it is my will and intention, that any Lecturer not Jp^f"'*' . , 
doing his duty, and acquitting himself rightly to their satisfaction, datjreinoy- 
shall be removable at the discretion of the electors or the majority 
of them, and another chosen in his place ; his salary to commence 
from the quarter-day next ensuing the death or removal of his 
predecessor. 

And I do hereby will order and direct that the above-mentioned Lecturer to 
salary of one hundred pounds per annum, herein-before limited and quArterij. 
appointed as a provision for the said Lecturer, be paid and satisfied 
to him from time to time by four even quarterly payments, at and 
upon the four usual feast days or days of payment in the year (that 
is to say) ; the Feast of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary^ 
the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist^ the Feast of Saint Michael the 
Archangel, and the Nativity of Christ; and in case of default of 2^*P^** 
payment of the said sum of one hundred pounds per annum for his monthi may 
salary, and the sum of ten poimds per annum, for the uses above- 
mentioned out of the said lands or estate so purchased and conveyed 
as above specified, to the Lecturer to whom it shall become due, by 
the space of six months, after any of the days of payment whereon it 
is directed to be paid as aforesaid, it shall and may be lawful for that 
Lecturer to distrain for such arrears of his said salary ; and if there be 
not sufi&cient by such distress, to pay himself the said arrears, that he 
shall and may sue for them, and enter upon the said estate settled for 
support of the Lecturer, and hold and keep the same till his arrears be 
paid, or till he accept another place or office, or be absent from the 
University, or neglect to read or print the Lectures as is herein for 
that purpose particularly specified. 

And as to my own private writings and manuscripts relating to the What is to 



202 Lowndean Professor of 

be done with natural history of the Earth, to Physic and all other subjects that 
wmvd's Mss. I have written upon, I should have been greatly pleased that the times 
had favoured and my Fortunes and Affairs permitted me to have 
finished and published them in order to which I have so long studied 
and laboured with the utmost diligence and faithfulness ; but as things 
have fallen out I can now only leave them to bo disposed of bj my 
executors in such manner as they in their discretion shall think fit. 
Dublklu^^^ But for such others of my writings as I have at any time in my 
works. life caused to be published the property and copyright of all which 

is in myself and also all such others of my writings as my executors 
may hereafter appoint to be printed I say of all those and these I do 
give and devise one moiety of the said property and copyright and the 
benefit and profit thence arising to the said University and the other 
moiety to the said Lecturer and his successors from time to time upon 
this special trust and confidence that the said University and the said 
Lecturer and their successors do take care that all my said works 
whether published in my lifetime or afterwards from time to time be 
printed as soon as the former edition of the same or of any part is sold 
off or become scarce.... 

And I do order and direct that so soon as the lands [etc.] be 
purchased and conveyed to the above mentioned uses of this my Will 
the deeds of purchase and conveyance thereof shall be enrolled in 
Chancery with proper descriptions by words and by proper plans 
or draughts, of each parcel of the said estate and that the Title 
deeds and ancient writings and evidences which concern the said 
estate shall likewise be deposited in Chancery and attested copies of all 
and every of them be lodged and kept in the said Publick Library of the 
said University^.... 



12. Astronomy and Geometry (Thomas Ix)wndes). 

1748. 

Thomas Lowndes, of Overton in Cheshire, by Will dated 
6 May, 1748, made the following bequest: 

Annnai rent -••! give and devise all my Estate at Overton, and all my lands and 
tobe^pS^to hereditaments in Smallwood and elsewhere in the county of Chester, 
Profenor. ^^^ ^\ other my real estate, unto the Chancellor, Masters, and Scholars 
of the University of Cambridge, and their successors for ever,... upon 
trust that they shall for ever pay all the clear rents and profits of my 
said real estates annually to the support and maintenance of a Professor 
of Astronomy and Geometry in the said University of Cambridge, after 

1 From ** a true copy '' in the Begistry of the Univeraity, Vol. zzxiz. 17. 1. 



mortgage. 



Astronomy and Oeomelry 208 

deducting thereout all costs, charges, and expenses of executing the 
said trust hereby in them reposed, and all taxes, repairs, and other 
outgoings. 

Which Professor I will shall be for ever called Lowndes' Astro- Name, 
nomical and Qeometrical Professor in the University of Cambridge, 
and shall be from time to time chosen and appointed by the Lord High Mode of 
Chancellor or Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of Qreat Britain, the 
Lord President of the Privy Council, the Lord Privy Seal, the Lord 
High Treasurer, or the First Lord Commissioner of the Treasury, the 
Lord Steward of the King's Household for the time being, or the major 
part of them. 

And I will and desire that proper statutes, rules, and ordinances in statutei. 
relation to the said Professorship, and the number of the lectures to be 
read therein, and the times for such reading, and all other regulations 
for the perpetual government of the said Professorship, shall be made 
by and under the hands and seals of the Right Honourable [George]^ 
Earl of Macclesfield, Martin Folkes, Esq., President of the Royal Society, 
Dr. Bradley, and my much-honoured friend William Jones, Esq., of 
Beaufort-buildings ; which statutes and ordinances shall be for ever 
binding to the said Professors.... 

And I will that the first money that can be got from the contract I Diaofaarge of 
now have depending with the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty 
for meliorating Brine Salt shall be applied to satisfye a mortgage on 
my said real estate, now due to M** Bridget Clayton, and all other 
moneys due from me to her... In witness whereof I have hereunto set 
my hand and seal this 6^ day of May 1748*. 

Mr Lowndes died 12 May, 1748. The Senate did not 
formally accept his benefaction by Grace, but their action 
in deciding (1 March, 1749-50) to defend a suit in Chancery 
brought against the University by the heirs-at-law*, implies 
acceptance of the new Professorship. 

Mr Lowndes had been much interested in the production 
of Brine Salt, which, he alleged, could be made by his 
process, of equally good quality, and at a &r cheaper rate 
than French bay salt; and he had obtained assurance from 

^ In the two copies of the Will in the Registry Thomas Earl of Maccles- 
field is mentioned, but this is clearly a mistake, as be died 28 April, 1732, 
sixteen years before the Will was drawn ; and further, in the statutes 
printed below, his son, George Earl of Macclesfield, describes himself as one 
of those appointed to prepare statutes. 

> From tbe copy of the WiU in the Registry marked 19* in Vol. xzzix. 18. 

* Grace Book K, p. 126. A large number of documents relating to 
Mr Lowndes' estates is in the Registry of the University. 



204 Lowndean Professor of 

the Admiralty, moved by a petition presented by him to the 
House of Commons, and favourably received, that if his salt 
stood certain tests, he should receive a substantial reward in 
money ; but his death took place before all the trials which 
he had himself suggested could be made. 

In or about 1757 Dr Roger Long, Mr Lowndes' first 
Professor, petitioned the House of Commons to the effect 
that as the Government had obtained considerable advantage 
fi-om Mr Lowndes* discovery it would be proper to acknow- 
ledge their obligation to him by freeing his estate from the 
mortgage referred to in the Will. The House agreed to the 
following Vote, 19 March, 1759 : 

That a Sum not exceeding One Thousand Two Hundred and Eighty 
Poiinds be granted to his Majesty, to be paid to Roger Long, D.D., 
Lovyndedi Astronomical and Geometrical Professor in the University of 
Cambridge^ without Account, to enable him to discharge, in Pursuance 
of the Will of Thomas Lottmdes, Esquire (the Inventor of a Method for 
meliorating the Brine Salt of this Kingdom) a Mortgage upon an 
Estate devised for the Endowment of the said Professorship, by the 
said Thomas LowndeSy and to reimburse to the said Roger Long the 
Interest Monies he hath paid, and that are growing due, and the 
Expences he hath incurred in respect of the said Mortgage, and that 
the same be paid without Fee or Reward. 

As Dr Long urges in his petition, among the arguments 
for granting his prayer, that the University "may be put in 
fiill possession of the estate devised to their Benefit, and the 
Title Deeds thereof safely lodged among their Archives"; 
and as the deeds are now in the Registry of the University, 
it may be concluded that the mortgage was discharged by 
the State*. 

The Will directs that statutes for the Professorship are 
to be prepared by certain named persons. It appears from 
the only copy of such statutes which has been preserved (A) 
that the duty which should have been discharged by the whole 
body, had been so long deferred that it devolved upon the sole 
survivor, George Earl of Macclesfield. The statutes are un- 
dated, but it is not difficult to discover the period of their 

^ The docamenta relating to this a£fair are in the Registry, Vol. xzziz. 18. 



Astronomy and Oeometry 205 

composition. Of the persons named, William Jones died 
3 July, 1749; Martin Folkes 28 June, 1754; and James 
Bradley 13 July, 1762. As the Earl himself died 17 March, 
1764, it follows that the statutes must have been written 
in the time that intervened between the death of Bradley and 
that date. 

A new statute for the Professorship was accepted by the 
Senate in 1857; and was approved in its present form by 
the Queen in Council 7 March, 1860\ 



A. Stdtutes made by Oeorge, Earl of Macclesfield. 

Whereas Thomas Lowndes, Esq', by his last Will and Testament 
did found a professorship of Astronomy and Geometry in the Uni~ 
versity of Cambridge, and did direct that Statutes for the same should 
be made by the Right Hon^*« George Earl of Macclesfield, Martin 
Folkes Esq' then President of the Royal Society, James Bradley D.D. 
Royal Astronomer at Greenwich, and William Jones Esq'. ; and whereas 
the settling the said Statutes has been hitherto omitted; lest the 
good intent of the Founder should be frustrated, I, George Earl of 
Macclesfield, now the only survivor of the above mentioned Persons, do 
constitute and appoint the following Statutes to be observed by every 
Person who shall hereafter be elected Lowndes's Professor of Astronomy 
and Geometry in the said University : 

L The Person elected to be Professor shall within one Calendar 
Month after he shall be chosen repair to the University and exhibit to 
the Vice Chancellor the Instrument of his Election, and promise to 
observe the following statutes : 

1. To reside the major Part of each Term, or two whole Terms BMidenoe 
every Year in the University, and therein to read yearly one Course of lJ^uiw. 
Astronomy consisting of at least 20 Lectures, explaining the Motions 

of the Sun, Moon, Planets, Comets and Stars, the Doctrine of Eclipses, 
Physical Causes of the Planetary Motions, Phsenomena of the Tides, 
and such other Things as have Relation to Astronomy. And also to 
read one Course of Geometrical Lectures in every Year, not less than 
20 in Number, upon Euclid, Archimedes, ApoUonius or some modem 
Geometrical Author; explain the Principles of Plain and Solid Geo- 
metry, Trigonometry, the Conic Sections, &c. upon pain of Forfeiture 
of Twenty Shillings for every Lecture omitted. 

2. To give Public Notice a week or ten days before of the Time Toclya 
and Place of Reading, and print a Sylabus of the Heads of the Lectures Lec^^ 
to be read. ^SaC*' 

1 Statutes, ed. 1896, p. 94. 



.206 Jack8onian Professor of 

The Pro- 3. To provide before the end of the first year after his election a 

pro?d?M- good Clock and a Meridian Telescope, with other Astronomical Instni- 
tro^nical j^iexitR (if not before provided) proper for observing the Transits of the 
SS?'o£«. ^^' ^^°» *^^ Planets, Eclipses of the Sun Moon and Satellits of 
vations. Jupiter, and the Places of Comets, under the Penalty of Fifty Poimds 
to be deducted out of that years Salary. And with those Instruments 
to observe as many of such Phsenomena as can be seen at Cambridge 
for 6 weeks in every year, together with a competent Number of 
^ti^Tto Transits of fixt Stars: the Observations to be deposited in the Uni- 
iSiif '***** *d '^^^^^y Library, and a Copy thereof to be sent by the Professor to the 
tent to ' Royal Society within 6 Months after the end of the year wherein the 
Bodetj. Observations were made, upon Pain of forfeiting Twenty Pounds for 
every year such Observations shall not be made and commimicated to 
the Royal Society as aforesaid. All the forfeitures to be applyed to the 
use of the University Library for purchasing Books of Astronomy and 
Geometry. 
bou'Stobe ^' ^\xoh. Instruments as shall be purchased by any Professor to 
blB pilyate belong to his Executors, except he gives them to the Professorship. 
A depatj ^' ^^ ^'^ Professor be disabled by age or infirmity he may appoint 

^owed. ^ Deputy who shall perform the several Parts of the Duty above re- 
quired ^ 



13. Natural and Experimental Philosophy 

(Richard Jackson). 

1783. 

This Professorship was founded by the Reverend Richard 
Jackson, formerly Fellow of Trinity College. He proceeded 
B.A. 1727-8, M.A. 1731. 

By his Will (A), dated 20 February, 1775, to which is 
appended a codicil dated 5 July, 1781, he appoints the 
Master and Fellows of Trinity College trustees for the 
administration of his estate, and the division of the rent 
between the Head Gardener of the Botanic Garden, and the 
Lecturer, Professor, or Demonstrator*. The document also 
prescribes the mode of election of the Professor, the number 
of lectures to be given, and, in a scheme appended to the 

1 Registry of the University, Vol. xxxix. 18. 82». 

' This benefaction has not been placed among the "Foundations with more 
than one object *' (Sect, rr) because it is eyidentthat the testator intended the 
gardener of the Physic Garden to assist the Professor in his researches. 



NaJburcH and EocperimerUal Philosophy 207 

Will, the nature of the experiments which Mr Jackson wished 
to have undertaken. Mr Jackson was buried 15 September, 
1782; and a Syndicate was appointed 7 December, in the 
same year, to decide what the Will meant, and whether it 
would be to the advantage of the University to accept the 
devised They reported in fevour of acceptance, and a Grace 
passed the Senate 21 February, 1783, asking the Master 
and Fellows of Trinity College to proceed to carry out the 
testator's wishes*. 

The first Professor, Isaac Milner, M.A., Queens' College, 
was elected 11 December, 1783; and in the following year, 
26 May, 1784, a Syndicate was appointed "to erect a building 
wherein the Professor of Botany and the Jacksonian Professor 
may deliver public lectures." This building, the lecture 
room on the east side of the old Botanic Garden, lately pulled 
down, was completed in 1787'. 

A new statute, making the Electoral Boll the electors, 
and repealing the directions about lectures etc., passed the 
Senate 15 December, 1857. A similar statute, drawn by the 
Commissioners, was confirmed by the Queen in Council, 
16 April, 1861*. Part of this has since been repealed*. The 
pajnnent of the salary allowed by the Crown (£100) devolved 
upon the University after 1867*. 

In 1875, after the death of Professor Willis, the Council 
of the Senate issued a Beport recommending that the next 
Professor should be a member of the Board of Natural Science 
Studies instead of the Board of Mathematical Studies, as 
heretofore, and that his stipend should be raised to £500 a 
year^. This Beport having been confirmed by Grace 
18 March, 1875, an agitation was set on foot in the University 
which ended in the decision that the next Professor should 
be a chemist. In accordance with this view James Dewar 
was elected without opposition, 13 April, 18751 In future, 
the Professor will be elected under the provisions of Statute B, 
Chapter XV. 

1 Grace Book A, p. 132. > Ibid. p. 184. 

» Arch. Hut, iii. 152, 168. < Statutef, ed. 1882, p. 111. 

• Ibid. ed. 1896, p. 99. « See above, pp. 181, 182. 

7 Reporter, 9 March, 1876, p. 263. » Ibid. 20 April, p. 29. 



208 WUl of the Bev. Richard Jackson 



IfaBterftnd 
Fellows 
ofTrlnltj 
College to 
betnuteee. 



One fifth of 
the rent! to 
bepftidto 
the Head 
Oardener of 
the Phjric 
Garden; the 
resttoa 
Lecturer or 
Professor of 
Natural 
Philosophj. 



How the 
Lecturer 
is to be 
chosen. 



A. Will of the Rev. Rich, Jackson, 1775. 

lu the Name of God this is the last Will and Testament of me 
Richard Jackson .... 

I hereby give, devise, and bequeath all that my Freehold Estate 
at Upper Longsdon, in the parish of Leek, and County of Stafford,... 
to the Master Fellows and Scholars of Trinity College, within the 
Town and University of Cambridge, of King Henry the Eighth's 
foundation, their heirs and successors for ever in and for the Trusts 
herein mentioned... > [They] shall divide the [rents] (the necessary 
expense of collecting the same being first deducted) into five equal 
parts, and pay one-fifth part of the same to the Head or chief Gardener 
of the University Physic Garden there for the time being, and shall 
pay the remainder, without deduction, except the necessary charge 
of collecting, to a Lecturer, Professor, or Demonstrator of Natural 
Philosophy in the said University, on his bringing a certificate, signed 
by eight scholars at least, who have attended his Lectures for twenty 
days out of sixty, that he has duly gone through a course of Demon- 
strations, Exhibitions and Lectures, according to the articles set forth 
in a schedule hereto annexed. 

And my Will is that such Header or Professor be chose by the 
Regent Masters of Arts only of the University who have been resident 
there for the greater part of the year previous to the day of election, 
(excepting only such Masters of Arts as are imder one year's standing, 
who may vote though they have not been resident for that term); 
which said Regent Masters, on notice given to them by the said Master 
Fellows and Scholars aforesaid (or any of them) of this my devise, shall 
assemble pubhcly on some day to be fixed by the Master of Trinity College 
or the Vice-Master, in some of the public buildings belonging to the said 
University, or in the Hall or Chapel of Trinity College aforesaid, or the 
open Court there, and within one month after such notice given to 
them, by the said Master Fellows and Scholars or any of them, by fixing 
up a writing on the School-doors, the doors of St Marys Church, the door 
of the Regent House, or any of them, and shall by Poll, to be taken by 
the Proctors for the time being, or if they or either of them be absent, 
then by the two Junior Regent Masters then present (neither of whom 
is candidate for the office of Lecturer) chuse by majority of votes, given in 
writing, imder the hand of each voter, to the Proctors or Junior R^ents 
aforesaid, such person as they shall in their own proper judgments 
look upon to be best qualified by his knowledge in Natural Experi- 



1 In the omitted portion the testator gives directions about the letting of 
his iarm, and makes certain specific bequests, which are to be paid by 
annual increments. The Will is printed in extento in EndfiwmenUy ed. 1876, 
pp. 97—110. 



WUl of the Rev. Richard Jackson 209 

mental PhiloBophj and the practical part thereof, and of Chymistry, to 
instruct the students in the said University in the said sciences, such 
Lecturer to be a Member of Trinity College (either Fellow or not), if J^o may be 
such be found equally qualified with any other candidate, and pre- 
ference to be given caeteris paribtu to a Staffordshire or Warwickshire 
or Derbyshire or Cheshire Man ; 

Which Lecturer being so chose by a majority of the said Regent 
Masters as aforesaid, (and in case dispute arise about the majority, 
then the same to be determined by the Vice-chancellor of the Univer- 
sity, the Provost of King's College, and the Master of Trinity College 
there, or if either of the two last be yice-Chaucellor, then by the 
Master of St John's College, so as to make up three, or by the majority 
of such three) shall within twelve calendar months after the day of his Duties of the 
election, read publickly a course of Lectiu^es on Anatomy, Animal 
Economy, Chymistry, Botany, Agriculture, or the Materia Medica at 
lai*ge, with due and proper exhibitions of the subject to be read upon, 
or whose properties are to be explained or enquired into, together with 
proper Dissections, Analyses and Experiments upon the subjects of the Subjects of 
same, according to their respective natures, as may compose a due aadstadira. 
series of experimental lectures and such practice as may truly thence 
result for confirmation of what is known at present, or for making 
further discoveries in any branch thereof as may best tend to set forth 
the Qlory of Almighty God, and promote the welfare of mankind, by 
making farther progress in the practice of physic or of agriculture, and 
the investigation of the relative properties of various earths, sands, 
clays, marls and the like to each other, so as they best may answer the 
growth of useful vegetables therein, and also in a more precise in- 
vestigation of the properties of what is or may hereafter be part of the 
Materia Medica, so as to form a more certain practice than at present 
exists of the art of curing diseases or preventing them or making life 
more easy under them ; and here it is my serious request that the said 
Lecturer will in this Disquisition have an eye more particularly to that 
opprobrium tnedicorum called the gout, both in getting a better history 
of the disorder itself, and the symptoms preceding, attending and 
following it, than is extant at present: Also of the best method of 
procrastinating the fits from coming by the use of diet and the other 
non-naturals : And in finding a medicine that may cure it (of which I 
have no doubt from the goodness of God that a discovery may be 
made); and my further request to the Lecturer or Professor is, that 
herein he will adhere to plain facts, both in the history and narrative of 
experiments without adding any hypothesis (unless after the manner 
that is done by Sir Isaac Newton at the end of his Optics) : But of this 
it is my intention, God willing, to draw up a more regular scheme of 
Series Lectioiiuniy directing what is to be shewn, and what is to be tried 
or done in a separate paper, to be kept annexed hereto. 

And my Will is that the Lectures be read on thirty-six several lectwes' 
C. 14 



210 WUl of the Rev. Richard Jacksmi 



flalarrtobe 
paid to lec- 
turer except 
one fifth 
which is to 
be paid to 
gardener of 
Physic 
Garden who 
shall supply 
pbtntefor 
the lecturea. 



What U to 
be done if 
lectureebe 
not given. 



Fee to 
Bunar. 



New lec- 
turer to be 
chosen. 



Whatiflto 
be done if 
theBegente 
do not elect 



days, and not lees than one hour at each lecture, on some of the days 
between the beginning of Michaelmas Term and the Commencement, 
yearly ; and that the said Lecturer or Professor do admit to the same, 
without fee or reward, twelve persons, four of whom to be of Trinity 
College, if they chuse to attend, and the other eight out of the Uni- 
versity at large, yet so that none of these shall have access to more 
than two of these courses of Lectures gratis, and that each of these 
shall attend at least thirty of the Lectures, and in case of neglect, 
others to be taken into their places, either in that course or in the next 
ensuing course. 

And my Will is, that at the end of the said course, the Biursar of 
Trinity College on such Lectiu^r producing a certificate as aforesaid, 
imder the hands of eight scholars as aforesaid, shall pay to him or his 
legal order the whole product of the Estate at Upper Longsdon afore- 
said, clear as it came in for the preceding year, excepting a fifth part 
of that sum yearly, which the said Biursar is hereby desired and directed 
to pay to the Chief or Head Qardener of the Physic Qarden in the said 
University, who in consideration thereof is required to furnish the said 
Lecturer or Professor with two or three (at least) specimens (either 
green if it may be or dry) of such plants or parts of plants as he may 
want to shew or examine in his Lectures, and which are of the growth 
of this Kingdom, he the said Professor giving the said Qardener a list 
of what plants he shall want a fortnight at least before the time they 
will be wanted : 

But in case the said Lecturer or Professor shall neglect or omit the 
said sixty days' Lectiu'es for the term of one whole year, then the 
Master Fellows and Scholars of Trinity College aforesaid, or some of 
them, or the Bursar on default of a certificate being brought to him 
that such Lecture had been duly read as aforesaid, shall give public 
notice by the ways and means aforesaid of such omission ; for which 
the said Bursar shall and may out of the said rent receive five pounds 
for his trouble; and then the said Regent Masters as aforesaid are 
requested within one calendar month after such notice, on a day to be 
fixed by the Master of Trinity College for that purpose, or in his 
absence, by the Vice-Master, to elect some other person qualified as 
aforesaid to be Lecturer or Professor in the same manner as if the 
former Lecturer was naturally dead : 

And in case the said Regents neglect or omit to chuse a new Pro- 
fessor or Lecturer within the time aforesaid, then the yice-Chancellor 
for the time being, the Provost of King's College and the Master of 
Trinity College, or the majority of them (taking in the Master of 
St John's College if either of the two last happen to be Vice-Chancellor) 
shall appoint a Lecturer to and for the purposes aforesaid, and according 
to the forementioned qualifications, provided always that no person, 
who by his neglect or omission of the said sixty Lectures has vacated 
his place, shall ever be chosen again or reinstated in the same. 



Will of the Rev. Richard Jackson 211 

And my Will is, that such rents as may arise or grow due during Rents ac- 
the time that a vacancy shall happen in the said Professorship by the dSriSI 
death of the said Reader, or his neglecting his duty, shall be paid in JepSS'to 
equal shares to two of the Students (whether Scholars of the House or SSientiof 
not) of Trinity College, who took the degree of Bachelor of Arts with ^™°- ^^^ 
most reputation previous to the day on which the said rents may grow 
due: 

And in case any doubt or dispute shall arise about the due reading How differ- 
of the said Lecture, or the proper subject of it, or the payment of the opinion re- 
salary of the Lecturer or Qardener of the Physic Qarden respectively or SSniM of* 
any other point or case relating to the premises herein contained, then tobeBettled 
my Will is that the same be determined by the Provost of King's 
Collie, the Master of Trinity College and the Master of Saint John's 
College in Cambridge, or the majority for the time being of them, and 
in case they shall be divided in their opinions, then by the Vice- 
chancellor for the time being (unless he happenis to be head of one of 
the three Colleges, and then by the Bishop of Ely for the time being), 
whose determination shall be final. But if any person shall think him- Aniwpeai to 
self aggrieved by such determination, and carry his plea to any other lAwisjiot 
Court of Common or Civil or Ecclesiastical Law or Eqiiity, then my 
Will is that by such process or appeal he or they shall be immediately 
and fully barred and deprived of all profit and benefit arising from the 
hereby demised premises as fully as if this Bequest had never been 
made.... 



Extract from a second Codicil to the above recited Will of the 
Rev, Richard Jackson, dated 25 JuLy, 1781. 

...In case the Course of Lectures at Cambridge are omitted to be DiBpoeiUon 
read, or the Lecturer, in case of vacancy, chosen for one calendar lectnreabe 



allowed. 



omitted. 



year, I then devise the whole year's rents of the Longsdon Estate to be 
paid to the Vicar and Overseers of the Poor of Leek, to be apphed in 
apprenticing children thereof. 



Sketch of Lectures in Practicai Philosophy. 

To the Master, Fellows and Scholars of Trinity College in Cam- 
bridge, Richard Jackson presents a sketch of the form of Lectures in 
Practical Philosophy which I would have followed by my Professor or 
Lecturer in the University of Cambridge. 

As my design in founding this Lecture is the promotion of real and ^^^'^ y^ 
useful knowledge, my opinion is, that this cannot be done to any good performed, 
purpose by mere reading a Discourse or Disquisition or Essay, but 
shewing and doing something in the way of experiment upon the 

14—2 



214 Will of the Rev. Richard Jatkson 



36 lectures 
and 30 ez- 
perlmenta. 



Copies of 
leclureto 
be fftyen 
to Vice- 
chancellor. 



The Gar- 
dener not 
onlrto 
deliver 
specimens 
to the lec- 
turer, but to 
make ex- 
periments 
on the 
culture of 
plants. 



who attend his Lectures, the number of which is set forth in my WiU. 
That is, the natural bodies which are the subject of experiment or of 
inquiry shall be exhibited by the Lecturer to the Students, by laying 
specimens of each before them which are genuine, and the obvious and 
primary properties as they appear in shattered condition pointed out, 
so that they may be distinguished by their peculiar characteristicks as 
far as can be this way done from all other bodies whatsoever. In the 
next place, there shall be a course of experiments made and exhibited 
by the Lecturer to the said Students, upon the natiuul bodies so 
exhibited to them in the way of Chymical Analysis, beginning with the 
gentlest and most simple operations, and proceeding as much as may 
be in a geometrical gradation to the more complex, in the manner of 
Boerhaave's Chymistry ; whereby the more hidden properties of natural 
bodies, and the relative qualities and effects which they have upon each 
other, and the changes which they operate on one another, may be 
developed as much as may be and faithfully laid open. 

And lastly, that along with, or after such exhibition and course of 
experiment (which experiments shall at least be thirty difierent set 
processes and operations), that the Professor or Lecturer shall, in a 
plain discourse in English, set forth all the phaenomena that occurred 
in the performing or exhibiting any and each of them, in the natural 
order that they appeared, with the final result of each, and what general 
doctrines may be raised from the whole; and that after the whole 
course of thirty-six Lectures and thirty Experiments thus read and 
exhibited to twelve Students at least, and their respective personal 
signing the certificate mentioned in my Will, that the said Lecturer, 
before ho receives the said salary, or any part thereof, deliver, or cause 
to be delivered to the Vice-chancellor of the University of Cambridge 
for the time being, two copies, feurly written, of one of the Lectures 
which had been read by him within the course exhibited that year, one 
of the said copies^ signed and dated by the said Vice-ChanoeUor, and 
the Lecturer, to be laid up in the Public Library of the University and 
the other in the Library of Trinity College, annually for ever; such 
Lecture each year being different from that of the preceding year, and 
yet so connected in general as to form a rational series of experimental 
doctrines. 

And as to the Gardener of the Physic or Public Garden of the said 
University, it is required that before the Legacy devised to him by my 
Will, or any part of the said Legacy be paid to him, that he shall have 
furnished to the said Lecturer of Physiology all such vegetables or 
parts of vegetables, being of the natural growth of these Kingdoms, as 
he may require, or shall be necessary or useful to him in the course of 
the said Lecture, of which delivery the Professor or the major part of 
the twelve Students, required by my Will to attend the said Lectiure, 
shall sign a certificate, to be by him delivered to the Master and Senior 
Fellows of Trinity College; and that the said Gardener for the time 



Will of the Rev. Richard Jdckson 216 

being sfaall at the time of delivering the said certificate, deliver alao an 
account in writing of ten different experiments which he had or shall 
have tried within the course of the preceding year, and which relate 
and tend to illustrate the rational culture of two at least of such 
vegetables as are most useful for food in the first place, and in the next 
as medicines to man, or any species of animals, setting forth therein 
the nature, qualities or composition of the several sorts of soil or 
composts, the degree of moisture or dampness, heat and cold, the 
effects of transplanting, grafting, inoculating, pruning, or other manual 
operations, on the vegetable or soil it was planted or grew in, which 
have by his own experience been foimd usefiil or hurtful to the growth 
of all and each of the several species of plants, which are by him 
subjected to trial, together with a detail of the sai^l experiments, in the 
order tried by him, and the good or pernicious effects of each honestly 
set forth; and herein I more particularly recommend an inquiry into 
the nature of such vegetables as will grow on sandy and gravelly or 
rocky soils and mountainous places which are now commonly naked, 
and reputed irremediably barren, which may be useful for food, medicine, 
manufactures or timber ; and also such manures or composts, and inter- 
mixing or changing several soils, which may promote the growth of 
useful v^etables on such soils ; making inquiry in our own and foreign 
nations what vegetables of any kind grow naturally therein, and trying 
whether by culture of any sort, or meliorating the several different 
earths, they may not be improved, so that those parts of the earth 
which are now useless or barren may bring forth something that may 
in some way be beneficial; and that the said Gardener's labours and 
ex^ieriments herein may be of use to mankind, I forbid him to spend 
his time in such trifling occupations as those people called Florists 
commonly spend their time on, as varying the colour or increasing the 
size of a tulip, ranunculus, &c., but in the culture of plants, useful as 
aforesaid to mankind, so as by a sagacious and well planned series of 
useful trials, a good and sure foundation may be laid for a system of 
rational agriculture. 

I recommend, in the first place, an Experimental Analysis of Lime ^^^t ex- 
Stones, their various kinds, and distinguishing marks, and the com- f^^efly 
parative goodness of each, and particularly wherein their activity lies, 
as experiments shall discover, and how and what effects they produce 
on animal and vegetable bodies, or different soils, and on what soils or 
kinds of soib they are more or less beneficial or hurtful, and what 
vegetables they assist or deprave the growth and goodness of, and in 
what quantity the several kinds of it may be best applied as medicine 
or manure. And as I have devised one-fifth part of the net produce of 
the rents of the estate at Longsdon to be paid yearly to the Qardener 
of the Public Gku-den of the University of Cambridge, my Will is, that 
the said Gardener, besides furnishing such plants as may be required 
by the Physiological Lecturer as necessary for his Lecture shall, in con- 



faToura. 



216 Will of the Rev. Richard Jackson 

sideration of such his share of the said rent, apply himself to investigate 
the nature and best method of such herbs of all sorts shrubs and trees, 
as are useful for food to man or cattle, and will by culture be made to 
grow on boggy, sandy, gravelly, or any other kind of land, which at 
present is by the said properties, or some other bad qualities, barren 
and unproductive of anything useful ; and as the Moorlands of Stafford- 
shire, near Longsdon, furnish many kinds of soil which are now un- 
fruitful, and the estate itself is naked of wood about the house, and all 
the hills around it void of trees, while the Alps and many parts of the 
Highlands of Scotland, and north parts of America are clothed with 
useful timber, though in a loftier, colder and more barren situation 
than any part of the Moorlands or Peak, my Will is, that the said 
Gardener do, in the first, apply himself to the surrounding the said 
Farm at Longsdon with hedges that may shelter and be of use in 
keeping the inclosures warm, and also in planting it with such trees, 
either single in rows, or in clumps, as by experience are foimd to 
flourish in such situations and such soils as that of Longsdon. And in 
doing this I recommend that ho would rather employ such shrubs and 
trees of the growth of cold foreign climates, both for fencing and 
timber, than of those which are in use in this nation, still having 
regard to those of which some experience has been had in the Physic 
Garden of Cambridge, or other place within the Gardener's own know- 
ledge, that time and costs may not be lost in planting things at 
Longsdon which previous trials have shewn to be such as to promise 
no good. The same rule I would recommend to be followed in cultiu^ 
of herbs and grasses on boggy, sandy, gravelly or other such barren 
soils ; that is, to have recourse to the product of such kind of places in 
foreign countries as of like sort with the soil of our own, on which how- 
ever the annual product exceeds that of our country. But still not to 
disregard or neglect the plants which are natives of our own barren {tic 
orig,\ which I know may be much meliorated by proper culture. And my 
Will is, that if the said Gardener shall want any portion of land be- 
longing to my said Estate at Longsdon, on which he may. think it right 
to make plantations of trees, shrubs or herbs, that the College shall 
permit him to have it, and in what quantity, and in what part of the 
Estate he shall {tic orig,) ; he, the said Gardener, making such abatement 
of rent to the Tenant, in proportion to the quantity and quality of the 
land so appropriated as the College shall appoint, and this I do on the 
especial confidence that such use will be made by the Gardener of the 
land so taken by him as will render the Estate better, and not worse, 
as this last must diminish his own salary, and improving the value of 
the Estate increase his own salary in proportion. And my Will is, that 
fifty trees be each year planted on the land, and well fenced^. 

> Collated with a " fair copy " in the Muniment Boom of Trinity College. 



The Downing College Professors 217 



14- Laws of England, Medicine (Downing College). 

1800. 

It is provided by the charter of Downing College, dated 
22 September, 1800, that the College "shall consist of one 
Master, two Professors (that is to say), a Professor of the 
Laws of Elngland and a Professor of Medicine, and sixteen 
Fellows*" [etc.]; and in a subsequent passage of the same 
charter provisions for the election and duties of the Professors 
are made : 

The future Professors of the said College shall be elected by the 
Lord Archbishop of Canterbury, the Lord Archbishop of York, and the 
Masters of St John's College and Clare HaU, and of the said intended 
collie, to be called Downing College, for the time being, from among 
persons qualified in the following manner (that is to say), The Law 
Professor shall be, at the time of his election, a Doctor of Laws, a 
Master of Arts, or a Bachelor of Laws in one of oiu* two Universities 
of England, of ten years standing from his matriculation, and also a 
Barrister at Law ; and the Professor of Medicine shall be, at the time 
of bis election, a Master of Arts, who shall have been licensed to 
practice physic for the space of two years, or a Doctor or Bachelor of 
Physic in one of our said two univendties of England, or a member of 
some one of the Scotch universities of seven years standing, and twenty 
five years of age, who shall have attended the medical lectures in one of 
the Scotch universities for four years*. 

The annual salary of each Professor is to be £200*. 

The Downing Professors are now governed by Statute V 
of the Statutes of Downing College*; and by Statutes D and 
E of the University Statutes. 



1 Comm, Doets, iii. 606. 

3 Ibid. p. 611. Their couTseB of lectures are defined in a sabsequent 
passage, p. 615. See also Statute N, pp. 627—629. 

s Ibid. p. 614. 

4 Statutes of Umvenity and College$, ISSd, p. 706. 



218 Professor of Mineralogy 



15. Mineralogy. 
1808. 

The first Professor of Mineralogy was elected by the 
following Grace, which passed the Senate 15 December, 
1808: 

Cum vir reverendus Edvardus Daniel Clarke LL.D. sit in studio 
Mineralogise apprime versatus, et eidem studio apud Vos promovendo 
curam magnopere impendent, turn lectionibus publicis, quas jam 
biennio perlegit, institutis, turn speciminibus undeqiuique oollectis 
exhibitis : 

Placeat Vobis ut idem E. D. Clarke Professoris Mineralogies titulo 
sufifragiis vestris cohonestetur^ 

After Clarke's death (9 March, 1822) the following Grace 
passed the Senate (15 May) : 

Cum per mortem Edvardi D. Clarke nuper Professoris Mineralogiw 
munus istud jam vacans existit, Placeat Vobis ut alius ad idem munus 
exequendum a Vobis eligatur'. 

The words 'a Vobis eligatur' were held by many members 
of the Senate to imply that the election was to be by the 
Senate without previous nomination by the Vice-Chancellor 
and Heads of Colleges. A nomination of two persons, 
however, took place, and votes were given, of which Mr 
Henslow received a majority'. A mandamus was applied 
for in the Court of King's Bench in 1822 and 1823, but 
judgment was not given. Finally the question was referred 
by the Senate to Sir John Richardson in a letter under 
Seal 25 December, 1825. His determination (A) dated 
1 December, 1827, was published to the Senate 12 December 
in the same year. 

The two succeeding Professors, Mr Whewell and Mr 
Miller, were admitted to the title of Professor by Grace : 

Plaociit Vobis ut Mag*" Whewell, ColL SS. Triu., titulum Professoris 
Mineralogiu3 apud Vos consequatur*. 

1 Grace Book A, p. 532. ^ jbid., M, p. 454. 

' Ibid., p. 466. For the whole question, and the titloB of the pamphlets 
published, see Cooper's AmiaU, iv. pp. 536, 537. 
« Ibid., N, p. 199, 21 March, 1828. 



Detenninaiion of Sir J. Riehardwn 219 

The Professor's salary, £100, was paid by the Crown till 
1867, when it devolved on the University^. 

A new statute was made by the Statutes S}mdicate, and 
confirmed by Grace, 15 December, 1857. This was subse- 
quently altered by the Commissioners 23 October, 1860, and 
their statute received the royal assent 16 April, 1861. This 
has since been repealed, and the Professorship is now governed 
by Statute B. 

A. Determinaiion of Sir John Richardson^ 

1 December, 1827. 

To the Vioe-Chanoellor of the UniverBity of Cambridge. 

Sir, 
In pursuance of the Letter, addressed to me by the Chancellor 
Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge in Senate 
assembled, sealed with their common sea], and bearing date the twenty 
second day of December one thousand eight hundred and twenty five, 
(wherein, after reciting that a difference of opinion had arisen in their 
Inxiy res|)ecting the Election of the Professors of Mineralogy, Botany and 
Anatomy, they requested me to determine, after having heard counsel, 
the maimer in which these Professors should in futiu^ be elected,) 
I have accepted the reference thereby made to me and have been 
attended by Mr Alderson and Mr Amos, the Counsel of the several 
Parties, and have heard such arguments, and perused and examined 
such papers and evidences, as they thought proper to lay before me 
respecting the matters in difference; and now having maturely con- 
sidered the same, I request you to make known to the Chancellor 
Masters and Scholars this my opinion and Determination on the 
premises, that is to say : 

First: I am of Opinion, and so determine, that although the 
University has from time to time appointed several Professors of 
Anatomy Botany and Mineralogy and in several instances has in so 
doing apparently assiuned that such offices continued to exist after the 
death of the last Professor, yet in fact whatever has been hitherto done 
on each and all of these occasions has amounted to no more than to 
temporary provisions, each made for the particular appointment at 
that time contemplated, and which had not the' effect of bindiug 
the University to continue the office, or to appoint another Professor 
after the next vacancy ; consequently, that the University has not yet 
founded or established any permanent Professorship either of Anatomy 
Botany or Mineralogy; and that no such permanent Offices do at this 
time exist : 

1 See above, pp. 181, 182. 



220 DisTiey Professor of Arch(eology 

Secondly : I am of Opinion, and so determine, that either Strangers 
with the previous or suhsequent consent of the University, or the 
University itself by Grace or By-Law, may, ad ErudUioniB amplifica' 
tionem, found and establish permanent Professorships in Anatomy 
Botany or Mineralogy, or in any other branch of Science or liberal 
Learning, and may by the terms of the foundation prescribe any 
reasonable mode of Election, which they may deem most proper, and 
that by so doing they would not infringe the Statutes of the University 
made in the twelfth year of the reign of Queen Elizabeth : 

Thirdly : I am of Opinion, and so determine, that if the University, 
or any Stranger, should found any new Professorship, and should not 
by the terms of the foundation provide any particular mode of Election 
the case would then fall within the provisions of the fortieth Chapter 
of those Statutes (that De nominations et electiona Lectorum et aliorum 
oficiariorum) and that the Elections must be made, in conformity 
therewith, according to the mode prescribed by the thirty fourth chapter 
of the same Statutes (that De electione ProcanceUarH) : 

Fourthly : I am of Opinion, aad so determine, that the words a vobis 
digcUur or other equivalent words, used in a Grace submitted to the 
Senate are not sufficient to prescribe any particular mode of Election ; 
such words being in my judgment equally satisfied by an Election 
made with, or without, previous Nomination ; which Election is in 
neither case made by the Senate assembled in Houses, but by the 
members of the Senate voting individually, and therefore, that in cases 
where an Election is made in pursuance of a Grace so worded, and 
where no particular mode of Election is otherwise prescribed, the mode 
of Election must be governed by the fortieth chapter of the Statutes 
before cited. 

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand this first day of 
December one thousand eight hundred and twenty seven. 

JOHN RICHARDSON. 

16. Archeology (Disney). 

1851. 

I. Mr Disney's collection of Ancient Marbles. 

This collection of Marbles was oflfered by Mr [John] 

Disney [of the Hyde, Ingatestone, Essex], to the Vice- 

Chancellor [James Cartmell, D.D., Master of Christ s College] 

at a personal interview in December, 1849. 

By the advice of the Heads of Colleges the Vice-Chancellor 
and Dr Philpott inspected the collection and reported it 
to be, in their judgment, worthy of the acceptance of the 
University. 



Disfiiey Collection of Ancient Marbles 221 

The Vice-Chancellor proposed to Mr Disney that the 
Senate should be invited to accept the Marbles on the 
condition that they should be always kept together as a 
collection bearing Mr Disney's name, and exhibited in some 
public building of the University. 

The Vice-Chancellor also added that at present the 
collection might probably be placed in the Statue gallery 
of the Fitzwilliam Museum, with the distinct understanding 
that it is not necessarily to continue there, if another arrange- 
ment should hereafter be found more convenient to the 
University or the Museum*. 

On the same day Mr Disney wrote as follows to the 
Vice-Chancellor : 

Cambridge, December 4, 1849. 
My dbar Sir, 

I hope I made myself distinctly understood, that the marbles, 
which we spoke about to-day, should he placed in a room (or part of a 
room) by themselves, as a set coming from me, and not mixed up with 
any other future donation ; each specimen bearing, as you suggested, 
my name, and date. 

They would, I think, fill the centre portion of the room you 
mentioned at the Fitzwilliam : certainly, either of the end compart- 
ments ; and within such compartment or room the inscription Disney 
Mtueum must be placed. 

If however the University wish to make it more especially their 
own, I have no objection to the collection being placed (stiU kept 
distinct) in any other pubhc building belonging to them. 

Believe me, yours truly, 

JOHN DISNEY2. 

The Vice-Chancellor next issued the following notice : 

Chbist^s College Lodge, AprH 10, 1850. 

The Vice-Chancellor has the gratification of announcing to the 
Members of the Senate that a valuable collection of ancient Marbles 
and Statuary has been offered to the University by John Disney, of the 
Hyde, in the County of Essex, Esquire, with the view of its being 

1 This aoooont of Mr Disney's gift is in the Minnte Book of the Fitz- 
william Moseam Syndicate, in the handwriting of Dr Gartmell. I have 
added the vsords in square brackets. 

2 From a copy in the same Minate Book. The original seems to be no 
longer in existence. 



222 Disney Professor of ArcJiceology 

placed in oue of the Public Buildings of the University, and being kept 
together as an Archsaological Collection bearing his name. 

The Vice-Chancellor gives Notice, That at the Congregation on 
Tuesday next, the 16th instant, Graces will be offered to the Senate : 

1. To accept Mr Disnej^s munificent offer on the conditions 
above specified ^ 

2. To affix the Seal to a letter of thanks written [by the Public 
Orator] to Mr Disney. 

3. To authorise the Syndicate apix>inted for tho management 
of the Fitzwilliam Museum to receive the Collection into the 
Museum ; and to make the necessary arrangements with Mr Disney 
for its removal 

These Graces passed the Senate without opposition, and 
the collection arrived in the course of the year. 

The collection consisted of 83 pieces, forming part of the 
collection of antiquities called Museum Diimeianum. It was 
formed by Mr Thomas Hollis and Mr Thomas Brand, in the 
course of several visits to Italy between 1748 and 1763, and 
placed at the Hyde in a room specially designed by Sir Wm. 
Chambers, Architect, to contain it. Some pieces had been 
subsequently added by Mr Disney himself. 

II. The Disney Professorship of Archceology. 

In the following year (12 March, 1861), the University 
was infonned by the Vice-Chancellor that Mr Disney had 
oflFered £1000 3 per cent. Bank Annuities to endow a 
Professorship, to be called the Disney Professorship of 
Archaeology. This proposal was accepted by Grace 4 April, 
1851, when a draft of the proposed deed of endowment (A) 
was laid on the Begistrary's table. A Qrace to seal this 
document passed the Senate 28 May, 1851. 

^ The words of this Qraoe are: Qaam obtolerit AoademuB Johannes 
Disneias de Hyde in Gomitata Bssezifi Armiger ooUeotanea pretioaa 
marmorum antiqnoram et siataaram qnn in Mnaeo aliqno Aoademioo 
ooneervarentar nomine CoUectaneorom ArohflBologioorom Disneianoroin : 
Plaoeat Yobis ut ooUeotanea dicta ab Aoademia aocipiantor. Grace Book 
O, p. 167. 

' See "Musenm Disneiannm, being a description of a oolleotion of 
Ancient Marbles, in the possession of John Disney, Esq., F.B.S., F.S.A., 
at the Hyde, near Ingatestone." 4to. London, 1846. The preface, by 
Mr Disney, contains a brief history of the ooUeotion. 



Disney Professw of ArehcBology 223 

Mr Disney died 6 May, 1867. By his Will, dated 
7 November, 1866, he made the following provision for 
increasing the endowment of his Professorship : 

...I give and bequeath to the Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the 
Univereity of Cambridge the sum of two thousand five hundred pounds 
in the Bank Three Pounds per Cent. Annuities in Trust nevertheless 
and as an augmentation of the Disney Archceological Professorship for 



A. Deed of Trust, 28 May, 1851. 

This Indentiu*e made the twenty eighth day of May in the year 28 May. 
of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and fifty one Between John p^^ies to 
Disney of the Hyde in the Parish of Ingatestone in the County of the deed. 
Essex Esquire and of Saint Peter's College in the University of 
Camhridge of the one part, and The Chancellor Masters and Scholars 
of the said University of Cambridge of the other part : 

Whereas the said John Disney has recently presented to the PreftmUe. 
University of Cambridge his collection of Statues and Works of Art 
and which collection is now deposited in the Fitzwilliam Museum and 
known by the name of the MiLseum Disnetanum ; 

And whereas the said John Disney is desirous of founding and 
endowing a Professorship in the said University to be called or known 
by the name of "The Disney Professorship of Archeeology" in manner 
hereinafter mentioned, and of providing a fund for the payment of a 
Professor who shall deliver Lectures on the subject of Antiquities and 
other matters and things connected with Antiquarian research and the 
Fine Arts; 

And whereas the said John Disney has previously to the execution 
of these presents transferred into the Names of the Chancellor Masters 
and Scholars of the said University and by that designation the sum 
of One thousand pounds Three pounds per centum per annum Consoli- 
dated Bank Annuities to be held by them upon the Trusts and for the 
intents and purposes hereinafter declared and agreed concerning the 
same; 

Now this Indenture Witneeseth and it is hereby mutually covenanted 
declared and agreed by and between the said parties hereto in manner 
following (that is to say) : 

First That the said Chancellor Masters and Scholars shall and will Disney Pro- 
as soon as conveniently may be establish and maintain in the said jSSSSolSgy 
University a Professorship to be called " The Disney Professorship of ISiJSied. 
Archaeology" and that the said Chancellor Masters and Scholars shall 
stand possessed of and interested in the said sum of One thousand Stf topo^ 
pounds Three pounds per centum Consolidated Bank Annuities so SSSooam- 
^ Begistiy, Vol xzxix. 24. 8. 



224 Disfiey Pro/e^or of Archceology 



▼«7ed to 
them bf 
John 
Diniey. 



ProfeoKMrto 
be appointed 
by DiBneT 
during hu 
life. 



After 
Disney's 
death by 
theVlee- 
Cbanoellor 
and Heads. 



Who may be 
Professor. 



Duties. 



May hold 
oflloe for 

5 years. 



To deliver 
sii lectures 



Penalty for 
neglect or 
misconduct. 



trannferred into their names by the said John Disney as aforesaid 
Upon trust to pay the Dividends Income and annual proceeds thereof 
to the Professor for the time being appointed as hereinafter men- 
tioned ; 

Secondly That the first appointment to the said Professorship shall 
be made by the said John Disney who shall and may during his life 
as well as such first appointment as from time to time so often as the 
Office shall become vacant of his own free will appoint by writing 
under his hand and seal a person to hold the said Disney Professorship 
of Archaeology, such person being a member of the University of 
Cambridge who has taken the Degree of Master of Arts or some higher 
Degree in the same University ; 

Thirdly Tliat from and after the death of the said John Disney 
whenever the said Professorship shall become vacant by effluxion of 
time or by the death or resignation of the Professor or from any other 
cause whatsoever it shall be lawful for the Vice-Chancellor and Heads 
of Colleges or Halls and in the event of their disability from absence 
or illness their respective deputies or locum-tenentes and they are 
hereby required within six Calendar months after any vacancy shall 
have happened to nominate and appoint the same or any other Member 
of the said University who shall have taken the Degree of Master of 
Arts or some higher Degree to hold the said Professorship ; 

Fourthly That it shall be the duty of the said Disney Professor 
of Archaeology to deliver in the course of each Academical year at such 
days and hours as the Vice-chancellor of the said University for the 
time being shall appoint Six Lectures at least on the subject of Classical 
Mediaeval and other Antiquities the Fine Arts and all matters and 
things connected therewith ; 

Fifthly That it shall be lawful for the Disney Professor of Archaeo- 
logy for the time being to hold his Office for five years from the date 
of his appointment but no longer unless he be reappointed in the 
manner hereinbefore described and that having in each Academical 
year delivered Six Lectures as aforesaid to the satisfaction of the Vice- 
Chancellor and Heads of Colleges he shall be entitled to receive the 
Dividends and Profits arising for that year from the above named sum 
of One thousand pounds Three pounds per centum per annum Consoli- 
dated Bank Annuities ; 

Sixthly That if the said Professor shall in any one year fail to 
deliver Six Lectiu-es as aforesaid and shall be unable to give and shall 
not give to the Vice-Chancellor and Heads of Colleges a satisfactory 
reason for such failure or if he shall at any time conduct himself in a 
manner unbecoming his station and position in the University then in 
either of such cases it shall be lawful for the Vice-Chancellor for the 
time being with the concurrence of a majority of the Heads of CoU^^es, 
to declare the said Professorship vacant and thereupon a new Professor 
shall be appointed in the manner hereinbefore described ; 



Professor of Political Economy 226 

And lastly that whatever Dividends and profits may aocrue from Diridends 
the above named sum of One Thousand poimds Three poimds per to be paid to 
centum per annum Consolidated Bank Annuities during anj vacancy fMor.*^ 
of the said Professorship shall be paid to the Professor next appointed 
in the manner aforesaid 

In witness whereof to these presents and a Duplicate hereof the 
said John Disney has hereunto affixed his hand and seal and the said 
Chancellor Masters and Scholars have hereunto affixed their Common 
Seal on the day and year first above written^. 



17. Political Economy. 
1863. 

In March, 1816, George Piyme, M.A., formerly Fellow of 
Trinity College, commenced a course of lectures in Political 
Economy* In 1828 (21 May) he was elected Professor by 
the following Grace : 

Cum Qeorgiiis Pryme A.M. Coll. S.S. Trinitatis nuper Socius, 
publicas Lectiones de principiis EconomiaD Politicse instituerit, et per 
multos jam annos perlegerit, 

Placeat Vobis ut idem Georgius Pryme titulo Professoris Economiso 
Politic86 vestris sufiragiis cohonestetur^. 

Professor Pryme continued to lecture until 1863, in which 
year, as he had notified his wish to be relieved of his duties, 
a Sjudicate was appointed (20 March) to consider (1) whether 
a Professorship of Political Economy should be established in 
the University; (2) under what rules. 

This Syndicate issued a report dated 1 May, 1863, in 
which they recommended the establishment of a Professor- 
ship; with rules for the appointment, salary, and duties 
of the Professor. This report was confirmed by Grace 
29 October, 1863*. The Professorship is now governed by 
Statute B. 

1 From the original in the Begistry of the University, Box N, No. 25. 
* See Autobiographical Recollections of Oeorge Pryme^ Bvo. 1870, p. 120. 
> Grace Book N, p. 207. 

^ The Beport will be found in the editions of the Ordinances dated 1871, 
1874, 1877. 

0. 16 



226 Professor of Zoology 

Professor Pryme died 2 December, 1868. His Will 
contained the following bequest: 

...I bequeath to the Chancellor Master and Scholars of the 
University of Cambridge my Books and Pamphlets on Political 
Economy respectively described in two Catalogues marked P. £., for 
the use of such persons as shaU from time to time succeed me as 
Professors of Political Economy, to be by such Professors used and 
holden in like manner as the Library attached to the Professorship 
of Modem History*. 



18. Zoology and Comparative Anatomy. 
1866. 

In 1865 (11 May) a Syndicate was appointed " to consider 
the best mode of providing for the teaching of Anatomy and 
Zoology in the University." In their report, dated 12 June, 
1866^ after stating that "the services of more than one 
Teacher are absolutely indispensable," they recommend : 

I. That the Professor of Anatomy should take the department of 
Hiunan Anatomy and Physiology, the lectures during one or more 
terms in each year being made suitable to students in Natural Science 
as well as to Medical Students. 

II. The appointment of a Demonstrator in Anatomy who, in 
addition to his ordinary duties, would assist in keeping the objects in 
the Museum in a proper state of preservation, and in adding to th^n, as 
opportunities occur. 

III. The appointment of a Professor of Zoology and Comparative 
Anatomy, who may so arrange his course in conjimction with the 
Professor of Anatomy, that the lectiures of both be mutually dependent 
and supply the needs of the Medical as well as the Natural Science 
Students'. 

These recommendations were coniSrmed by Grace 8 Feb- 
ruary, 1866, and the first Professor was elected 1 March. 
His successor will be governed by the provisions of Statute B. 

I Begistry, Vol. zzziz. 26. 22. 

* Grace Book Z, p. 83. Before this report was issued the Senate had 
confirmed (3 June) the report of a Syndicate appointed 24 November, 1S64, 
**to consider the Examinations for the Ordinaiy Degree of B.A." This 
report recommended, among other things, the institution of a Special 
Examination in Zoology. 

* The regulations which follow are printed in Ordinan6e», ed. 1901, p. 519. 



Professor of Sanskrit 227 



19. Sanskrit. 
1867. 

In 1863 (12 February) a letter was addressed to the Vice- 
Chancellor by the President and Council of the Royal Asiatic 
Society of Great Britain and Ireland, expressing their con- 
viction "that the greatest advantage will follow the institution 
of a Professorship of Sanskrit [in the University of Cambridge], 
not only to the interests of literature iand science, but also to 
the Public Service of the country." 

As the term of three years for which a teacher of 
Hindustani had been appointed expired 29 November, 1863, 
the Council of the Senate were led to consider the whole 
question of providing for the instruction of selected candi- 
dates for the Indian Civil Service in the vernacular languages 
of India; and in a report dated 23 October they recommended 
"that the Vice-Chancellor shall be empowered to expend 
annually a sum not exceeding £150 from the University 
Chest in engaging teachers of such of the Oriental languages 
and for such periods as he may think fit." This report 
having been confirmed by Grace 12 November, the Vice- 
Chancellor appointed a teacher in Sanskrit. 

In 1866 a Sjmdicate appointed (1 November) to consider, 
among other things, how a Professorship of Sanskrit might 
best be established in the University recommended (20 No- 
vember) " That there shall be established in the University 
a Professorship of Sanskrit," and fiumed regulations for the 
office. This report was submitted to a long consideration 
by the Council of the Senate, who took the opinion of 
Counsel on all the questions involved, and finally adopted 
the recommendations of the Syndicate in a report dated 
8 April, 1867, with one alteration, viz. that the Professor- 
ship should "terminate with the tenure of office of the 
Professor first elected*." This report having been confirmed 
by Grace 16 May, the first Professor was elected 7 June, 
1867. The Professorship is now governed by Statute B. 

* The regulations contained in this report are printed in Ordinances, 
ed. 1901, p. 520. 

16—2 



228 Elrington and Bosworth 



20. Anglo-Saxon (Elrington and Bosworth). 
1867. 

The Rev. Joseph Bosworth, of Trinity College, B.D. (Stat. 
Eliz.) 1834, D.D. 1839, Rawlinsonian Professor of Anglo- 
Saxon in the University of Oxford, by deed dated 2 December, 
1867 (A), announced his intention of transferring to certain 
trustees £10,000, for the purpose of founding a Professorship 
in the University of Cambridge, to be called the Elrington' 
and Bosworth Professorship of Anglo-Saxon, with regulations 
for the same. 

The Professorship was accepted by Grace 12 December, 
1867, when a letter of thanks, written by the Public Orator, 
was ordered to be sealed. 

The funds, however, were not transferred until after Dr 
Bosworth's death, which took place 27 May, 1876 ; and the 
notice of the Vice-Chancellor, stating that they had been 
transferred, and that the election would take place 15 May 
next ensuing, is dated 22 March, 1878". 

A. Deed of Trust, dated 2 December, 1867. 

si)e&i867. This Indenture made the seoond day of December 1867 between 

the Reverend Joseph Bosworth Doctor in Divinity and Rawlinsonian 
Professor of Anglo Saxon in the University of Oxford of the one part 
and the Reverend William Hepworth Thompson Doctor in Divinity 
and Master of Trinity College in the University of Cambridge Edwin 
Quest Esquire Doctor of Laws Fellow of the Royal Society and Master 
of Gonville and Caius College in the University of Cambridge the 
Reverend James Pulling Doctor in Divinity and Master of Corpus 
Christi College in the University of Cambridge and the said Joseph 
Bosworth (hereinafter called the said Trustees) of the other part 
intesUoDfl Whereas the said Joseph Bosworth is desirous of providing a fund 

BoiwortiL for the future establishment in the University of Cambridge of a Pro- 
fessorship for the promotion therein of the study of the Anglo Saxon 

1 Dr Lnard notes that this designation commemorates Ck>lonel Hamilton 
Elrington, first hosband of Anne Margaret Elliot, whom Dr Bosworth after- 
wards married. 

« Camh. Univ. Reporter, 26 March, 1878, p. 891. 



Professor of Anglo-Scucon 229 

Language aad the Languages cognate therewith together with the 
Antiquities and History of the Anglo Saxons such Professorship to be 
called the Elrington and Bosworth Professorship of Anglo Saxon ; 
And whereas for this purpose the said Joseph Bosworth has transferred 
or is about to transfer into the names of the said Trustees the sum of 
£lOfiOO now invested in certain securities deposited at the Bank of 
Messieurs Coutts and Company London as set forth in the first 
Schedule hereto to be held by the said Trustees upon the trusts and 
for the intents and purposes and subject to the declarations agreements 
and provisions hereinafter contained respecting the same ; 

Now this Indenture witnesseth that in pursuance of the said agree- 
ment and in consideration of the premises it is hereby agreed and 
declared that the said Trustees and the survivors and survivor of them J^^ *° 

and the executors or administrators of such survivor shall stand pos- funds untn 

, the Unlver- 
sessed of and interested in the said trust fimds and of the stocks funds rity hM 

shares and securities for the time being representing the same and the accept them, 
dividends and income thereof respectively upon trust for the said 
Joseph Bosworth his executors and administrators imtil the gift here- 
inafter contained of such trust funds and the dividends and income 
thereof shall be duly accepted by the University of Cambridge upon 
the terms and subject to the conditions contained in the second 
Schedule hereto such acceptance to be signified by Grace of the Senate 
of the said University to be obtained within twelve months from the 
date of these presents. And upon further trust after such Grace shall 
have been obtained to hold the said trust funds and all accumulations 
thereof until the same are transferred to the Chancellor Masters and 
Scholars of the University of Cambridge as hereinafter directed ; and 
from time to time until the same funds are transferred as aforesaid to 
invest the dividends and income thereof when received in the names of 
the Trustees in the purchase of Three per cent. Consolidated Bank 
Annuities or Reduced £3 per cent Annuities. And it is hereby further 
agreed and declared that it shall be lawful for the said Trustees at any 
time before the said funds shall be transferred as hereinafter directed 
to alter vary or transpose any of the said trust funds (excepting the 
portion consisting of Three per cent. Consolidated Bank Annuities or 
Reduced £3 per cent. Annuities) into or for stocks funds or securities 
of the same or a like nature or into or for any of the Parliamentary 
stocks or Public funds of Great Britain or into or for India Stock or 
Bank of England Stock or upon Real security in England or Wales. 
And further that it shall \ie lawful for the said Chancellor Masters and i<ij« Univer- 
Scholars after the said tnist fimds shall have been transferred to them ^"JJ^ert- 
at their absolute discretion to make such alteration variation and mentsorinif 
transposition and also to lay out all or any part of the said trust funds 
in the purchase of freehold or copyhold estates in England or Wales 
the rents and profits thereof to be applied in the same manner as the 
dividends and income of the said original trust funds provided always 



230 ElringUm and Bostvorth 

and it ia hereby further agreed and declared that if at any time within 
twenty years from the date hereof the monies which would be produced 
from a sale calling in or conversion of the said sum of £10,000 or the 
ProTlao. securities in or upon which the same shaU for the time being be laid 
out or invested together with the funds to be produced by such invest- 
ment and accumulation of the dividends and income of the said sum of 
£10,000 as aforesaid shall be sufficient to purchase £3 per cent. Con- 
solidated Bank Annuities or Reduced £3 per cent Annuities to such an 
amount as would by means of the Dividends thereof produce an annual 
income of not less than £600 then and in such case the said Trustees 
shall forthwith sell call in or convert into money such portion of the 
said trust funds as should not then already be invested in Consolidated 
annuities or Reduced annuities as hereinbefore directed and invest the 
monies produced thereby in the purchase of £3 per cent. Consolidated 
Bank Annuities or Reduced Annuities in the name of the Chancellor 
Masters and Scholars aforesaid and also transfer into the same name 
the portion then already invested in the said Annuities and if the 
event requiring the investment and transfer as last aforesaid should 
not arise vrithin the said twenty years it shall at the expiration of that 
period be obligatory upon the said Trustees then forthwith to sell call 
in convert invest and transfer the said trust funds as last aforesaid. 
And it is hereby further agreed and declared that all expenses attend- 
ing any such alteration variation or transposition as aforesaid or other- 
wise incidental to the establishment and maintenance of such Profes- 
sorship and which shall not be defrayed by the said Chancellor Masters 
and Scholars shall be paid and discharged out of the annual income of 
the said trust funds and not out of principal provided always that if 
the said gift shall not be accepted by a Grace of th^ Senate in manner 
aforesaid within twelve months from the date of these presents the 
said trust funds and the dividends and income thereof shall be the 
absolute property of the said Joseph Bosworth his executors adminis- 
trators and assigns. 

In witness whereof the said parties to these Presents have hereunto 
set their hands and seals the day and year first above written. 



FIRST SCHEDULE. 



8. d. 



One Debenture or Mortgage Bond in the North- 
Eastem Railway Company numbered 9086 
dated 15th May 1866 and payable 28th April 
1869 for 5,000 

East India Railway Stock amounting to £4520 

worth 5,000 

10,000 



Profeasor of Anglo-Saxon 231 

SECOND SCHEDULE. 

When and so soon as the said trust funds shall have been trans- 
ferred to the said Chancellor Masters and Scholars as aforesaid, 

1. There shall be established in the University of Cambridge an TiOe^Pro- 
Anglo-Saxon Professorship to be called the Ehrington and Bosworth *"** ^ 
Professorship of Anglo-Saxon. 

2. The Electors to such Professorship shall consist of the following Eiecton. 
persons: 

(1) The Vice-chancellor for the time being of the said Uni- 
versity. 

(2) The said Joseph Bosworth during his life and after his 
death the Rawlinsonian Professor for the time being of Anglo-Saxon 
in the University of Oxford. 

(3) The Master for the time being of Trinity Collie Cambridge. 

(4) The Master for the time being of Gk>nville and Caius CoUege 
Cambridge. 

(5) The Master for the time being of Corpus Christi College 
Cambridge. 

(6) The Regius Professor of Greek for the time being in the 
University of Cambridge. 

(7) The Professor of Modem History for the time being in the 
University of Cambridge. 

(8) The Professor of Sanscrit for the time being in the Uni- 
versity of Cambridge. 

3. The Professor shall be elected by a majority of the votes of the Procedure at 
electors present at a meeting convened for that purpose as hereinafter ^^ ^'"* 
mentioned and in case of an equality of votes the said Joseph Bosworth 

during his Ufe if present at such meeting and after his death then the 
Vice-chancellor for the time being of the University of Cambridge if 
present and in his absence the elector then present next in rotation 
according to the above order shall have a double or casting vote. 

4. The person to be elected Professor must be at the time of his Who may be 
election a graduate of one of the Universities of Cambridge Oxford or ^*"''«"**'- 
Dublin. 

5. The first election of a Professor shall take place within two Howeoonan 
months from the date of the eetabUshment of such Professorship take^lpUoe^ 
unless the two months expire in the time of vacation in which case ^(|^^. 
the election may be deferred to a day in the ensuing term and after the 
election of the first Professor whenever a vacancy shall occur of such 
Professorship a new election shall take place within two months from 

the date of such vacancy the period of vacation not being reckoned in 
the calculation. The day of election to be fixed by the Vice-Chancellor. 

6. The Vice-ChanceUor shall give public notice of the day for the ^S^rire 
first election and of any future vacancy and of the day for electing a J^tioe ot 
new Professor to such vacancy by fixing a written or printed paper on tion. 



232 



Elrington and Bosworth 



Tenure. 



ProfeeBor 
toreoelTe 
whole 
inoomee 
of fond. 



Reeldenoeof 
Professor 
and number 
of lectures. 



Scheme of 
lectures to 
beapproyed 
braBocurd 
of Studies. 



Professor's 
notice of 
lectures. 



Fee. 



Deputy. 



the door of the Public Schools at Cambridge and also by advertisement 
in the "Times" or in some one or more London and one or more 
Cambridge and Oxford Newspapers and the day of election shall be not 
sooner than 28 days or later than 56 days after the date of the notice 
and the Yice-ChauccUor shall also send as far as j^racticable such notice 
to each of the above mentioned electors by post at his last known place 
of abode in England. 

7. The Professor to hold the Professorship for life except as herein- 
after provided. 

8. The Professor shall receive by way of stipend the whole of the 
dividends and income of the trust funds to be transferred to the Chan- 
cellor Masters and Scholars of the said University subject to the 
payment thereout of such incidental expenses (if any) as aforesaid and 
subject to the provisions hereinafter contained. 

9. It shall be the duty of the Professor to reside within one mile 
and a half of Great St Mary's Church Cambridge for 18 weeks at least 
in term time during each year and to deliver not less than 15 lectures 
in each year. 

10. The Professor shall order as well the subject of such lectures 
as the times and places of their delivery according to a scheme to be 
approved by some Board of Studies specially assigned by Grace of the 
Senate for this purpose such Board providing that the subject of the 
lectures be determined with regard to the general object of the Profes- 
sorship as indicated by the deed of foundation. 

11. The Professor shall give public notice of the time and place of 
his intended lectures in the printed form usually issued by other Pro- 
fessors a fortnight at least before the commencement of his lectures in 
each Term. And he shall not deliver more than throe lectures in any 
seven consecutive days. 

12. The lectures reqiiired of the Professor shall be delivered gratis, 
but for any extra course of lectures which he may deliver (such course 
to consist of not less than twelve lectures) he shall be entitled to charge 
such a fee for attendance as may from time to time be fixed by a Grace 
of the Senate. 

13. If by reason of sickness necessary absence from the University 
or other sufficient cause the Professor desire to have a deputy to 
discharge the duties of the Professorship he shall be required to obtain 
the consent of the Vice-Chancellor and the six persons elected and 
acting in accordance with Section 4 Chapter 7 of the Statutes of the 
University such consent to be given in writing and to specify the time 
for which the deputy is to be appointed and such deputy shall in 
every case be nominated by the Professor and approved by Grace of the 
Senate and shall receive such stipend as may be also approved by 
Grace of the Senate being not less than one-third or more than two- 
thirds of the proportional part of the whole annual stipend of the 
Professor for the time for which the deputy is appointed. 



ProfetMT of An^o-Saxan 233 

14. It shan be the duty of the Froieaaosr also to d^vo- to the 
Vice-Channellor oDoe m eTeiy year before the end <^ the Easter Tenn 
a statemeDt in writing of the number of kctareB given by him during 
the preceding year and c^ the times of delivery together with the 
nomber of weeks in eadi of the three terms during which he has 
resided within one mile and a half of Great St Mary's Church. 

15. If it shafl be proved to the satis£actioD of the Vioe-Chanoelkir D qpiyth» 
and the six persons elected and acting as aforesaid that the Pn>feB8or ^ '**""**' 
has been wilfully neglectful of lus duties or guiity of gross or habitual 
immorality it shall be competent to the Vice-Chancellor and the said 

six persons to admonish the Pkt>fe8sor or to deprive him of his office as 
the case may seem to them to require and if the sentence of depriva- 
tion be thus passed upon him the Professorship shall thereupon 
become tjp«o Jacto void but in every case whether of admonition or of 
deprivation an appeal to the University shall be allowed in accordance 
with the provisions <^ Chap. 8 of the Statutes of the University. 

16. If it be certified to the Vice-Chancellor and the said six posons Dl-heiJlh of 
that the Professor is become unaUe to dischaige his duties by age ill 
health or other serious impediment and if the Vice-Chancellor and the 
said six persons shall deem the inability to be sufficientiy pax>ved they 
shall have the power of requiring a deputy to he appointed for any time 
not exceeding twelve Calendar months which appointment if necessary 
may be renewed finom time to time and the deputy in every such case 
shall be nominated by the Profeas<»' and approved by Grace of the 
Senate and shafl receive such stipend as may be also iq^iroved by 
Grace of the Senate being not less than one-third nor more than two- 
thirds of the proportionate part of the whole annual stipend of the 
Professor for the time fcM" which the deputy is appointed. If the Pro- 
fessor fiul to nominate a deputy within three months after being 
required to do so or if the Senate do not approve tiie perscm nominated 
by him the nomination shall be made by the Vioe-Chancellor subject 
to the like i^jprovaL 

17. The Clianoellor Masters and Scholars of the University of 
Cambridge ahaU have power but without prgudice to and so as not to 
aflfect the ri^ts or privileges of the person for the time being holding 
the said Professorship without his consent in writing to alter or vary 
any of the above mentioned rules and regulations and to make any 
additional rules and reguktion.<i by Grace of the Senate but no such pkorim 
alterations variations or additions shall be made during the life of the 
said Joseph Botfworth without his consent in writing and no such 
alterations variations or additions shall under any circumstances be 
made in the above mentioned Rules and Emulations numbered respec- 
tively 1, 2, 3, 7, and SK 

1 The original is in the Begistry of the University, Box N, No. 26. 



234 Professor of Latin 

21. Latin. 
1869. 

The circumstances under which a fund was collected for 
the purpose of recognising the services rendered to literature 
and education by the Rev. Benj. Hall Kennedy D.D., some- 
time Fellow of S. John's College and Regius Professor of 
Greek 1867-1889, are related in the subjoined documents, 
and need not be repeated here. 

The sum collected was ofifered to the University 
14 December, 1868, in the name of the subscribers, by the 
Rev. Will. Geo. Clark, M.A., Fellow of Trinity College, and 
Public Orator, acting on behalf of himself and the two other 
trustees. 

A Syndicate was appointed, 11 February, 1869, to consider 
the ofifer, and to frame regulations. In their report, dated 
13 April, they recommended the acceptance of the ofifer with 
thanks, and submitted regulations which had been approved 
by the subscribers. This report was confirmed by Grace, and 
the deed of trust, which had been circulated with the Report 
of the Syndicate, was ordered to be sealed, 29 April. The 
first Professor was elected 12 June, 1869. 

The letter of Mr Clark to the Vice-Chancellor (A), the 
letter of the trustees to the same (B), and the deed of trust 
with regulations (C), are printed below. 



A. The Rev. W. G. Clark, P\Mio Orator, to the 
Vice-Chancellor. 

Trinity College, 
December 14, 1868. 
Dear Mr Vige-Chancellor, 

I beg to forward to you the enclosed letter. I was requested on 
behalf of the Committee of Subscribers to say that in mentioning only 
such and such conditions, we do not at all mean that the Professor 
should be exempt from other r^ulations which the Senate may think 
proper to impose respecting lectures and residence. 

I am, [etc.] 

W. G. CLARK. 



Kennedy Subscription Fund 235 



B. The Trustees of the Kennedy Subscription Fund to the 
Vice-Chancellor. 

Trinity College, 

December 14, 1868. 

Rev. Sir, 

On the retirement of Dr Kennedy from the Head Mastership of 
Shrewsbuiy School, his friends and former pupils set on foot a sub- 
scription, the amount of which it was proposed to offer to the 
University of Cambridge for the purpose of founding a Professorship 
of Latin, to be called the Kennedy Professorship. 

After Dr Kennedy's election to the Regius Professorship of Greek, 
he offered to give £500 to the fund, on condition that his name should 
not be attached to the Professorship of Latin. This offer was accepted 
by the Committee of Subscribers. 

The total amount received from subscriptions and interest on de- 
posits, less expenses, is £4318. 10«. Ad. represented by £3515. 10«. lOc^. 
Indian five per cent. Stock, and a balance in hand of £218. \0s. 4cL 

In the name of the Subscribers, we, the undersigned Trustees, beg 
to offer this sum to the University on the following conditions : 

1. That it be called «The Latin Professorship Fund," and that 
the annual proceeds be pedd to a Professor of Latin. 

2. That the Professor be elected before the end of the year 1869. 

3. That the Electors to the Professorship be, The Regius Pro- 
fessor of Greek, The Public Orator, The Professor of Sanskrit^ The 
four members of the Senate elected by Grace to serve on the Board of 
Classical Studies, The Professor of Latin in the University of Oxford, 
and the Head Master of Shrewsbury School, for the time being. 

4. That a statement of the circumstances under which the fund 
was subscribed be inserted in the Cambridge Calendar. 

With regard to the third condition we would also suggest that, in 
case the votes of the electors present were equally divided between two 
candidates, the decision should rest with the Vice-chancellor. 

We have introduced the Professor of Latin at Oxford among the 
Electors, in commemoration of the generous aid whidh we have received 
from many Members of that University; and the Head Master of 
Shrewsbury School, as a record of the purpose for which the fund was 
primarily designed. 

We remain, [eta] 

WILLIAM GEORGE CLARK. 
ROBERT BURN. 
F. T. COLBY. 



236 



Professor of Latin 



C. The Deed of Trust, dated 1 May, 1869. 



1 Mfty 1869. 



Kennedy 

ProfeflBor- 

shipof 

Lafintobe 

founded. 



Name to be 
changed to 
Latin Pro- 
feBBorahlp. 



Amount of 
Fund. 



Subscribers 
have agreed 
to transfer 
this to Unl- 



This Indenture made the first day of May 1869 between the 
Reverend William George Clark M.A. Clerk Fellow of Trinity College 
in the University of Cambridge and Public Orator of the same Uni- 
versity the Reverend Robert Bum M.A. Clerk Fellow of Trinity 
College aforesaid and the Reverend Frederic Thomas Colby B.D. Clerk 
Fellow of Exeter College in the University of Oxford of the one part and 
the Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge of 
the other part. 

Whereas upon the retirement in the year 1865 from the Head 
Mastership of Shrewsbury School of the Reverend Benjamin Hall 
Kennedy Doctor of Divinity now Professor of Greek in the said Uni- 
versity of Cambridge and Canon of Ely certain friends and former 
pupils of the said Benjamin Hall Kennedy met together for the purposa 
of considering in what way the great services he had rendered to 
Literature and Education might be best recognised and determined 
that a fund should be collected and presented to the University of 
Cambridge for the purpose of founding a Professorship of Latin to be 
called the Kennedy Professorship. 

And whereas the said William George Clark Robert Bum and 
Frederic Thomas Colby were appointed to act as Trustees of the said 
Fund. And whereas the said Benjamin Hall Kennedy afterwards 
offered to give a sum of £500 to the said Fund but only upon condition 
that his name should not be attached to the proposed Professorship 
And whereas at a General Meeting of Contributors to the said Fund 
held on the 10th day of June 1807 this offer of the said Benjamin Hall 
Kennedy was accepted and it was fiu-ther resolved with the consent of 
the said Benjamin Hall Kennedy that the proposed Professorship 
should be called the Latin Professorship in the Deed of Gift to the 
University and that the circumstances under which the Fund had been 
originally collected should be stated in the said Deed of Gift and in the 
Cambridge University Calendar. 

And whereas the total sum received on account of the said Fund 
from subscriptions interest on deposits and dividends on Stock after 
deducting the expenses incurred in relation to the said Fund is now 
represented by the sum of £3745. 10«. \Qd, India 5 per cent, stock. 

And whereas the said William George Clark Robert Bum and 
Frederic Thomas Colby on behalf of themselves and all other the 
Contributors to the said Fund with the sanction of a General Meeting 
of the Contributors to the said Fund held on the 27th day of April 
1869 have offered to transfer the said Fund to the said Chancellor 
Masters and Scholars upon the terms and subject to the conditions 
contained in the Schedule hereto and the said Chancellor Masters and 
Scholars have agreed to accept such offer. 



Deed of Trust 237 



Now this Indenture witnesseth and it is hereby agreed and declared 

that so soon as conveniently may be after the execution of these 

presents the said William George Clark Robert Bum and Frederic 

Thomas Colby shall transfer to the said Chancellor Masters and J^^JS^*! 

Scholars the said sum of £3745. 10*. \0d, India 5 per cent. Stock poweeaed 

of it. 
and also after deducting thereout any expenses incurred by them in 

relation thereto all such further sums as they the said William Geoige 
Clark Robert Bum and Frederic Thomas Colby or any of them may 
at any time hereafter receive as contributions to the said Fund and 
that the said Chancellor Masters and Scholars shall at all times here- 
after stand possessed of the said sum of Stock and all such further 
sums as may be transferred to them as aforesaid on account of contri- 
butions to the said Fund upon the trusts and subject to the terms and 
conditions contained in the said Schedule hereto. In witness whereof 
the said William George Clark Robert Bum and Frederic Thomas 
Colby have hereunto set their respective hands and seals and the said 
Chancellor Masters and Scholars have caused their common Seal to be 
hereunto affixed the day and year first above written. 



D. The Schedule above referred to. 

1. When and so soon as the above-mentioned sum of £3745. lOa. 10c?. Frof«Bor- 
India five per cent Stock shall have been transferred to the Chancellor, Lafin to be 
Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge, there shall be ^^ 
established in the University of Cambridge a Professorship to be called 

The Professorship of Latin. 

2. The electors to such Professorship shall consist of the following Eieoton. 
persons: 

(1) The Vice-Chancellor for the time being of the said Uni- 
versity: 

(2) The Regius Professor of Greek for the time being in the said 
University : 

(3) The Public Orator for the time being of the said University: 

(4) The Professor of Sanskrit for the time being in the said 
University : 

(5) The Members of the Senate for the time being who have 
been specially elected by Grace to serve on the Board of Classical 
Studies in the said University : 

(6) The Professor of Latin for the time being in the University 
of Oxford: 

(7) The Head Master for the time being of Shrewsbury School : 
Provided that in case any one or more of the above-named electors 

shall be a candidate or candidates for the Latin Professorship on any 
occasion, he or they shall not be entitled to vote or to have any voice 
in the election on that occasion. 



not to TOto. 



238 



Professor of Latin 



Prooednxeat 



Dftteof flnt 
election. 



ito 
take place 
two monthfl 
after a 
Tioaiicynot 
ooanting 
▼aeation. 



Vloe-Chan- 
oellortogiTe 
notice of 
day of elec- 



Tenure. 



Profeosor 
toreoelTe 
whole 
income of 
Fond. 



Aeeldenoeof 
Prof( 



Scheme of 

leot oreBto 

be approved 

byAMffdof 

Ckaaical 

Stndiea 

ProfeMor'B 

notice of 

leotores. 



3. The ProfesBor shall be elected by a majority of the votes of the 
electors present at a meeting convened for that purpose as hereinaftor 
mentioned and in case of an equality of votes the Regius Professor of 
Greek for the time being in the University of Cambridge if present, 
and in his absence the elector present who stands first in rotation 
according to the above order, shall have a double or casting vote. 

4. The first election of a Professor shall take place within two 
months from the date of the establishment of such Professorship unless 
the two months expire in the time of vacation, in which case the elec- 
tion may be deferred to a day in the ensuing term, provided that the 
first Professor be elected before the end of the year 1869 ; and after the 
election of the first Professor, whenever a vacancy shall occur of such 
Professorship, a new election shall take place within two months from 
the date of such vacancy, the period of vacation not being reckoned 
in the calculation. The day of election shall be fixed by the Vice- 
chancellor. 

6. The Vioe-ChanceUor shall give public notice of the day for the 
first election and of any future vacancy and of the day for .electing a 
new Professor upon such vacancy : and the day of election shall be not 
sooner than 28 days nor later than 56 days after the date of the notice ; 
and the Vice-Chancellor shall also send as far as practicable such 
notice to each of the above-mentioned electors by post at his last 
known place of abode in England. 

6. The Professor shall hold the Professorship for life except as 
hereinafter provided. 

7. The above-named simi of Stock and all other sums of Stock (if 
any) which may be transferred to the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars 
of the said University in pursuance of the above-written Indenture, 
shall when so transferred be called "The Latin Professorship Fund," 
and the Professor shall receive by way of stipend the whole of the 
dividends and income of the said Fund subject to the payment there- 
out of incidental expenses (if any) and subject to the provisions herein- 
after contained. 

8. It shall be the duty of the Professor to reside within one mile 
and a half of Great St Mary's Church Cambridge for 18 weeks at least 
between the first day of October and the last day of the Easter Term, 
and to deliver one course of not less than 10 lectures in each of two 
terms in every year. 

9. The Professor's scheme of lectures shall be subject to the 
approval of the Board of Classical Studies. 

10. The Professor shall give public notice of the time and place of 
his intended lectures in the printed form usually issued by other Pro- 
fessors a fortnight at least before the commencement of his lectures in 
each Term. 

11 . The lectures required of the Professor shall be delivered gratis, 
but for any extra course of lectures which he may deliver he shall be 



Deed of Trust 289 

eDtitled to charge such a fee for attendaDce as may from time to time 
be sanctioned by the Vice-chancellor. 

12. If by reason of sickness necessary absence from the University Depatj. 
or other sufficient cause the Professor desire to have a deputy to dis- 
charge the duties of the Professorship he shall be required to obtain 

the consent of the Vice-chancellor and the six persons elected and 
acting in accordance with Section 4 Chapter 7 of the Statutes of the 
University, such consent to be given in writing and to specify the time 
for which the deputy is to be appointed; and such deputy shall in 
every case be nominated by the Professor and approved by Grace of the 
Senate, and shall receive such stipend as may be also approved by 
Grace of the Senate being not less than one-third or more than two- 
thirds of the proportional part of the whole annual stipend of the Pro- 
fessor for the time for which the deputy is appointed. 

13. It shall be the duty of the Professor also to deliver to the Pxofeasor'B 
Vice-Chancellor once in every year before the end of the Easter Term to vice- 

a statement in writing of the number of Lectures given by him during c**'***^^- 
the preceding year and of the times of delivery together with the 
number of weeks between the first day of October and the last day of 
the Easter Term during which he has resided within one mile and 
a half of Great St Mary's Church. 

14. If it shall be proved to the satisfaction of the Vice-Chancellor i>epriyation 
and the six persons elected and acting as aforesaid that the Professor fMBor. 
has been wilfully neglectful of his duties or guilty of gross or habitual 
immorality, it shall be competent to the Vice-Chancellor and the said 

six persons to admonish the Professor or to deprive him of his office as 
the case may seem to them to require ; and if the sentence of depriva- 
tion be thus passed upon him, the Professorship shall thereupon 
become ipso facto void: but in every case whether of admonition 
or of deprivation an appeal to the University shall be allowed in 
accordance with the provisions of Chapter 8 of the Statutes of the 
University. 

15. If it be certified to the Vice-Chancellor and the said six lu-h«dthof 
persons that the Professor is become imable to discharge his duties by 

age ill health or other serious impediment, and if the Vice-Chancellor 
and the said six persons shall deem the inability to be sufficiently 
proved they shall have the power of requiring a deputy to be appointed 
for any time not exceeding twelve calendar months, which appointment 
if necessary may be renewed from time to time ; and the deputy in every 
such case shall be nominated by the Professor and approved by Grace 
of the Senate, and shall receive such stipend as may be also approved 
by Grace of the Senate being not less than one-third nor more than 
two-thirds of the proportionate part of the whole annual stipend of the 
Professor for the time for which the deputy is appointed. If the Pro- 
fessor fail to nominate a deputy within three months after being re- 
quired to do so, or if the Senate do not approve the person nominated 



240 Slade Professor of Fim Art 

by him, the nomination shall be made by the Vice-Chancellor subject 

to the like approval. 

Bc«niiftttoii« 16. The Chancellor Mcusters and Scholars of the University of 

ments mxy Cambridge shall have power, but without prejudice to and not so as to 

be changed, q^q^ ^^ rights or privil^es of the person for the time being holding 

the said professorship without his consent in writing, to alter or vary 

any of the above-mentioned rules and regulations, and to make any 

additional rules and regulations by Grace of the Senate ; and also to 

vary from time to time, if they see fit, the investments in which the 

said funds or any part thereof is or may be hereafter invested. 

17. The Vice-Chancellor shall in accordance with the earnest 
wishes of the contributors, and in order to preserve a permanent 
record of the fact that the Fund was primarily established in honour 
of Dr Kennedy, make all possible provision for inserting in the Cam- 
bridge Calendar an account of the origin of the Latin Professorship 
Fund*. 



22. Fine Art (Slade). 
1869. 

Felix Slade, by a codicil to his Will, dated 25 March, 
1868 (A), bequeathed £45,000 to his executors, to be by 
them employed, among other things, to found a Professorship 
of Fine Art in the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge 
and at University College, liondon. 

Mr Slade died 29 March, 1868, and rather more than 
a year affcerwards (27 May, 1869) the Vice-Chancellor 
announced the bequest, with the deed of trust (B), containing 
the regulations. Graces to seal the deed, and to thank the 
executors, passed the Senate 24 June, 1869. The first 
Professor was elected 7 December, 1869. 



A. Extract from a codicil to the WiU of Felix Slade, 
dated 25 March, 1868. 

This is a Codicil to the last Will and Testament of me Felix Slade 
which will is dated the twenty fifth day of March one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty eight I give to the Trustees and Executors named 
in my said will the sum of forty five thousand pounds sterling free 
from legacy duty upon trust with so much of the same sum as my 

1 From the original in the Begistry of the Uniyentity, Box N, No. 28. 



Deed of Trust 241 

said Trustees and Executors shall ascertain to be sufficient for the 
purpose not exceeding altogether the sum of thirty five thousand pounds 
to found and endow within two years after my decease three or more 
Professorships for promoting the study of the fine arts to be termed 
the Slade Professorships of Fine Arts one of such Professorships being 
founded and endowed in the University of Oxford another in the 
University of Cambridge and one or more in the University College of 
London the amount of the sum to be expended in founding and 
endowing each of such Professorships being in each case at the dis- 
cretion of my said Trustees and Executors it being also at their 
discretion whether the sums should be equal or unequal in amount and 
each of such Professorships shall be founded and endowed upon such 
terms and under such regulations and provisions as shall be agreed 
upon between my said Trustees and Executors and the University or 
College in which the same shall be founded and endowed....! have made 
the aforesaid disposition of the sum of forty five thousand pounds 
hereby given for a sincere wish and in the hope thereby to confer a 
benefit on Society^ 



B. Deed of Trust, dated 17 June, 1869. 

This Indenture made the 17th day of June 1869 between Edward i7Jime,i8«9. 
Weyman Wadeson of No. 40 Tavistock Square in the County of 
Middlesex Esquire Charles CoUambell of No. 15 Lambeth Terrace in 
the County of Surrey Esquire Richard Fisher of No. 4 Portsdown Road 
Maida Hill in the said County of Middlesex Esquire and Augustus 
Wollaston Franks of the British Museum in the said County of Middlesex 
Esquire of the one part and the Chancellor Masters and Scholars of 
the University of Cambridge of the other part Whereas Felix Slade wmofPelix 
formerly of Doctors Commons and then of Walcot Place Lambeth in 
the County of Surrey and of HaLsteads in the Parish of Thornton in 
Lonsdale in the West Riding of the County of York Esquire duly made 
and executed his last Will and Testament in writing dated the 25th 
day of March 1868 and thereby appointed the said Edward Weyman 
Wadeson Charles Collambell Richard Fisher and Augustus Wollaston 
Franks Trustees and Executors of that his Will And whereas the said 
Testator duly made and executed a Codicil to his said Will bearing 
date the said 25th day of March 1868 whereby he gave to the Trustees 
and Executors named in his said Will the sum of £45,000 sterling free 
from L^acy duty upon trust amongst other things with so much of 
the same sum as his said Trustees and Executors should ascertain to be 

1 From an Office Copy of the Codioil ia the Registry of the University, 
Vol. xxxix. 82. 2. 

C. 16 



242 



Slade Professor of Fine Art 



Blade Pro- 
feasoxBhipe 
of Fine 
Art to be 
founded. 



Death of 
testator. 



Will proved. 



Trustees 
oflfered 
bequest to 
Cambrldger 



Which wai 
accepted. 



Transfer of 
Stock. 



sufficient for the purpose not exceeding altogether the sum of £35,000 
to found and endow within two years after his decease three or more 
professorships for promoting the study of the Fine Arts to be termed 
"The Slade Professorships of Fine Art" one of such Professorships 
being founded and endowed in the University of Oxford another in the 
University of Cambridge and one or more in the University College 
London the amount of the sum to be expended in founding and 
endowing each of such Professorships being in each case at the discretion 
of his said Trustees and Executors it being also at their discretion 
whether the sums should be equal or unequal in amount And each of 
such Professorships should be founded and endowed upon such terms 
and imder such regulations and provisions as should be agreed upon 
between his Trustees and Executors and the University or College in 
which the same should be founded and endowed. 

And whereas the said Testator died on the 29th day of March 1868 
without having altered his said Will save so far as the same was altered 
by the said recited Codicil and by six other Codicils thereto and without 
altering the said recited Codicil and the said other Codicils and the 
same Will and Codicils were on the Slst day of April 1868 proved by 
the said Executors in the Principal Registry of Her Majesty's Court of 
Probate And whereas the said Edward Weyman Wadeson Charles 
CoUambell Richard Fisher and Augustus Wollaston Franks as such 
Trustees and Executors as aforesaid in pursuance of the trust so reposed 
in them and in their discretion have proposed and offered to transfer 
the sum of £12,000 3 per cent Consolidated Annuities to the Chancellor 
Masters and Scholars of the said University of Cambridge for the 
purpose of founding and endowing a Professorship of Fine Art at the 
said University of Cambridge upon the terms and subject to the 
conditions contained in the Schedule hereto annexed and the said 
Chancellor Masters and Scholars have agreed to accept such offer ; 

Now this Indenture witnesseth and it is hereby agreed and declared 
that the said Edward Weyman Wadeson Charles Collambell Richard 
Fisher and Augustus Wollaston Franks (hereinafter called "the Donors") 
shall transfer to the said Chancellor Masters and Scholars the said sum 
of £12,000 3 per cent Consolidated Annuities and that the said 
Chancellor Masters and Scholars shall at all times hereafter stand 
possessed of the said sum of Stock upon the trusts and subject to the 
terms and conditions contained in the said Schedule hereto annexed 
In witness whereof the saidEdward Weyman Wadeson Charles Collambell 
Richard Fisher and Augustus Wollaston Franks have hereunto set 
their respective hands and seals and the said Chancellor Masters and 
Scholars have caused their common seal to be hereunto affixed the day 
and year first above written. 



founded. 



Deed of Trust 243 



The Schedule above referred to. 

1. When and as soon as the above-mentioned sum of £12,000 siadePro- 
3 per cent. Consolidated Annuities shall have been transferred to the to be^ 
Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge there 
shall be established in the said University of Cambridge a Professorship 

to be called "The Slade Professorship of Fine Art." 

2. The Professor shall be elected by a Board consisting of four Mode of 
members resident at Cambridge and three non-resident. 

3. The members resident at Cambridge shall be the Vice-chancellor Eiecton. 
for the time being and three persons on the Electoral Roll of the said Realdent. 
University who shall be appointed from time to time by Grace of the 
Senate and shall remain members of the Board as long as their names 

are on the said Electoral Boll unless they shall have previously resigned 
or become incapable to act. If one of the members so appointed be 
elected Vice-Chancellor, his place on the Board shall be filled so long 
as he shall continue to hold the Office of Vice-Chancellor by the last 
preceding Vice-Chancellor who is not a member of the Board. 

4 The non-resident members shall be the President for the time Non- 
being of the Royal Academy of London — the President for the time 
being of University College London — and the said Augustus Wollaston 
Franks nominated for life by the Donors. 

6. The Donors or the survivors or survivor of them may before or T^t *» to 

oe done on 
within Six Calendar Months after the resignation or death of the said the death of 

Augustus Wollaston Franks nominate by deed some Office not in the 

University of Cambridge the holder of which shall succeed to the place 

of the said Augustus Wollaston Franks on the Board when vacant and 

in default of such nomination the Senate of the said University shall 

nominate an Office not in the said University ^ 

6. If any of the Offices of which the tenure shall constitute a What !• to 
member of the Board shall be abrogated or if in any other way there any ooeUfj- 
shall arise a permanent vacancy on the Board the Senate of the ai^uah^ 
University shall by Grace nominate some Office the holder of which 

shall become a member of the Board preserving always the number of 
resident and non-resident members Provided always that if any elector 
or electors shall decline or n^lect or be unable to act the other electors 
shall constitute a full and perfect Board. 

7. The Professor shall be elected by a majority of the votes of the Prowdnreat 
electors who may either vote in person or transmit their votes in 
writing to the Vice-Chancellor. The Vice-Chancellor or his duly 

1 In accordanoe with this Begolation the Director for the time being of 
the Art Maseom, Sooth Kensington, has become a non-resident Elector to 
the ProfesBorship in the place of the late Sir A. W. Franks. Report of 
ComtcU of SenaUt 21 February; Grace 12 May 1898. 

16—2 



244 



Slade Professor of Fine Art 



Fini 
electloiL 



BabMqnent 
eleofeiona. 



Vtoe-Cluui- 
oellortogiye 
notice of (U7 
of election. 



Tenareof 
office to be 
three yean 



Pxofeesorto 
reoelTe all 
the dlTl- 
dendson 
the Fund. 



Reeidenoe 
notnecee- 
«ry. 



Number 
of annual 
lectnrea 



appointed deputy shall be Chairman of the Board and in case of an 
equality of votes shall have a second or casting vote. On any business 
other than the election of a Professor the electors shall only vote when 
present If any of the electors should at any time be a candidate for 
the Professorship such elector or electors shall have no voice or vote 
for the election on that occasion. 

8. The first election of a Professor shall take place within two 
months from the date of the establishment of such Professorship unless 
the two months expire in the time of vacation in which case the election 
may be deferred to a day in the ensuing term provided that the first 
Professor be elected before the end of the year 1869 and after the 
election of the first Professor whenever a vacancy shall occur of such 
Professorship a new election shall take place within two months from 
the date of such vacancy the period of vacation not being reckoned in 
the calculation. The day of election shall be fixed by the Vice- 
chancellor. 

9. The Vice-Chancellor shall give public notice of the day for the 
first election and of any future vacancy and of the day for electing a 
new Professor to such vacancy by fixing a notice on the door of the 
Public Schools at Cambridge and also by advertisement in the " Times " 
or other London Newspaper and the day of election shall be not sooner 
than 28 days nor later than 56 days after the date of the notice the 
period of vacation not being reckoned in the calculation and the Vice- 
Chancellor shall also so far as practicable send notice of the day and 
hour of the election to each of the electors by post to his official 
residence or last known place of abode in England. 

10. The Professor shall be elected for three years to be reckoned 
from the time at which his stipend shall become payable to him (as 
provided hereafter) but a person who has ceased to be Professor shall 
be re-eligible. 

11. The Professorship shall be endowed with the said sum of 
£12,000 3 per cent consolidated Annuities to be transferred by the 
Donors to the Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the University of 
Cambridge and to be called "The Slade Professorship Fund^' and the 
Professor shall receive by way of stipend the whole of the dividends 
and income of the said Fund subject to the payment thereout of 
incidental expenses (if any) and subject to the conditions hereinafter 
contained. 

12. The Professor shall not be called upon to reside at the 
University unless the stipend attached to the Professorship shall have 
been increased to not less than the sum of £500 per annum. 

13. It shall be the duty of the Professor to give annually in the 
University in some place to be appointed from time to time by the 
Vice-Chancellor a course of not less than twelve lectures on the History 
Theory and Practice of the Fine Arts or of some section or sections of 
them and no lecture shall be twice delivered. The lectures shall be 



Deed of Trust 246 

given in full term and shall be open to all Members of the University 
free of charge the Professor may however deliver extra courses of 
lectures for which he shall be entitled to charge such a fee for 
attendance as may from time to time be fixed by Grace of the Senate. 

14 The Professor shall give public notice of the time and place ProfwBoi'B 
and subject of his intended lectures in the printed form usually issued 
by other professors a fortnight at least before the commencement of 
each course of his lectures. 

15. If by reason of sickness or other sufficient cause to be approved Board of 
in writing by the Vice-chancellor the Professor be temporarily pre- appoint 
vented from discharging his duties he shall name a fit and sufficient ^^P^^^r- 
deputy to be approved by the Board of electors and in case of his 
declining or failing so to do the Board of electors shall appoint such 
deputy. It shall rest in all cases with the Board to determine what 
proportion of the Professor's stipend shall be assigned to the deputy. 

16. Upon the death resignation or retirement from office of a Apportion- 
Professor the current income of the Slade Professorship Fund shall be income on 
fairly apportioned between himself his executors or administrators and * ^'•**°^- 
his successor and such successor shall be considered to come into office 
immediately upon such death resignation or retirement unless the 

same shall have occurred three calendar months or upwards prior to 
his own appointment and in such case so much of the ciurent income 
as may be attributable to the period during which the Professorship 
shall have been vacant shall not be paid to such successor but shall go 
in augmentation of the Trust fund and be invested accordingly and 
such income as may upon a fair apportionment be attributable to the 
interval which shall elapse between the establishment of the Professor- 
ship and the first appointment of a Professor shall if such interval 
amounts to or exceeds three calendar months go and be invested in like 
manner but if such interval be less than three calendar months such 
income shall belong and be paid to the Professor first appointed and 
accepting office. 

17. The Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the University of Univerrity 
Cambridge shall have power with the consent of the Donors or the mleJ '"^ 
survivors or survivor of them and with the unanimous consent of the 

Board of Electors in writing to alter or vary any of the above rules and 

regulations and to make any additional rules and regulations by Grace 

of Senate Provided that no such alterations or additions shall be made PiotIm). 

in the beforementioned Rules and Regulations numbered respectively 

1 2 11 and 12. 

18. It shall be lawful for the Chancellor Masters and Scholara of invertmenti 

nay be 
the University of Cambridge but with the consent of the Donors or the changed 

survivors or survivor of them (if and so long as they or any of them 

shall so long live) and with the unanimous consent of the Board of 

electors from time to time to transfer the trust-stock for the time being 

or any part thereof into or for any other government stock or funds 



246 Blade Professor of Fine Art 

(except terminable annuities) ; and ako to sell and convert the trust- 
stock for the time being or any part thereof into money and to invest 
land may be the net money arising from such sale or conversion in the purchase of 
^^ ^' any freehold copyhold or customary manors messuages lands tenements 
or hereditaments in England or Wales for any estate of inheritance to 
be conveyed or surrendered or assigned to the said Chancellor Masters 
and Scholars of the University of Cambridge upon trust that the said 
Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the said University may sell the 
said manors messuages lands tenements and hereditaments either 
together or in parcels and either by public auction or private contract 
and either with or without any special stipulations as to title or 
evidence or commencement of title or. otherwise and may buy in or 
rescind or vary any contract for sale and re-sell without being answer- 
able for loss occasioned thereby and may for the purposes aforesaid or 
any of them execute and do all such assurances and things as they 
shall think fit And shall stand possessed of the monies to arise from 
any such sale (after payment thereout of the costs attending any 
exercise of the powers herein contained) Upon the same trusts and 
with under and subject to the same powers provisoes agreements and 
declarations (including the said power of purchasing hereditaments) as 
the money laid out in the purchase of such manors messuages lands 
tenements or hereditaments as aforesaid would then have been subject 
to if the same had not been so laid out And shall in the meantime 
and until all such manors messuages lands tenements or hereditaments 
shall be sold pay or apply the rents and profits thereof or of the part 
thereof for the time being remaining unsold to the person for the 
purposes and in the manner to whom and for and in which the divi- 
dends interest and income of the trust premises applied in the purchase 
thereof as aforesaid would have been payable or applicable under the 
trusts hereinbefore declared in case such purchase had not been made, 
it being hereby agreed and declared that the manors messuages lauds 
tenements and hereditaments which shall be purchased under this 
present power shall when purchased be considered as money and be 
subject to the same trusts in all respects as the money laid out in the 
purchase thereof would for the time being have been subject to if the 
same had not been so laid out Provided nevertheless and it is hereby 
agreed and declared that the said Chancellor Masters and Scholars of 
the University of Cambridge imtil all the said purchased manors 
messuages lands tenements and hereditaments shall be sold as afore- 
said shall or may with such consent as aforesaid demise the same or 
any part or parts thereof at rack-rent for any tenn of years to take 
effect on possession or within six calendar months from the making of 
the demised 



1 From the original in the Begistiy of the Univeraity, Box N, No. 29. 



Professor of Eocperimental Physics 247 



23. Experimental Physics. 
1871. 

In 1868 (25 November) a Syndicate was appointed to 
consider the whole question of teaching in the department 
of Heat, Electricity, and Magnetism. This step was taken at 
that particular time because "in the scheme of examination 
for Honours in the Mathematical Tripos, approved by Grace 
of the Senate on the 2nd June, 1868, Heat, Electricity, and 
Magnetism, if not introduced for the first time, had a much 
greater degree of importance assigned to them than at any 
previous period, and these subjects will henceforth demand a 
corresponding amount of attention from the candidates for 
Mathematical Honours^" 

This Sjmdicate issued a report 27 February, 1869, which 
proposed a scheme divided under four heads: (1) a Professor- 
ship of Experimental Physics; (2) a Demonstrator; (3) an 
Attendant; (4) Instruments and apparatus; to which was 
virtually added (5) a Laboratory at an estimated cost of 
£5,000. In conclusion they suggested the appointment of a 
special Syndicate to deal with the finance of their scheme. 
Such a Syndicate was accordingly appointed, 13 May, 1869, 
and issued two reports dated 29 March and 31 May, 1870. 
When these were discussed by the Senate, they met with 
an unfavourable reception, and the whole scheme might 
have fallen to the ground, had not a munificent oflfer, 
made by His Grace the Duke of Devonshire, Chancellor, to 
build the Laboratory at his own cost, coincided with a 
reduction in the expenditure of the University Chest eflfe^ted 
by raising by assessment the quotas of the University and 
Colleges levied under the Cambridge Improvement Acts^ 

Finally, the establishment of 'a Professorship of Experi- 

^ This sentence ocoars in the Beport of the Syndicate dated 27 Feb. 
1869. Registry, Vol. xxxix. 33. 5. 

* Order of Yioe-Ohancellor and Heads of Colleges, 28 Oct 1870 {ReporUr, 
p. 57); reissued by Coancil of Senate, 31 Oct. (Ibid. p. 58), and confirmed by 
Grace 17 Nov. (Ibid. p. 91). 



248 Mechcmism cmd Applied Mechanics 

mental Physics" was approved by Grace 9 February, 1871*; 
and the first Professor was elected 8 March. 

The Professor, who is now styled " The Cavendish Pro- 
fessor of Experimental Physics," is governed by Statute B*. 



24. Mechanism and Applied Mechanics. 
1876. 

The death of the Rev. Robert Willis (28 February, 1875), 
who as Jacksonian Professor (1837-75) had lectured on 
Mechanism, and the decision of the Senate that the Jack- 
sonian Professorship should in future be regarded as a chair 
of Chemistry, left the University without provision for 
instruction in Mechanism. A Syndicate was therefore 
appointed, 29 April, 1875, " to consider whether any and if 
any what steps should be taken for establishing a Professor- 
ship of Mechanism and Engineering'." This Sjmdicate 
reported in favour of the establishment of a Professorship of 
Mechanism and Applied Mechanics, 6 May, 1875*, and their 
report was confirmed by Grace 28 October, but not without 
opposition^ The first Professor was elected 17 November. 

The Professorship id now governed by Statute B. 

26. Ecclesiastical History (Dixie). 
1882. 

Sir Wolstan Dixie, who died 1594, left by Will a sum 
of money to Emmanuel College to buy land for the endow- 
ment of two fellowships and two scholarships to be held by 
scholars of the school built and partly endowed by himself 
at Bosworth in Leicestershire*. 

In 1878 (12 December) the Governing Body of Emmanuel 
College made new statutes for the Dixie foundation, which 

1 ReporUr, 8 Feb. 1871, pp. 176, 189. 

* The history of the laboratory wiU be given below, in conneotion with 
the rest of the Museums of Science. 

« Reporter, 4 May, 1876, p. 371. * Ibid. 11 May, p. 386. 

» Ibid. 2 Nov. 1876, p. 72. The numbers were: Placet 74, Non Placet 86. 

• Diet, of Nat. Biogr. xv. 122. 



Ely Professor of Divinity 249 

were approved by the Queen in Council 26 February, 1880. 
In virtue of these the fellowships were abolished, and it was 
enacted that the surplus income of the Dixie estates should 
not, as heretofore, be spent on the purchase of advowsons*. 

In 1882 (3 May) the Queen approved a statute for the 
University and Emmanuel College in common, in virtue of 
which there was " established in the University a Professor- 
ship to be called the Dixie Professorship of Ecclesiastical 
History*." 

The Vice-Chancellor declared the Professorship vacant 
18 April, 1884, and the first Professor was elected 17 May, 
1884\ 



26. Divinity (Ely). 

1882. 

The action of the Governing Body of Trinity College in 
respect of the canonry in the Cathedral Church of Ely which 
had been attached to the Regius Professorship of Greek in 
1848, has been already related*. On receipt of the Resolution 
passed by the College the Council of the Senate issued a 
report dated 10 June, 1878", in which they recommended 
(among other things) : 

That with a view to the acceptance of the offer of the Master aud 
Fellows of Trinity College, a Statute be prepared for attaching the 
Canonry of Ely to a new Professorship of Divinity, to be called the Ely 
Professorship of Divinity. 

This report was confirmed by Grace 5 December, 1878', 
and the new Professorship was accepted by the Commissioners, 
who made for it the statute by which it is now governed 
(Statute B, Chapter XIV). 

The Vice-Chancellor announced (23 April, 1889), " that 
the electors would meet for the purpose of proceeding to 
the election of a Professor on Saturday June 1'"; and on 
that day Mr Stanton was elected the first Professor. 

1 Univ. and CoU, SuUuUt, 1883, pp. 651—654. 

' StatuUt, ed. 1896, p. 68. * Reporter, 20 May, p. 746. 

* See above, p. 166. » Reporter, 29 October, 1878, p. 88. 

• Ibid. 10 Beoember, p. 246. 7 Ibid. 24 AprU, 1889, p. 636. 



250 Physiology^ Surgery 



27. Physiology. 
1883. 

In 1870 (23 June) leave was given by Grace to Mr Michael 
Foster, who had lately been elected Praelector in Physiology 
in Trinity College, to give "lectures in Physiology in one 
of the rooms in the New Museums Building, for such time 
and subject to such Regulations as the Syndicate may think 
fitV 

As it is provided in Statute B, Chapter VI, that a Pro- 
fessorship in Physiology (among others) shall be established, 
the Council of the Senate, soon after the reception of the 
statute, consulted the General Board of Studies as to the 
order in which the Professorships should be filled up. They 
passed the following Minute dated 11 December, 1882: 

This Board considers that the Professorships established by Statute B 
ch. VI. § 2 should be filled up in the following order: (1) Physiology, 
(2) Pathology, (3) Mental Philosophy and Logic, and that the appoint- 
ment to the first two Professorships is urgent 

This Minute was embodied in a report dated 12 March, 
1883, with the further recommendation "that immediate 
steps be taken for the appointment of a Professor of 
Physiology*." This report having been confirmed by Grace 
10 May', Mr Foster was chosen the first Professor 11 June. 



28. SUEGEEY. 

1883. 

In 1878 the Board of Medical Studies, in a communication 
addressed to the Studies Syndicate (29 March), unanimously 
recommended the establishment of a Professorship of Surgery; 
a recommendation which they repeated in 1883, in the 

I Grace Book T, p. 97. 

' Reporter, 18 Maroh, 1888, p. 478. 

s Ibid. 16 May, p. 684. 



FcUhology 261 

following words : " the appointment of a Professor of Surgery 
is urgently necessary." The Council of the Senate laid this 
matter before the University in a report dated 12 March, 
1883, with Dr Humphry's oflfer to hold the Professorship 
without stipend*. 

This report was not offered for confirmation, but a Grace 
was introduced (10 May) to establish "a Professorship of 
Surgery in accordance with the provisions of Statute B, 
Chap. VI," and proposing regulations*. This Grace passed 
the Senate without opposition, and (20 June) Dr Humphry 
was elected the first Professor*. 



29. Pathology. 
1883. 

In 1879 a memorial was addressed to the University 
Commissioners, signed by 138 graduates of the University, 
" engaged in the study or practice of Medicine," praying that 
in the new Statutes for the University provision might be 
made for an extension of the study of Medical Science, 
and especially of Pathology, Medicine, and Surgery. Of the 
first of these they say : 

...the Science of Pathology, in addition to its value as an essential 
part of the complete study of Medicine, has now attained such 
precision, proportions, and general importance, and offers such great 
promise of future development, that it seems to us fairly to demand 
recognition as one of the foremost subjects in the sphere of University 
work*. 

The provision for a Professor of Pathology (among others) 
in Statute B, Chapter VI, and the action of the Council of 
the Senate thereon, has been already related under Physiology. 
That Professorship having been established, the General 
Board of Studies reverted to the subject of Pathology in two 

> Reporter, 13 Biarch, p* 479. 
< Ibid. 15 May, p. 683. 
s Ibid. 25 June, p. 1001. 
« BegiBtry, Vol. tttit. 40. 1. 



262 Mental Philosophy afid Logic 

reports, dated 11 June* and 19 November*, 1883. The first 
recommendation in the latter report was embodied by the 
Council of the Senate in the following Grace : 

That Recommendation 1 in the Amended Report, dated Nov. 19, 
1883, of the Qeneral Board of Studies, respecting the appointment of a 
Professor of Pathology, be confirmed. 

This Grace passed the Senate 6 December, 1883*; and 
the Vice-Chancellor having declared the Professorship to be 
vacant 18 April, 1884, the first Professor was elected 26 April. 



30. Mental Philosophy and Logic. 

1896, 

The action of the Council and the General Board of 

Studies with reference to the three Professorships provided 

in Statute B, Chapter VI, of which Mental Philosophy and 

Logic is one, has been already related*. 

Li 1896 (16 June) the General Board of Studies 
recommended : 

That steps be taken for the immediate appointment of a Professor 
of Mental Philosophy and Logic ^ 

After this report had been drawn up Dr Sidgwick, 
Knightbridge Professor, wrote to the Vice-Chancellor (3 June) 
oflFering to give £200 a year towards the salary of the 
proposed Professor. This generous offer was embodied in 
an Amended Report of the General Board of Studies 
(18 November, 1896)', which was confirmed by Grace 
10 December, but not without opposition'. 

31. Chinese, 
1897. 

In 1886 (11 October) Sir Thomas Francis Wade, formerly 
of Trinity College, offered to the University, in a letter to 

^ Reporter, 13 Jane, 1883, p. 856. < Ibid. 23 November, p. 202. 

* Ibid. 11 December, p. 272. « See above, pp. 250, 251. 

s Ibid. 16 June, 1896, p. 1006. • Ibid. 1 December, p. 261. 

7 Ibid. 15 December, p. 349. Placet, 128 ; Non Placet^ 71. 



Professor of Chinese 268 

the Vice-Chancellor, his collection of Chinese books*. This 
valuable gift was accepted with thanks (26 November) ; and 
the honorary degree of Doctor in Letters was conferred on 
the Donor". 

In the following year (12 December) the Council of the 
Senate recommended " the institution of a Professorship of 
Chinese," which had already been urged upon the University 
in 1876 by the Board of Oriental Studies, on learning, as 
they said, " that the same excellent Chinese Scholar to whom 
the University is indebted for the gift of the large and 
valuable collection of Chinese literature... is willing to under- 
take without any stipend the duties of a Chinese Professor 
...and to accept all the regulations concerning residence and 
lectures to which the Professors who are under the statutes 
of 1882 are subject*." Their recommendation, including 
regulations for the Professorship, the first of which was that 
it should terminate with the tenure of oflBce of the Professor 
first elected, was confirmed by Grace 9 February, 1888* ; and 
Sir T. F. Wade was elected the first Professor 21 April, 
1888. 

Sir T. F. Wade died 31 July, 1895, and in 1897 (7 June) 
the Council of the Senate, with the concurrence of the 
Library Syndicate, and the Boards for Indian Civil Sendee 
and Oriental Studies, recommended "that there be estab- 
lished in the University a Professorship in Chinese in 
accordance with the provisions of Statute B, Chap. VI'." 
This recommendation, with regulations for the Professorship, 
was confirmed by Grace 28 October, 1897*. 

In 1899 (10 May) the General Board of Studies proposed 
that this Professorship should be subject to the general 
regulations for the residence and duties of Professors ap- 
proved 18 June, 1886', and that the Professor should have 
a stipend of £200 a ye€u:^ This report was confirmed by 
Grace 8 June, 1899. 

1 ReporUr, 19 October, p. 43. « Ibid. 30 November, pp. 208, 269. 

* Ibid. 13 December, 1887, p. 248. * Ibid. 14 February, p. 408. 

• Ibid. 8 June, 1897, p. 1078. • Ibid. 2 November, p. 160. 

7 Ordinances, ed. 1901, p. 451. 

8 Reporter, 16 May 1899, p. 874. Ordinaftcen, ed. 1901, p. 428. 



264 Professor of Andeiit History 

32. Ancient History. 
1898. 

In 1898 (18 May) the General Board of Studies issued a 
report drawing the attention of the University to the need 
for teaching in Ancient History, which had been repeatedly 
pressed upon them by the Special Boards for Claseics and 
for History and Archaeology*. They concluded by recom- 
mending "that there be established in the University a 
Professorship of Ancient History in accordance with the 
provisions of Statute B/' and suggesting regulations. The 
report was confirmed by Grace 27 October, 1898'; and the 
first Professor was elected 4 February, 1899. 



33. Agriculture. 
1899. 

The connexion of the University with Agricultural 
Education originated with the following letter*, addressed 
to the Chancellor by Mr Henry Chaplin, President of the 
Board of Agriculture : 

3, St Jambs's Square, London, S.W. 
25<A Jnly, 1890. 

My Dear Duke, 

It is no doubt within your knowledge that the Board of 
Agriculture, under the powers conferred upon it by the Act of last 
year, is charged with certain duties in respect of Agricultural 
Education. 

The efforts which are being made in the country to afford increased 
flftcilities in Agricultural Education are, in one sense, highly encouraging. 
They show that the Fanners of the present day are becoming alive to 
the necessity which exists for scientific knowledge in order to enable 
them to hold their own in these days of keen competition. 

While, however, there is this laudable desire among the fSEuming 
community for greater knowledge of the teachings of Science, the means 
of satisfying that desire by the aid of highly trained teachers seem at 
present unequal to the demand. 

1 Reporter, 24 May 1898, p. 835. ' Ibid. 1 November, 1898, p. 178. 

* Ibid. 7 October, 1890, p. 26. 



Professor of Agriculture 266 

An agricultural teacher to be successful must be master not only 
of the ordinary methods of agricultural practice, but must in addition 
have an intimate acquaintance with those Sciences, such as Chemistry, 
Botany, Geology, Biology, &c., upon the principles of which a correct 
and intelligent practice of the Art of Agriculture mainly rests. 

It has occurred to me that if the University of Cambridge, rich in 
the means at its disposal for instruction in the Sciences I have 
mentioned, was willing to make some provision for the training of such 
Teachers, it might materially assist the Board of Agriculture in its 
endeavour to promote Agricultural Education. 

It is in your capacity as Chancellor of the University that I venture 
to approach you on this subject, for I am very confident that if the 
Senate was disposed to consider this suggestion and to devote some 
part of its resources in furtherance of this branch of Education, the 
University would be the means of supplying a want which is at present 
greatly felt, and would render most valuable assistance to the cause of 
Agriculture in this country. 

I am, [etc.] 

HENRY CHAPLIN. 

A Syndicate was appointed (6 November) to consider the 
subject of this letter, and to report to the Senate before the 
end of the Lent Term, 1891 \ They published an elaborate 
scheme of teaching and examinations (11 March)^ but it was 
not presented to the Senate for confirmation. A second 
report (28 May)*, in which the part of the scheme dealing 
with teaching was remodelled, shared the same fate. In a 
third report (27 October)* the Syndics were able to announce 
that the Cambridgeshire Coimty Council was willing, under 
certain conditions, to make an annual grant of £400 "towards 
the establishment and maintenance of scientific instruction 
in subjects bearing upon agriculture''; and suggested the 
appointment of two lecturers in Agricultural Science, one of 
whom should be also Director of Agricultural Studies. 
These proposals, however, were rejected by the Senate 
25 February, 1892». 

In 1893, stimulated by the action of the County Councils 
of Cambridgeshire and the adjacent counties, and of the 

1 Reporter, 11 November, 1890, p. 203. ' Ibid. 17 March, 1891, p. 661. 

* Ibid. 2 JoDO, p. 892. « Ibid. 8 November, p. 145. 

• Ibid. 1 March, 1892, p. 580. Non Placet, 103; Placet, 91. 



266 Professor of Agriculture 

Board of Agriculture, who oflfered pecuniary grants to start 
and work the scheme, the Senate agreed "to establish an 
examination in Agricultural Science, and to grant a diploma 
connected therewith under the supervision of a special 
managing Syndicate" (Grace 9 November, 1893)\ 

In 1899 the General Board of Studies, in a report dated 
1 February, recommended, among other things, the estab- 
lishment, for ten years, of a Department of Agriculture 
under the direction of a Professor*. This action was due 

(1) to a generous oflfer of £2000 by Sir Walter Gilbey, Bart. ; 

(2) to a promise of increased help from the Board of 
Agriculture and the above-mentioned County Councils; 

(3) to an offer of the Drapers' Company contained in the 
following letter addressed to the Chancellor : 

Drapers' Hall, London, KC. 
6th January, 1899. 
Mt Lord Duke, 

I have the honour to inform jour Qrace that the Court of 
Assistants of the Drapers' Company, at a meeting held yesterday, 
resolved to grant from the corporate funds of the Company the sum of 
eight hundred pounds per annum for ten years, as the stipend of a 
Professor of Agriculture in the University of Cambridge ; it being 
understood that the University will make all necessary arrangements 
for the organisation and equipment of a Department of Agriculture 
and for the maintenance of the Department during the period covered 
by the Company's subscription. The Court of Assistants hope and 
believe that the anticipations formed by your Qrace and other au- 
thorities of the University of the public usefulness and importance of 
the proposed Department of Agriculture will be fuUy realised. 

I have the honour to be, [etc.] 

W. P. SAWYER, Clerks 

The recommendations of this report were confirmed by 
Grace 2 March, 1899*; and the establishment of a Professor- 
ship, subject to certain regulations, was approved by Grace 

1 Report of Council of Senate, 16 May, 1893 (Reporter, p. 816), confirmed 
by Grace 1 Jane (Ibid. p. 936) ; Report 8 June of Syndicate appointed by the 
above Grace (Ibid. p. 1010), confirmed by Grace 9 November (Ibid. p. 187). 

* Reporter, 7 February, 1899, p. 608. 

* This letter was printed in the above report. 

* Reporter, 7 March, p. 648. 



Farm lent by Mr M^acfarlane-Ghrieve 267 

11 May following*. The first Professor was elected 21 July, 
1899*. 

In 1900 (7 June) W. A. Macfarlane-Grieve, M.A., of Clare 
College, after conference with Professor Somerville, oflFered to 
place at the disposal of the University a farm on his estate 
of about 145 acres, for the purposes of the Department of 
Agriculture*. This offer was accepted, and thanks returned 
to Mr Macfarlane-Qrieve, in the following Graces, which 
passed the Senate 14 June, 1900* : 

1. That the offer contained in the letter, dated 7 June 1900, from 
W. A Macfarlane-Qrieve, MA., of Clare College, to the Vice-Chancellor, 
to place a farm at Impington at the disposal of the University, for the 
purposes of the Department of Agriculture, free of rent from Michaelmas 
1900 until Michaelmas 1909, be gratefully accepted ; that the general 
management of the farm be assigned to the Board of Agricultural 
Studies ; and that the entire cost of its administration be defrayed 
from the funds at the disposal of the Board. 

2. That the yice-Chancellor be authorised to convey to Mr 
Macfarlane-Qrieve the thanks of the University for his generous 
benefaction. 

' Reporter^ 16 May, p. 880. The regulations are printed in Ordinaneet, 
ed. 1901, p. 429. 

> Ibid. 8 October, 1899, p. 2. 

' The offer was contained in a letter to the Vice-Chanoellor (Reporter, 

12 Jane, 1900, p. 1024). 

« Ibid. 16 June, p. 1116. 



17 



V. 

LECTURESHIPS AND 
EEADERSHIPS 



17—2 



Benefdction of Sir Robert Rede 261 



1. Benefaction of Sir Robert Rede. 
1524. 

Robert Rede was educated at Buckingham College, the 
predecessor of Magdalene College, and afterwards became 
fellow of King's Hall. In 1495 he was knighted; and in 
1506 appointed Chief Justice of the Common Pleas. King 
Henry the Seventh also made him one of his executors. 
King Henry the Eighth continued him in his judicial office, 
which he held till his death, 8 January 1518-19*. 

His executors, by deed dated 10 December, 1524 (printed 
below), purchased of the abbot and convent of Waltham Holy 
Cross an annuity of twenty marks, to be paid to the Master 
and Fellows of Jesus College, who bound themselves in their 
turn to pay £4 to each of three persons, who should read 
lectures in the common schools of the University on Humanity, 
Logic, and Philosophy. It is evident, from the language of 
the deed, that the lectures here referred to are the "ordinary 
lectures" prescribed in one of the Stati£ta Antiqua^ by which, 
all students are required to attend lectures on Terence for 
two years, on Logic for one yecur, and on the physics and 
metaphysics of Aristotle for one year. Sir Robert Rede was 
the first to give a fixed stipend to the lecturers. The 
amount of this stipend was probably fixed by that of the 
Mathematical Lecturer, who, by another of the Statvta 
Antiquary received £4 annually from the common cheat. 

The lecturers or, as they are called in the deed, the 

^ For Sir Robert Rede's Life see a paper by Rev. T. Brocklebank, M.A., 
FeUow of King's College, in Camh. Ant. Soc. Comm. i. 366; Cooper's Atherug, 
i. 20 ; Diet, of Nat. Biogr. xlvii. 373. 

* Statuta AtUiqua, No. liO ; Comm. DocU. i. 384. See also Oh$ervaHont 
on the Statutes, by G. Peacock, Bvo. 1841, App. A, p. iv, note. 

> Statuta Antiqua, No. 136. 



262 Benefaction of Sir Robert Rede 

readers, were to be appointed in the first instance by the 
executors, and after their death "to be chosen after the 
laudable custome and vsage of the Vniuersitie" on 10 June, 
or within two days next after. The lectures are to be called 
"free lectures," and "shalbe for euer read franck and free to 
all manner of schollers of the said Yniversitie hearing or 
bounde to hear the same." The readers are to pray for the 
soul of Sir Robert Rede ; and once a year (20 January) " a 
solempne Anniversarie" is to be celebrated for him in Great 
S. Maj/s Church. 

These lecturers, as they were usually appointed on 
S. Barnabas Day (11 June), were commonly known as "The 
Bamaby Lecturers^" 

In 1857 the Council of the Senate issued a report 
(27 April) in which they stated that "for many years past 
no duties whatever have been discharged by any of the 
Lecturers" on the foundation of Sir R. Rede. They therefore 
recommended that application should be made to the 
Commissioners " to authorize the University to suspend for 
one year the election of the said three Lecturers*." This 
report having been confirmed by Grace 30 April, 1857, and 
a petition under seal having been sent to the Commissioners 
(28 May), who assented by a document under their seal 
(13 June) to the suspension prayed for, the Council proposed 
a new statute (25 November) which was confirmed by the 
Senate 10 December*. The first lecture under the new 
arrangement was delivered in the Senate House by Professor 
Richard Owen, 10 May, 1859. 

Declaration of Ti-ust, dated 10 December, 1524. 

Sedeed!' This Indenture tripartite, made between the Right Reverend Father 

in God, John, Byshopp of Rochester, Chauncellor of the Yniversitie of 
Cambridge, Vioe-Chauncellor, and the R^^entes and Non-Regentes of 
the same, on thone party; and Sir Robert Brudenell, Knight^ cheif 
Justice to the King our Souereign Lord of his Common Bench at 
Westminster, Thomas Willughbie, one of the Sergeauntes at the lawe, 

1 Qonning, Ceremoniet, pp. 109—113. 

• Grace Book H, pp. 176, 176. 

> Stoma, ed. 1396, p. 109; Ordinances, ed. 1901, p. 616. 



Deed of Trust 



263 



Mr. William Capon, Doctor of holy Divinitie, Christopher Bland, 
Master in arte, and Sir William Gtefferey, Clerke, executors of the 
testament of Sir Robert Rede, Knight, deceased, and late the Kinges 
cheif Justice of the foresaid Common Bench, on the second parte; and 
Mr. William Capon, Doctor of holy Divinitie, and Master of the Colledge 
of our Blessed Ladye St Mary the Virgin, St John the Evangeliste, and 
St Radegunde, in the said Vniversitie of Cambridge, vulgarely called 
Jhesus Colledge, and the fellowes of the same Colledge, on the third 
parte, Witnesseth that yt is covenaunted, promised, and agreed between 
the said parties and everie of them in the manner and forme followinge, 
that is to say : 

Firste, that whereas the Right Reverend Father in Qod, John 
Malyn, Abbott of the ezempte monastery of Waltham Holy Crosse in 
the County of Essex, and the Convent of the same monastery, by their 
deed sufficient in the lawe under their common and convent seale, 
dated the first day of November the sixteenth yere of the reigne of our 
Souereigne Lord Henry the Eighth of England and Fraunce King, 
Defender of the Faith, and Lord of Ireland, graunted to the foresaid 
Mr. William Capon, Master of the said Colledge called Jhesus Colledge, 
and to the fellowes of the same CoUedge, a yerely annuity of twenty 
markes, the fyve day of Nouembre, and the fyve day of Maye, yerely, 
by even porcions to be paid, to have and yerely to perceive the same 
annuity of twenty markes to the said Master and the Fellowes of the 
same Colledge, and to their successors and assignes for ever,... the 
purchase of which annuitie to the said Master and FeUowes, and to 
their successors, was at the only costes and charges of the forenamed 
executors of the above-named Sir Robert Rede, and of the propre goods 
and money late the said Sir Robert Rede's, and was only to the vses 
and ententes hereafter ensuing, that is to say : 

Whereas there be three Lectures continually redde and kept in the 
terme tyme in the common Schooles of the said Vniversitie for Or- 
dinaryes to the students in arte there, that is to saye one Lecture in 
Humanitie, the second in Logique, and the third in Philosophie, 
naturall or morall; 

The said Chauncellor [etc] graunten for them and their successors, 
by theis presentes, to the foresaid other parties and to either of them, 
that the Readers of the foresaid three Lectures shalbe named and 
chosen by the forenamed executors, and if any of them decease, then by 
the survivors of them as long as any of them be on lyve ; and the same 
executors, and the survivors of them, at all times to have authoritie 
and power, for causes them moving, to dischardge the said Readers so 
elected and euery of them, and to electe and choose other to succeed 
them in their roomes and places ; 

And after the decease of all the said executors, all the said Readers 
to be chosen after the laudable custome and vsage of the said Vni- 
versitie ; 



The abbot 
and oonvent 
of Waltham 
HolyCrcMB 
havegntntod 
b7daed 
dated INOT. 
1534 an 
annnitr of 
SO marks 
to Jesofl 
GoUffige. 



Which an- 
nuity was 
bought I7 
SirRBade's 
ezecntoni 



Three leo- 
tureeintlie 
Common 
Scfaooia. 



TheBeaden 
of these to 
be elected 
and remov- 
ed by the 
execatom 



After their 
death by the 
University. 



264 Benefaction of Sir Robert Rede 



Election to 
take place 
10 June. 



Beadento 
bechoeen 
for merit 
onlj. 



Sachof 
the three 
Beadersto 
be paid ^64. 



WbatlB 
to be done 
when a 
Beaderdiee 
oroeaaesto 
lecture. 



Master and 
Fellows 
of Jesus 
College 
undertake 

thetnree 
BeadezB. 



The Univer- 
sitT and the 
CoUese 
promise the 
executors to 
take pains 
thatSe 
annuity be 
had. 



Except and provided alway, that the same election to be made 
and had the tenth day of June, or within two daies next after the said 

day, 

And that the said Readers so elected or instituted be of seuerall 
Sheires and seuerall countries borne, and of such scholers as shalbe 
thought most apt and hable for the said reading, and most profitable 
for the instruction of the scholers coming to the said Lectures, and 
indifferently to be chosen without any partialitie or favour to be 
shewed to any countrey or any particular scholer; 

And that the said Reader, reading in the said Lecture of Humanitie, 
and his successors reading like Lecture, shall haue for his and their 
labor and stipend for the yere four pounds of lawfull money, and the 
Reader of the said Lecture of Logique, and his successors reading like 
Lecture, to have for his and their labor and stipend for the yere other 
four poimds of lawfull money, and the Reader of the said Lecture of 
Philosophie, natiu^U or morall, and his successors reading like Lecture, 
to have for his and their labor and stipend for the yere other four 
pounds of lawfull money, by equall porcions at three times in the yere 
to be paid, that is to say, the last day of Christmas terme, the last day 
of Easter terme, and the last day of Michaelmas terme, to euery of the 
foresaid three Readers six and twenty shillings and eightpence ; 

And if any of the said Readers decease, or die, or for any other 
cause be departed or amoved from reading of the said Lectures, that 
then the foresaid choosours and electors, and their successors, shall 
choose, name, and admitt a new Reader within six dayes next following 
to the roome of the said Reader so departed, and the same election to 
be of him after the manner and form above expressed : 

And the same Master of the same Oolledge, called Jhesus GoUedge, 
and the Fellowes of the same Colledge, graunten and permitten by 
theis presentes to the other parties abovesaid, and to eyther of them, 
that they and their successors shall well and truly content of the fore- 
said annuity of twenty markes the foresaid somes of money to the fore- 
said three Readers yerely and quarterly, after the rate aboue limited, as 
long as they may enioy and have to them paid the foresaid annuity of 
twenty marks of lawfull money by the foresaid Abbott and Ck>nvent, 
and by their successors ; 

And the foresaid Chauncellor [etc.], and also the foresaid Master of 
the said Colledge of Jhesus and the Fellowes of the same, and euery of 
them, graimten and permitten by these presentes to the foresaid 
executors of the said Sir Robert Rede, and to their heyres, and to the 
heyres of euery of them, that they and their successors shall from 
henceforth endevour themselves to the best they can, at their propre 
costs and charges, to cause the same annuitie and rent of twenty marks 
well and truly yerely to be paid to the said Master and Fellowes of 
the said Colledge, and to their successors for euer hereafter, if any 
denyer of the seid annuitie of twenty marks be had : 



Deed of Trust 266 

And if the said Master and Fellowes, or their successors, fail of 
payment of the said money to the foresaid Readers, or to any of them 
in part or in all at the times of payment of the same after manner 
aboueeaid, that then the said Master and Fellowes, and their successors, 
shall forfeit and pay to the said Chauncellor [etc.], forty shillings of Forfeit for 
lawfull money in the name of a payne to be ymployed to the common- menCof tbe 
wealth and vse of the said Vniversitie : 

And that it shalbe lawfull to the said Chauncellor [etc.], to enter The Uni- 
into the landes and tenementes of the said Master and Fellowes in any dktrJLiT^ 
place whereinsoeuer they be, and there to distreyne, and the distresses 
there taken to lead, carry, and driue away, and the same to ympound 
and keep vnto the time the said Headers, and euery of them, be fully 
content and satisfied of their said money to them dew, and the said 
Chauncellor [etc.], be truly contented and payd of the foresaid fortye 
shillinges of lawfull money in the name of a payne as is abouesaid 
forfaite, also satisfied and paid.... 

And for this said money thus to be paid yerdy to the said three The lectozet 
Readers and to their successors the foresaid Chauncellor, [etc.], by the '^ 

common assent and consent of the body of the whole Vniversitie, also 
covenaunten graimten and permitten by these presents to the said 
Master and Fellowes of the foresaid CoUedge, and to their successors, 
and to the foresaid executors, and to their heyres, and to the heyres 
of euery of them, that the foresaid three Lectures shalbe called free 
Lectures, and shalbe from henceforth for euer re€ul fr^nck and free to 
all manner of schollers of the said Vniversitie hearing or bounde to 
hear the same Lectures, and to euery of them, without any other thinge 
to be paid for the same : And that the Chaimcellor or Vice-Chauncellor 
of the said Vniversitie, their substitute or substitutes, or any other 
Officer or Officers, as principalles or Readers, or any other, shall not at any 
other time hereafter demand, procure, haue or receyue, by themselves or 
by any other for them, any manner of money, gifbe, or other thinges, of 
any student or scholar for their Ordinaries or Lectures in Humanitie, 
Logique, or in Philosophic, naturall or morall, nor of any of them ; but 
the said Chauncellor [etc.] graunten and permitten by theis presentee,... 
that all the graduates of the said Vniversitie, Religiouse men and other, 
shall from henceforth be free, quit, and discharged for paying of any 
money, gift, or any other thinge for the said Ordinaries and Lectures 
and euery of them for euer. 

And that euery of the said scholars appointed for to read the said The BeMlen 
three Lectures called the Ordinaries in the middest of euery terme, when thecal of 
the scholars shalbe assembled together most in number by their esti- **** 'ounder. 
macion, shall say, and cause the same scholars to say, with an audible 
voyce openly, the Psalme of De profundU^ with the orisons and collects 
belonging thereto, and after saye : Anima Roberti Rede milttis defuncti 
nuper capitalis Jueticiarii Domird regis de cammum Banco fundatorii 
hujus Lecture^ et anima Domine Margarete consortis sney et an£me 



266 Benefaction of Sir Robert Rede 



Fines to be 
remitted. 



air Robert 
Bedetobe 
pntTedfor 
AS a bene- 
factor. 



A solemn 
•nniversary 
to be kept 
90 Janaai7 
in each year. 



TheVlce- 
CSianoellor 



other D.D. 
to conduct 
the service. 

All doctors 
and students 
to attend. 



One of the 
Proctonto 
read the 
Statutes 
of this 
foundation. 



<>mmumfiddium dsfunctorum per Dei ndeerioordiam in pace requie»cafU. 
Amen. 

Moreouer the said Chauncellor [etc.], oouenaunten and graunten,... 
that whensoever it shall happen at any time hereafter any scholar or 
scholars to he admitted to any d^ree in Art, as Bachelor or Maister, 
and the said scholar or scholars have not their full and compleate 
termes according to the statutes and ordinances of the said Vniuersitie 
for such degrees ordeyned, and thereupon their grace gotten to proceed, 
that the same scholar or scholars shall franckly and freely proceed to 
their degree whereunto he or they he admitted, and not hereafter to 
pay any fyne, emolument, money, or other fee or reward to the Chaun- 
cellor, Yice-Chauncellor, Proctors, Masters of Colleges, and Principals 
or Readers, or to any other person of the said Vniuersitie from hence- 
forth for the Ordinaries of such termes as the same scholar or scholars 
do so lack, but all parties to be satisfied and contented with such 
stipends or fees as be limited to the aforesaid Ordinaries. 

Also the said Chauncellor [etc.], covenaunten and graunten...that 
all graduates of the said Vniversitie of what degree that they be o^ 
in euery of their sermons called sermons ad Clerum hereafter to be 
made within the said Vniversitie, and also in euery of their sermons at 
Paules Crosse in London, shall specially and openly rehearse the name 
of the said Sir Robert Rede, there to be prayed for as one of the great 
benefactors of the said Vniversitie, beseeching the whole audience to 
have his said sowie in remembraunce, and specially to be prayed for, 
and hereto to make promise at the time of their admission. 

And the said Chauncellor [etc.], further couenaimten and graun- 
ten...that they.. .shall cause yerely to be kept a solempne Anniversarie 
on the twentieth day of January in the Vniversitie Church of the said 
Vniversitie, called St Marie Church, for the sowles of the said Sir 
Robert Rede, and dame Margarett his wyffe, and the sowles of their 
fathers and mothers, children, and all Christian sowles, in this manner 
following, that is to say, in the day before the said obite at aftemoone 
a solempne Dirige by note, and on the morrow next following a 
solempne Masse of Requiem by note, with lights and other exequies 
and solempnities thereto accustomed. 

And the Vice-Chancellor of the said Vniversitie, yf he be present, 
and in his absence some other honorable Doctor in Divinity of the said 
Vniversitie, to minister and doe the observaunces both at Dirige and 
at Masse of Requiem and to have for his labor therein sixteen pence. 

And at the same Anniversarie shalbe all the Doctors with the 
Gremialles as well Regents as Non-Regents with all other graduates 
and students in art then being in the said Vniversitie. 

And that yerely for euermore immediately before the beginning of 
the said obite or Anniversarie, after the scholars be assembled in the 
said Church, the statutes and ordinaunces provided and made for the 
trew observing and keeping of the articles in these present Indentiures 



Deed of Trust 267 

made and had shalbe read and openly declared in the middle lie of the 
said Churche afore the congregation there present, by one of the 
Proctors of the said Vniversitie, and he for to have for his labor Feeito 
twelve pence of lawfull money, and the other Proctor in like manner 
other twelve pence, and the three BedeUs eighteen pence, that is to say, 
for euery of them six pence^ and the bellringer for ringing to the 
Dirige and Masse four pence, and to the Master of Jhesus Colledge, or 
in his absence to his substitute, twelve pence, whereof the said Master 
or substitute shall offer at the Masse four pence, and for waxe six 
pence. All these somes aforesaid to be paid by the handes of the said 
Master, President, or substitute of the prenominate Jhesus Colledge, 
which somes in all do amount to the some of six shillings and eight 
pence. 

And that all the Gremialles and graduates, and all other scholars in AUnemiab, 
arte, being then in the said Vniversitie, shalbe openly warned by the and Sdiokn 
Bedells, after the custome of that said Vniversitie, to be at the said ^^^i 
Anniversarie for the more better remembraunce and continuaunce of 
the premises to be continued ; and that euery of the said Qremialles, 
graduates and scholars, yerely at euery of the said Anniversaries, shall 
sing or say for the sowle of the said Sir Robert Rede and other the 
sowles aforesaid. Placebo and Dirige with the Psalms, collects and 
orisons and other exequies thereto accustomed. 

And furthermore, the said Chauncellor [etc.], graunten and per- Ambtgoltiee 
mitten... that if any doubt or ambiguity hereafter be had or found in by the 
any article, clause, or word conteyned in this Indenture... that the said •^•^**'* 
article, clause or word... shalbe interpreted and made playn by the 
forenamed executors during their lives, or the overliver of either of 
them, according to their true meaning, and such interpretacion or 
exposicion as they do make to endure, and to be observed and kept, 
and so to continue for evermore. 

And whereas the said executors have caused to be made a table of The men- 
board with two leaves and with a chayne and a staple fastened to the caused oer- 
same table in the common schooles of the said Vniversitie, and have to be written 
caused to be written within the same table certaine ordinaunces and ^Stimd 
statutes in parchement for a remembrance of the covenaunts, graunts, t£Jf§£^|^ 
and premisses aforesaid to be trewly performed and kept after the tenor 
and forme of the same, the foresaid Chauncellor [etc.], graunten and 
permitten...that the said table with the said statutes and ordinaunces 
therein written shall perpetually there stand and remayue. And if the 
said table or the statutes within the same be hereafter taken away, that 
then the said Chauncellor [etc.] covenaunten and graunten... to cause 
to be made a new like table of board with two leaves, and cause the 
same table within two monethes next after the said other table is so 
taken away to be hanged with a chayne in the foresaid place of the 
said common schooles, after like manner as the first was, and in the 
said table cause to be written new againe aU the foresaid ordinaunces 



268 Lady SaMeirs Lecturers in Algebra 

and statutes in the said old table conteyned, and so as often as any of 
the said tables or statutes be taken away. 
Aatotateto And the said Chauncellor [etc.], graunten and pemiitten...that 
they shall well and truly observe and keep, and cause to be observed, 
performed and kept, aU the foresaid oovenaunts, premises and agree- 
ments on their part to be observed, performed and kept ; And for the 
further surety of the trew conservacion of the premises on their part to 
be observed and kept, they shall cause an Estatute and ordinaunce to 
be made in the said Vniversitie within three monethes next after the 
sealing of these Indentures, and by the same statute and ordinaunce to 
bynd them and their successors, students in arte, to fulfil and observe 
all the premises on their part to be observed and kept. 

In witnesse whereof to the one part of these present Indentures 
tripartite remayning with the said Chauncellor [etc.], the foresaid 
Seals i^ed executors have putto their seales, and the said Master and Fellowes 
parts. of the said CoUedge have also putto their common seals of the same 

Colledge ; and to the second part of these said Indentures, remayning 
with the forenamed executors, the foresaid Chancellor [etc.], have putto 
the common seale of the said Vniversitie, and the said Master and 
Fellowes of the said Colledge have also put their common seal of the said 
Colledge ; And to the third part of these present Indentures remaining 
with the said Master and Fellowes of the said Colledge, the foresaid 
Chancellor [etc.], have putto their common seal of the said Vniversitie, 
and the said executors have also putt their seals. 

Yeven the tenth day of December, in the yere of our Lord God a 
thowsand fyve hundred fowre and twenty, and in the yere of the reigne 
of oure Souera^ne Lorde Henry the eight... the sixten^. 



2. Benefaction of Lady Sadleib. 
1706. 

The Lady Sadleir, wife of Sir Edwin Sadleir of Temple 
Dinsley, Hertfordshire, by Will dated 25 September, 1701, 
made provision for the stipends of lecturers in Algebra in 
the different Colleges. Her first husband, William Croone, 
M.D., is said to have suggested this foundation". Lady 
Sadleir died 30 September, 1706 ; and the lectures began in 
Emmanuel College (to which preference was given in various 
ways because Dr Croone had been Fellow there) at Michael- 

1 Collated with the original deed (much damaged) in the Registry of the 
University {Charten, etc. No. 159) ; and with the transcript in Hare (paper 
oopy), Vol. iii. fol. 66. 

« Diet, of Nat. Biogr. Vol. xiii. p. 207. 



Sddlerian Professorship 269 

mas, 1710. Ultimately lecturers were appointed in all the 
colleges*. 

The intention of the foundress is thus stated in her Will*: 

The true intent and meaning of these Lectures are for the full and 
clear explication and teaching that part of Mathematical knowled^ 
commonlj called Algebra, or the method or rule of contemplating 
quantities in general, with particular application and use of it in 
Arithmetic and (Geometry, either according to the method of Des Cartes 
or any other of those who have best improved it since. 

The candidates for the lectureships were to be examined 
in the presence of two Heads of Colleges by "the public 
Professor of Mathematics," i.e. the Lucasian Professor, to 
whom the Plumian Professor was subsequently assigned as a 
colleague. The election was made by the Master and Fellows 
of the College, and the lecturer held office for ten years. 
The salary was £20 a year at least, except at Emmanuel 
College, where it was £30, but the exact amount was to 
depend on the state of the funds at the disposal of the 
trustees. 

In the Report of the Commissioners appointed 31 August, 
1850, attention was drawn to the unsatisfactory state of this 
endowment'; and when the Council of the Senate undertook 
the revision of the Statutes, they proposed (21 October, 1867) 
that the appointments of Lecturers should cease, and that 
"a new direction should be given to the Endowment by the 
establishment of a Professorship in the University to be 
called the Sadlerian Professorship of Pure Mathematics." 
This statute, having been approved by the Senate 26 No- 
vember, 1857, was adopted, with some alterations, by the 
Commissioners, and received the royal assent 7 March, 1860*. 

The endowment bequeathed by Lady Sadleir for the 
stipends of her lecturers was conveyed to the University by 
her trustees, 26 October, 1866*. 

* See Cooper's Annods, iv. 77. 

* Printed in EndawmenU, 1876, pp. 222—228; with the ** Orders" or 
Begulations agreed to hy the Trustees soon after their appointment in 1718, 
pp. 228—237. The Minnte Book of the Trustees is in the Registry of the 
Uniyersity. 

' Report, etc. p. 68. « Statutes, ed. 1882, p. 97 ; ed. 1896, p. 91. 

^ The indenture is printed in Endoumente, ed. 1876, p. 821. 



270 Benefaction of the Royal 

3. Benefaction of the Royal Geographical Society. 

1887. 

In 1886 the Royal Geographical Society sent the following 
letter* to the Vice-Chancellor : 

1, Savilb Bow, Burlington Qardens, W. 
9<A December^ 1886. 

Sir, 

The Council of the Boyal Qeographical Society have on two 
previous occasions (in 1871 and 1874} addressed memorials of which 
copies are enclosed, to your predecessors, urging the claims of geography 
to further recognition by the Universities. 

They have recently undertaken an inquiry into the position of 
geography in English and Continental education. The result has been 
unfavourable to England ; and there has been a general concurrence 
of testimony, according with their own strong conviction, that the most 
effectual step towards the removal of our inferiority would be the 
establishment in our Universities of Chairs or Beaderships similar to 
those held in Germany, viz. by Karl Bitter at Berlin, and Professors 
Peschel and Bichthofen at Leipzig. 

So much of human knowledge and himian interests is bound up 
with the relations and interaction of the physical conditions of the 
earth, the study of which is practically embraced in geography, that 
there are few branches of education which do not present a geo- 
graphical aspect, and which do not therefore offer a field for instruction 
in geography in combination with some other subject. 

It is unnecessary to insist upon the close connection of history and 
geography, or upon the importance of a knowledge of the physical 
conditions of the various regions of the world, to those who engage in 
the conduct of our political affairs. 

Without the comprehensive study of the earth, for which Englishmen, 
as a people, have the largest opportunities and the least preparation, 
physical students would fail to grasp the true character and relations 
of the various sciences of observation, such as anthropology, geology, 
botany, meteorology, Ac. 

It seems to us that the courses of a Header or Professor in Geography 
might easily, by consultation with the examiners, be so arranged as to 
fit in with the requirements of scholars in the Honour Schools, their 
establishment serving rather to complete the present University system 
of instruction than to introduce a new element into it. 

^ Biporter^ 11 Janoary, 1887, p. 880. The memorials mentioned in the 
first paragraph haire not been preserved. 



Oeographical Society 271 

The Council of the Royal Oeographical Society are so fully convinced 
of the national importance of placing geographical science on a sound 
fooling, and of the necessity of some action at the Universities in order 
to obtain this result, that they have approved the proposals submitted 
by their Education Committee, enclosed herewith, which they beg you 
to take into your favourable consideration, and to submit at the earliest 
opportunity to the proper authorities. 

The length of time for which the Society should undertake to make 
a contribution out of its funds towards a Oeographical Chair or Reader- 
ship will be further considered whenever your University may be 
prepared to accept our proposition in principle, and to discuss in detail 
the plans proposed. 

A similar proposal has already been laid before the Vice-Chancellor 
of Oxford and is now under the consideration of the Hebdomadal 
CoundL 

I am, Sir, [etc.] 

To the Vioe-Chancellar of the Richard Strachkt, 

Univernty of Cambridge, Vice-Presidenty R.G.S. 

The Council of the Senate, after consultation with the 
Society, were able to inform the Senate in a report* dated 
14 March, 1887, that the Society would contribute £150 
annually for five years towards the stipend of a lecturer, 
and, further, would award, in alternate years, an Exhibition, 
value £100, or two prizes of £50 and £25, the balance being 
reserved to provide a fee for the adjudicator. 

It was further proposed that the lecturer be appointed 
by a Committee consisting of representatives of the Council 
of the Society and an equal number of representatives of the 
Council of the Senate; and that there should be also a 
Committee of Management consisting of an equal number of 
Members of the Senate and of the Society. This report 
having been confirmed by the Senate 9 June, 1887*; and a 
preliminary course of lectures having been delivered by 
Lieut.-Gen. R. Strachey, F.R.S., in the Lent Term, 1888, the 
first lecturer was appointed 14 June, 1888. 

When the first five years were about to expire the Society 
renewed their proposal for a second term of five years ; new 
regulations for the lecturer were proposed by the Council 



> Reporter, 15 March, p. 516. 
* Ibid. 14 Jane, p. 869. 



272 Benefaction of Mr Montefiore 

of the Senate 6 March, 1893^ and accepted by the Senate 
27 Aprir. 

In 1897 (3 May) the Vice-Chancellor informed the 
University that he had received a cheque for £60 from 
Dr Frithjof Nansen, as a contribution towards the teaching 
of Geography in the University*. 

In 1897 (20 March) the President of the Royal Geo- 
graphical Society informed the Vice-Chancellor that having 
regard to other demands upon the finances of the Society, it 
would not be possible to continue the grant after the 
expiration of the second period of five years. The General 
Board of Studies, after consideration of the whole question, 
and conference with the Society, were able to inform the 
Senate in a report dated 9 February, 1898*, that the contri- 
bution would be continued for another five years, if the 
Lectureship were converted into a Readership. This report 
was confirmed by the Senate 10 March, 1898*. 



4. Benefaction of Mr C. G. Montefiore. 
1891. 

In 1890 the General Board of Studies appointed Mr 
Solomon Schechter to be University Lecturer in Talmudic 
for a term of five years commencing from Michaelmas 1890. 
In 1891 the following letter was received by the Vice- 
Chancellor : 

CoLDEABT, Southampton, 
Nov. 15, 1881. 
Deab Sir, 

I have been, as you may be aware, in coirespondence with 
Prof. Robertson Smith, in respect to a suggestion to convert Mr 
Schechter's Lectureship in Rahbinic into a Readership. To that end 
I should be willing to give an annual sum of £250, to continue so long 
as Mr Schechter held the office and then to lapse. 

1 ReporUr, 7 March, p. 696. • Ibid. 2 May, p. 788. 

' Ibid. 4 May, p. 854. 

« Ibid. 15 February, p. 479. The report there printed contains the 
letter of the President of the Royal Geographical Society referred to above, 
s Ibid. 15 March, p. 612. Ordinances, ed. 1901, p. 488. 



Reader in Tcdmtulie 273 

If the Senate approved of this suggestion, I could have a legal 
document drawn up to the above effect, and I would also make testa- 
mentary provision that the £250 a year should still be paid if I die 
while Mr Schechter is still in office. 

Perhaps you will be kind enough to bring the matter before the 
Senate. 

I am, [etc.] 

CLAUDE G. MONTEFIORE. 

After consideration of this letter, the General Board of 
Studies, in a report dated 28 November, 1891, made the 
following recommendation : 

That a Readership in Talmudic be established, in place of the 
present University Lectureship ; and that the Header's annual stipend 
be £350, provided that £250 per annum be furnished for this purpose 
by private donation or bequests 

This report having been confirmed by Grace, 17 December, 
1891*, a deed (A) was drawn up between the University and 
Mr Montefiore, by which the annual sum specified was 
secured to the University ; and subsequently, on the election 
of Mr Abrahams as Reader in the place of Dr Schechter 
resigned (17 March, 1902), a second deed (B) secured the 
same sum during his tenure of oflBce*. 

A. Deed to secure annual payment of £250, 
10 February, 1892. 

This Indenture made the tenth day of February One thousand 
eight hundred and ninety two Between Claude Joseph Goldsmid- 
Montefiore of No 12 Portman Square in the ooimty of Middlesex Esquire 
of the one part and The Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the 
University of Cambridge of the other part. 

Whereas the Qeneral Board of Studies of Cambridge University 
have recommended to the Senate that a Readership in Talmudic be 
established in place of the present University Lectureship, and that the 
Reader's annual stipend be Three hundred and fifty pounds provided 
that Two hundred and fifty poimds per annum be furnished for this 
purpose by private donation or bequest ; 

And whereas the said recommendation of the General Board of 
Studies has been duly confirmed by a Grace of the Senate passed on 

1 Reporter, 1 December, 1891, p. 240. * Ibid. 23 Deoember, p. 837. 

* Ibid. 22 Apiil, 1902, p. 718. 

C. 18 



274 Reader in Talmudic 

the seventeenth day of December One thousand eight hundred and 
ninety one ; 

And whereas the Lectureship in Talmudic in the said University 
is at present or was at the date of the said Grace being passed held by 
Solomon Schechter, and the said Claude Joseph Gk)ldsmid-Montefiore 
with the object of assisting in foimding the said proposed Readership 
has agreed with the said Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the 
University of Cambridge to pay to them so long as the said Solomon 
Schechter shall live and shall hold the post of Reader the annual sum 
of Two himdred and fifty pounds ; 

Now this Indenture witnesaeth that in pursuance of the said agree- 
ment and for the consideration aforesaid the said Claude Joseph 
Goldsmid-Moutefiore hereby covenants for himself his heirs executors 
and administrators with the said Chancellor Masters and Scholars of 
the University of Cambridge to pay to the said Chancellor Masters and 
Scholars of the University of Cambridge so long as the said Solomon 
Schechter shall live and shall hold and enjoy the post of Reader in 
Talmudic in the said University the yearly sum of Two hundred and 
fifty pounds, to commence and be payable as and from the first day of 
January One thousand eight hundred and ninety two and to be paid 
yearly on the first day of January in every year the first of such yearly 
payments to be made on the first day of January One thousand eight 
hundred and ninety two. 

In witness whereof the said parties to these presents have hereunto 
set their hands and seals the day and year first above written \ 



B. Second deed to secure continxiance of payments notwith- 
standing change of Reader 3 June, 1902. 

This Indenture made the third day of June One thousand nine 
hundred and two between Claude Joseph Qoldsmid-Montefiore of 
12 Portman Square in the County of London Esquire of the one part 
and The Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge 
of the other part. 

Whereas on the eighteenth day of April One thousand nine hundred 
and two the within named Solomon Schechter resigned the Office of 
Reader in Talmudic in the said University ; 

And whereas the within named General Board of Studies of the said 
University has appointed Israel Abrahams of 77 Elgin Avenue London 
W. Esquire to be Reader in place of the said Solomon Schechter and 
such appointment has been duly confirmed by the Special Board for 
Oriental Studies in accordance with Statute B (of the said University) 
Chapter vii Section 4 ; 

> Regiatiy, Vol. oxiii. 26». 



Sandars Reader in Bibliography 275 

And whereas the said Claude Joseph Goldsmid-Montefiore has agreed 
with the said Ghanoellor Masters and Scholars of the said Universitj 
to continue to pay to them the within mentioned annual sum of Two 
hundred and fifty pounds so long as the said Israel Abrahams shall live 
and shall hold the post of Reader ; 

Now this Indent\ire witnesseth that in order to carry into efiect 
the said Agreement and in consideration of the premises the within 
written Indenture shall be construed and take effect henceforward in 
all respects as if the name of the said Israel Abrahams had been 
originally inserted therein in place of that of the said Solomon 
Schechter. 

In witness whereof the said parties to these presents have hereunto 
set their hands and seals the day and year first above written ^. 



5. Benefaction of Samuel Sandaes, M.A. 
1894. 

In July, 1894, the Vice-Chancellor was informed that 
Samuel Sandars, M.A., of Trinity College, who died 15 June 
1894, had bequeathed to the University £2000 free of legacy 
duty, for the endowment of a Reader in Bibliography. The 
following is the portion of the codicil of his Will which deals 
with this bequest : 

I bequeath to the University of Cambridge in its corporate capacity 
the sum of £2,000 free of duty. 

And I direct that this sum be invested and that the Income arising 
therefrom be paid to a Reader in Bibliography such Reader to be 
elected in the first instance and on each vacancy by the Vice-Chancellor 
the Master of Trinity College Cambridge when not holding the office of 
Vice-Chancellor and the other persons for the time being composing 
the Syndicate of the University Library and such Reader may be 
api)ointed for such a period as the elective body shall think fit and 
specify and shall be subject to removal by such elective body at their 
discretion. 

And I declare that the duty of such Reader shall be to deliver one 
or more lectures annually or if the elective body shall so determine 
biennially in some suitable place and on a day and hour to be deter- 
mined by the Vice-Chancellor for the time being that the lecture shall 
be delivered during Term and shall embrace the subjects of Bibliography 
Palaeography Typography Bookbinding Book Illustration the science of 
Books and Manuscripts and the Arts relating thereto. 

^ Registry, ut wwgra, 

18—2 



276 English Lectureship 

It is mj wish subject to the discretion of the elective bodj for the 
time being that the lectures be based on and be illustrated by examples 
contained in the University Library or the College Libraries at 
Cambridge. 

And I direct that it be a condition of the tenure of the office of 
Reader that the Reader deliver a written or printed copy of each lecture 
to the University Library and also to the British Museum Library. 

And I declare that in all matters relating to the administration 
of this Bequest which may have to be determined by the elective body 
the votes of a majority shall be sufficient to determine the same K 

The Council of the Senate, in their report* (29 October, 
1894) recommending that this bequest be accepted, drew 
attention to the fact that "the Reader in Bibliography would 
not have the same duties or the same status as a Reader 
appointed under Statute B, Chapter VII, but [that] no 
confusion would arise if it were arranged that his official 
title should be the Bandars Reader in Bibliography" 

This report was confirmed by the Senate, 22 November, 
1894». 



6. The English Lectureship Fund. 
1896. 

In 1895 (2 November) the Rev. W. W. Skeat, Professor 
of Anglo-Saxon, informed the Vice-Chancellor that he had 
"been for some time engaged in collecting money for the 
purpose of providing a University Lecturer in English 
Literature*"; and the General Board of Studies, in a Report 
dated 4 December, 1895*, were able to state that he had 
"received the promise of contributions amounting to £1220," 
that he desired "to hand over that sum at once to the 
University, and, at a future time, further sums which he 
expects to receive for the same purpose." 

The Board recommended that this generous offer should 
be accepted with thanks, and that a University Lectureship 

1 Registry, Vol. xxxi. 7. 96\ • Reporter, 6 November, 1894, p. 169. 

s Ibid. 27 November, p. 261. « Bc^stry, Vol. oxiii. 81. 

^ Reporter, 10 December, 1896, p. 286. 



Gilbey Lecturer in AgrieuUure 277 

in English should be established. This report was confirmed 
by Grace 30 January, 1896^ 

A statement published by the Treasurer of the Fund 
23 January, 1902, shewed that the amount received up to 
that date was £2150*. 



7. Benefaction of Sir Walter Gilbey. 

1896. 

The following letter, written to the Vice-Chancellor by 
Sir Walter Gilbey, President of the Royal Agricultural 
Society, was published by the Council of the Senate, in a 
report dated 1 June, 1896*. 

Cambridge House, 
Rsoent's Park, London, N.W. 
May 22, 1896. 
Dear Mr Vicb-Chanckllor, 

I have been much impressed by the little knowledge which 
appears to exist at present as to the agricultural methods and practices 
of the past, and as to the ways in which our ancestors faced the 
problems and difficulties which they, like us, had to face. 

It appears to me that it might be an advantage if the landowners 
of the futm^ during their most receptive period of existence, could 
learn something whilst at the University of the agricultural history 
and literature of the past ; and should the Senate of the University 
of Cambridge be disposed to entertain the idea, I should be glad to be 
permitted to provide funds for the founding of a Lectureship in this — 
to my mind — important subject. 

If therefore the Senate should favourably consider the matter, 
I should be happy to place in the hands of Trustees a sufficient sum 
to give an honorarium of say £25 per annum for a period of twenty ^ 
years to a Lecturer on Agricultural History and Economics ; and the 
only condition I would desire to suggest is that the President for the 
time being of the Royal Agricultural Society, an office which I have 
the honour to hold at the present moment, should have a voice in the 
appointment of the Lecturer. 

Yours very truly, 

WALTER GILBEY. 

1 Reporter, 4 February, 1896, p. 463. 

• Ibid. 28 January, 1902, p. 477. » Ibid. 2 June, 1896, p. 843. 

* Sir Walter subsequently extended the period of his benefaction to 
21 years. 



278 Lectureship in Hatisa 

This generous offer, with the regulations proposed by the 
Council of the Senate in the above report, was accepted by 
Grace 18 June, 1896 ^ The Vice-Chancellor announced 
14 December, that the necessary fiinds had been placed in 
trust by Sir Walter Qilbey». 



8. Benefaction of the Hausa Assocution. 
1896. 

This Lectureship was. founded by the Hausa Association 
in 1896 under the circumstances explained in the following 
letter : 

Emmanuel Colleoe, 0AMBBn)OE. 
May 16, 1896. 

DsAB Mr Vicb-Chancellor, 

I write on behalf of the Executive Committee of the Hausa 
ABSociation to ofifer to the University £100 per annum for the next 
three years, for the endowment of a Lectureship in the Hausa 
language. 

The philological interest of the language was recognized many years 
ago by the University of Oxford when they granted Dr Schou an 
Honorary Degree in acknowledgment of the value of his work in 
producing the earliest dictionary of the language. And we are grateful 
to add that it has within the last twelve months been sufficient to 
induce the Cambridge University. Press to imdertake the publication 
of the store of native Hausa MSS, which our Student Mr C. H. 
Robinson brought back from his recent visit to Kano. 

The language possesses at the same time still greater practical 
importance. Hausa ranks by the side of Arabic and Suaheli as one 
of the three most important languages for the development of Africa, 
and especially that part. of it which lies within the British sphere of 
influence on the West Coast. 

And the recent institution of an Examination for Student Inter- 
preterships in Hausa by the Civil Service Commissioners makes it 
important that there should be some recognized centre of instruction in 
England to which intending students can be directed. 

^ Beporter, 20 June, 1896, p. 1061. The Begulations are printed in 
Ordinaneei, ed. 1901, p. 444. 
' Ibid. 15 December, p. 843. 



Lectureship in Rvssian 279 

The Hausa Association therefore b^ leave to offer to the UniverBity 
the sum of £100 per annum, in the first instance for the next three 
years, for the endowment of a Lectureship in the Hausa language on 
such conditions as to appointment and residence as may be hereafter 

determined. 

I remain, [etc.] 

J. O. F. MURRAY, 
Hon, See. of the Hatua Auodation. 

The Council of the Senate recommended the acceptance 
of this offer in a report dated 15 June, 1 896 S which embodied 
the above letter, and regulations for the appointment of the 
Lecturer by a Committee of Selection and for his duties. 
This report was confirmed by Grace 18 June, 1896". 

At the end of the three years specified in the above 
report the Hausa Lectureship Committee recommended in a 
report dated 1 December, 1899', that the Lectureship be 
continued for a further period of three years, the Hausa 
Association contributing the necessary funds. This report 
was confirmed by Grace 14 December, 1899*. 

The Lecturer, C. H. Robinson, M.A., of Trinity College, 
was re-appointed for three years firom 1 January, 1900, by 
Grace 15 February, 1900». 



9. Benefaction of Sir D. L. Salomons. 
1899. 

In 1899 (3 May) the General Board of Studies informed 
the Senate that Sir David Lionel Salomons, Bart., of Gonville 
and Caius College (B.A. 1874, M.A. 1877), had offered to 
provide a stipend of £50 a year for five years for a University 
Lecturer in Russian*. 

1 Reporter, 16 June, p. 1002. 

' Ibid. p. 1061. The Begnlations are printed in Ordinances, ed. 1901, 
p. 443. 

' Ibid. 1 December, 1899, p. 266. This report gives an interesting 
aoooant of the work done by the Lecturer. 

* Ibid. 22 December, p. 345. <» Ibid. 20 Febniary, p. 532. 

' Ibid. 9 May, 1899, p. 835. The above report was confirmed by Graoe 
25 May ; bat subsequently (18 January, 1900) this Grace was rescinded and 
the office was designated Salomons' Lectureship in Bussian. Ordinances, 
ed. 1901, p. 446. 



280 Sidgurick Lecturer in Moral Science 

10. SiDGWicK Lectureship in Moral Science. 
1901. 

After the death of Professor Henry Sidgwick, 28 August, 
1900, some of his friends and colleagues requested the Vice- 
Chancellor to call a meeting " to consider what steps should 
be taken to perpetuate at Cambridge the memory of the 
services rendered by him to the University." This meeting 
was held at Trinity College Lodge 26 November, 1900*; 
and in rather less than a year (22 October, 1901) the 
executive Committee were able to send the following 
resolution to the Vice-Chancellor : 

That the sum of £2450 subscribed for a Memorial to perpetuate in 
Cambridge the memory of the late Professor Henry Sidgwick, together 
with any further sums that may hereafter be contributed for the 
purpose of increasing the Fimd, be ofifered to the Chancellor Masters 
and Scholars of the University in trust for the establishment and 
maintenance of a University Lectureship or other teaching office in 
Moral Science to be connected with the name of Professor Sidgwick'. 

This ofifer was accepted by the following Grace 7 November, 
1901: 

That the offer received from the Executive Conunittee of the 
Subscribers to a Fund for providing a Memorial to perpetuate in 
Cambridge the memory of the late Professor Henry Sidgwick be 
accepted, and that the Vice-Chancellor be authorised to convey to 
the Subscribers the thanks of the University for their generous 
benefaction^ 

The General Board of Studies, in a report dated 
20 November, 1901*, proposed the regulations now in force, 
which were accepted by the Senate 12 December, 1901*. 

^ The proceedings at this meeting are recorded in a special number of 
the Reporter, 7 December, 1900. 

« Rq[>orter, 29 October, 1901, p. 114. 

* Ibid. 12 November, p. 207. * Ibid. 26 November, p. 241. 

' Ibid. 23 December, p. 371. The regulations are printed in the 
Ordinances, ed. 1901, p. 715. 



VI. 
SCHOLARSHIPS 



Craven Scholarships 283 



1. Craven Scholarships, Studentship, and Fund. 

1649. 

1. The Scholarships. 

John Craven, created Baron Craven of Ryton in Shrop- 
shire, 21 March, 1642-43, by Will dated 28 May, 1647 (A), 
founded and endowed four Scholarships, two at Oxford and 
two at Cambridge. The Scholars were each to receive an 
annual stipend of £25 for fourteen years out of the rents 
of an estate at Canceme near Chichester, and the residue 
was to be employed in the redemption of English captives 
at Algiers or any other place under the dominion of the 
Turk. At Cambridge the first Scholars were elected 16 May, 
1649. 

The founder died in 1649, while his elder brother and 
heir, William Craven, afterwards created Earl Craven, was 
abroad. He, however, as he tells us in the deed of trust 
printed below, accepted the provisions of his brother's Will, 
and paid the Scholars through his agents, until his estates 
were confiscated by the Parliament, when the payments of 
necessity fell into arrear. After the Restoration, by deed 
dated 5 July, 1664 (B) he conveyed the land at Canceme 
to trustees "for the better performance of the charitable 
uses" directed by his brother's Will, and for the payment 
of the arrears due^ 

Baron Craven's Will does not prescribe the mode of 
election of the Scholars, or the subjects in which they are 
to excel ; in fact his principal object seems to have been to 

^ Diet, of Nat. Biogr. Vol. ziii. p. 45. For the sequestration of the 
Graven estates see Stutex Archaol, Coll.^ ziz. p. 110. 



284 Cromea Scholarships 

provide pecuniary help for poor students who deserved it, 
and for his own kinsfolk. 

Regulations for the election of the Oxford Scholars (C) 
were made by William Craven soon after his brother's death, 
and accepted by Convocation 26 October, 1649. 

In 1681 the Cambridge electors addressed a memorandum 
to Earl Craven, stating that, in their judgment, constant 
residence should be required from the Scholars, and 'EatI 
Craven fully concurred with them (D); but it was not till 
1701 that steps were taken to provide Cambridge with a 
body of rules similar in character to those drawn for Oxford 
fifty-two years previously. In 1701, however, a Syndicate 
was appointed by the following Grace, which passed the 
Senate 27 November: 

Cum Scholares duos liberal! admodum exhibitione sustentari cura- 
verit IlluBtrissimus Comes de Craven, in iis autem eligendis nullam 
omnino assignaverit methodum ; Placeat vobis ut Dignissimus Domi- 
nus ProcancellariuB, Professores Regii, et Orator Publious per ultimam 
presdicti Comitis voluntatem Electores hac in parte nominati, una 
cum reverendis viriB Domino Gulielmo Dawes, et Doctore Carolo 
Roderick^, legitimis hujuace donationis Fiduciariis, Syndici yestri 
constituantur ; utque Academiaa nomine ipsis, aut ipsorum ad minus 
quinque (quorum unus sit Dominus Procancellarius) regularum, qu» 
in posteris electionibus rata sint, figendarum potestas plena conce- 
datur*. 

The rules which they drew up (E) dated 8 December, 1701, 
determined the lines on which the Scholarships should be in 
future assigned, and remained in force until 1861. In 1724 
a curious point arose. At an election held 26 October in that 
year it happened that there were two candidates, William 
Battie of King's College, and Richard Bentley of Trinity 
College, a nephew of the Master, and that the votes of the 
electors were equally divided between them — one elector, 
the Professor of Greek, being absent. Further, a second 
scrutiny being held, four days later (30 October), Bentley's 
supporters absented themselves. The case of an equality 
of votes not having been provided for in the rules, the 

1 Provost of King's OoUege, 1689-1712. 
> Grace Book 6, p. 478. 



Craven Scholarships 285 

three electors who had voted for Battle (one of whom was 
the Vice -Chancellor) drew up a statement of what had 
occurred (F) which was read to the Senate by the Senior 
Proctor at the next Congregation, which happened to be 
held on the day succeeding the second meeting of the 
electors. The statement having been read the following 
Grace was carried by 54 votes to 21 : 

Cum RegulsB jampridem a Syndicis yestris constitutss de Forma 
Eleciionis duorum Scholarimn ex fundatione Honoratissimi Domini 
Craven, Baronis de Ryton, incertum reliquerint ejusmodi electionis 
exitum si forte eligentium sufiragia in sequales partes fuerint divisa, 
quod in electione jam pendente accidisse compertum est: Plaoeat 
Vobis, ne lis indirempta maneat, ut, quoad pnesentem banc electionem 
ille e candidatis parem suffragantium numerum habentibus pro electo 
habeatur, quem Honoratissimus Dominus de Craven, utpote summus 
et prsBcipuus in illustri Fundatoris Familia, anteferendum duxerit ; in 
futuris autem electionibus, si eadem qu» nunc sufiragiorum paritas 
oontigerit, ea pars pravaleat a qua steterit Dominus Procancellarius^ 

This vote introduced the custom of giving to the Vice- 
Chancellor a second voice in equally balanced cases, which 
has since been adopted with relation to other prizes in the 
University. 

In 1819 the Court of Chancery decreed that the number 
of Scholarships should be increased to ten, with an annual 
income of £50 (G); in 1841 that the income should be 
raised to £75 (H); and in 1860 that the number of 
Scholarships should be twelve and the income £80 (I). 

A new statute was proposed by the Council of the 
Senate 23 November, 1857, for the Craven, Battie, Davies, 
and Pitt Scholarships in common. This was accepted by 
the Senate 8 December, 1857, and having been adopted, 
with some alterations, by the Commissioners, received the 
royal assent 16 April, 1861*. 

^ Grace Book I, p. 121. Earl Graven decided in favour of William 
Battie. See an account of the incident in Monk*s Lift of Bentley, Vol. ii. 
pp. 213—216. 

> Statutei, ed. 1896, p. 101. The rules for the Graven, Battie, Davies, 
and Pitt Scholarships in common are printed in Ordinances, ed. 1901, p. 540. 



286 



Craven StvdentsMp and Fund 



2. The Stvdentship and Fund. 

In 1886 the Council of the Senate informed the University 
that the trustees of the foundation of Lord Craven had 
informed them that the fund shewed a surplus of £590 
a year, of which it was presumed that one-half would be 
assigned to Cambridge. In their report^ dated 8 June, 
1886, they suggested, with regard to this money, that a sum 
of £200 a year should be devoted to the endowment of a 
Studentship for the purpose of facilitating advanced study 
or research away from Cambridge in the Languages, Literature, 
History, Archaeology, or Art of ancient Greece or Rome, or 
the Comparative Philology of the Indo-European languages ; 
and that the remainder of the fund might advantageously 
be devoted to the furtherance of research in the Languages, 
Literature, History, Archaeology, and Art of ancient Greece 
and Rome, and the Comparative Philology of the Indo- 
European languages. This report was confirmed by Grace 
18 June, 1885. 

In 1886 (8 July) an Order was made in the High Court 
of Justice (Chancery Division) for the distribution of Lord 
Craven's benefaction*. 



lAndflat 
Oanaerne 
In SoflBex. 



Out of 
the rents 
4 8cholan 
are to be 
maintained, 
9 at Oxford, 
2 at Cam- 
Inridge. 
How the 
■cholarB 
are to be 



A. Extract from the Will of John Baron Craven, 
dated 28 May, 1647. 

...Item I give and bequeath to my Executor all my landes and 
hereditamentes in Canseme in the Countie of Sussex... to this intent 
and purpose. 

That out of the yearelie proffittes of the saide landes Tenementes 
and hereditamentes One hundred poundes a yeare bee raised towardee 
the mayntenance of fower poore Schollers, whereof two to bee in the 
Vniversitie of Oxford and two in the Vniversitie of Cambridge. 

The Schollers who are to have the benefitt of this majntenance in 
Oxford shall be chosen by the Vioe-Chancellor, the Kinges Professors 
and the Orator there for the tyme beinge or the greater parte of them. 

> Reporter, 9 June, 1885, p. 804. The regulations for the Studentship 
and the Fund are printed in Ordinances, ed. 1901, p. 470. 

' ReporUr, 5 October, 1886, p. 2. The regulations forming part of the 
Scheme are printed in OrdinanceM, ed. 1901, p. 478 ; and the Scheme in 
the Appendix to this volume. 



Deed of Trust 287 

And soe likewise in Cambridge bj the Vice Chancellor the Einges 
Professors and the Orator there for the tyme beinge or the greater 
parte of them. 

Yet mj will is, That if anie of mj name or kindred shall happen to Fonndo's 
bee poore, and to bee a SchoUer in either Vniversitie, hee shall bee thepn- 
preferred to have the bonefitt of this majnetenance before any other •"'"*• 
Scholler whatsoever ; 

And my will is That the said Annuitie and maynetenanoe shall ^<^^2!!£Si^ 
cease and determyne to anie such Scholler after hee hath beene in the at end of 14 
Vniversitie by the space of fowerteene yeares. And likewise it shall {heM^i^ 
cease and determyne to anie such SchoUers that shall attayne to anie S^fSf ^' 
preferrment of a double value ; and then the said Annuitie soe deter- Jj^* 
myninge shall bee bestowed upon some other poore Scholler. 

And for the rest and residue of the yearelie revenue of my said land tim reridne 
My will is, That it bee ymployed and bestowed for and towardes the on the ra- 
redempcion of English Christian Captives prisoners in Algiers or in of EndSSi 
anie other places under the Dominion of the Turka The disposall of 2Jwi* 
this money shall bee by the discretion and appointment of the Lord ^JwkZ 
Major and the Recorder of the Cittie of London and the Maister of 
Suttons Hospitall for the tyme beinge or the greater parte of them^. 



B. Deed of trusty dated 5 July, 1664. 

This Indenture made the 6th day of July in the 16th year of the 5 July, 1664. 
reign of... Charles the Second... 1664. 

Between the Right Honourable William Lord Craven, Baron of 
Hampsted, Marshall in the County of Berks, of the one part And 
Sir John Baber of Covent Garden in the County of Middlesex, Knight, 
Richard Allestry of the University of Oxford D.D., John Fell, D.D., 
Dean of the Cathedral Church of Christ in Oxford And John Dolben, 
D.D., Dean of the Collegiate Church of St Peter in Westminster of the 
other part : 

Whereas the Right Honourable John Lord Craven deoeased being John Lord 
seized in his demesne of fee simple of and in the Capital Messuage certain 
Manor or Lordship of Canseme in the county of Sussex, And of several smn ud 
Messuages [etc.] all lying and being in the parishes of East Qrinsted ^^^^ 
and Hartfield in the said County of Sussex and parish of Cowden in the 
Coimty of Kent 

And the said John Lord Craven being of the premises so seized did Which he 
make his last Will and Testament in writing bearing date the twenty ^VilUes 
eighth day of May... 1647... and thereby did amongst other gifts and mH^^Imt. 
legacies give and bequeath in these words following : 

[Here followa the extract from his Will as above,] 
1 From the Registry of Wills, Somerset House, London. 



288 



Craven. ScTwlarships 



Bichard 
Spencer, 
who was 
made ex- 
ecutor, re- 
Dounoed, 
and ad- 
ministration 
of the estate 
devolred 
onWilUam 
Lord 

GraTen,hi8 
brother. 
He con- 
firmed the 
charitable 
bequests. 
Thouffh he 
wasaoroad 
he paid the 
scholars 
untU the 
usurping 
goTemment 
took posses- 
sion of his 
estate, and 
did not 
thescht 



toiarB. 



As soon as 
he could 
return to 
England he 
was willing 
to have the 
charitable 
bequests 
cairied out. 
He has sold 
his Manor 
of Ganseme 
to Sir John 
Baberand 
others. 



Itissgreed 
that the 



tioned in 
thelVill are 
aUtobe 
performed. 



Each scholar 

shall duly 

receirejCSS 

per annum 

bjhalf 

yearly 

payments. 



And the said John Lord Craven did appoint Richard Spencer Esqr. 
Executor of his said last Will... ; And whereas the said Richard Spencer 
renounced the said Executorship and the administration of the estate 
of the said John Lord Craven with the Will annexed being granted to 
the said William Lord Craven being his brother and next heir 

And the said William Lord Craven although he had just cause to 
teike exception to the said Will yet he was content and ready to 
confirm the said charitable uses appointed out of the said Manor and 
Farm of Canseme and other the premises; and although he were in 
parts beyond the seas at the time of the making of the said Will yet 
by his officers in England he did pay the scholars appointed in both 
the said Universities according to the intention of the said last Will 
untill the latd usurping power did possess the whole estate of the said 
William Lord Craven and by colour of a commission of their own 
making by which they did appoint Commissioners of their own 
choosing who by colour of the said Commission did enter upon the 
said Manor and Farm of Canseme... and did dispose thereof to such 
hands that did determine the rents and profits thereof, and did not pay 
the said scholars by which means they came much in arrear 

And the said William Lord Craven returning into England as soon 
as possible he might he did regain the possession of the said Manor 
and premises and hath been ready and willing to have the said 
charitable uses performed 

And whereas the said William Lord Craven for the better per- 
formance of the said charitable uses by the assent of both the said 
Universities by his deed of bargain and sale bearing date with these 
presents and enrolled in the High Court of Chancery... hath bargained 
and sold the said Manor of Canseme... unto the said Sir John Baber 
[and others as above] 

Now this Indenture further witnesseth, and it is hereby declared by 
all and every the parties to these presents that they the said Sir John 
Baber [and others as above] shall and will for ever hereafter receive and 
take the Rents Issues and profits of the premises and undertake and 
perform the trust of the execution of the said charitable uses in the 
said Will mentioned... and shall and will from time to time free and 
discharge the said William Lord Craven... from the charge burthen and 
trouble of the said trust... 

And it is further agreed... that the scholars that are from time to 
time hereafter nominated by the said William Lord Craven during his 
life time and after his death that are duly elected in either of the said 
Universities or hereafter shall be duly elected according to the inten- 
tion of the said last Will shall have their respective stipends of five and 
twenty pounds per annum duly paid by half yearly payments, That is 
to say £12. 10. 0. at the end of every six months as the rents of the 
said Manor and premises can be got and the said scholars in the first 
place to be satisfied and paid the said pensions or salaries 



Rvles for election of Oxford Scholars 289 

And whereas by reason that the said Manor and premises in the ^^^^^^^^^ 

times of the late Wars were forced out of the possession of the said paid. 

William Lord Craven there are several arrears of the said stipends 

due and impaid to some of the scholars now in place and to others 

that have left their places As namely to John Whitmore who was 

duly elected into one of the said scholars places in the said University 

of Cambridge five years sythence and for all that time hath not received 

one penny towards his maintenance by reason that Robert Sawyer 

that was his predecessor was then in arrear five years and a half and 

was first to be paid by agreement when he surrendered his possession 

they being both of near kindred to the said John Lord Craven It 

is therefore further agreed... that the said John Whitmore shall have 

all his arrears paid as soon as there will be a surplus arise out of the 

rents and profits of the said Manor and premises over and above the 

said yearly payment of £100 per annum and to be paid to the said 

Scholars and thirty pounds per annum for the payment of a rent 

charge whereunto the premises are liable 

And that other scholars arrears shall likewise be paid in their turn The money 

for the re- 
as the rents and profits of the premises shall be sufficient before any of demption of 

the said rents and profits shall be applied to redeem Captives for that S m paid 

the said Will doth appoint that the said scholars shall be paid in the KhoiMs 

first place •"■^- 



And it is further agreed by and between all and every the parties AU doca- 
to these presents that all deeds writings and evidences which do con- lodmd in 
cem the tythe of the said Manor and premises... shall be put into a (^^j^^ 
chest or trunk with three locks which trunk or chest shall be lodged in 
the Chapel of the Rolls with a superscription wrote upon parchment 
and fixed upon the top thereof to which trunk or chest there shall be 
three keys one to be kept by the said Sir John Baber another by the 
said John Fell and the third by the said John Dolben 

And at such time as any one of the said Trustees shall die then the Wbtt is to 
three surviving Trustees shall nominate three others and shall convey the death of 
the said Manor and premises in such manner that all six may have a 
joint interest in [them] and be liable to perform the said trust... 

In witness whereof the parties to these presents interchangeably 
have hereunto set their hands and seals the day and year first above 
written ^ 

C. Regulations for the election of the Oaford Scholars, 
approved 26 October, 1649. 

1. That when any place shall be void, the Vice Chancellor, the 
King's Professors, and the Orator for the time present shall within 
three days notice thereof cause an intimation to be set upon the door 

» From a copy in the Begistry of the University, Vol. xxxviii. 22. 6. 
C. 19 



290 Craven Scholarships 

of the Public Library of an election to be made on the 10th day 
following, if it be term time, or, if it be vacation, the 10th day after 
the beginning of the next term, in the Grammar School. 

2. That at the time of the election the Vice Chancellor and all the 
rest of the Electors then present in the University meet together and 
give no promise or consent to any to be elected before they so meet 
together, and all or a major part agree to the Scholar to be elected. 

3. That in the first place respect be had to those who are of the 
Lord Craven's kindred or nama 

4. That in defect of such that Scholar be preferred who upon good 
certificate of his manners and due examination of his learning shall be 
found most worthy. 

5. That none be chosen who is a Graduate in the University or 
Fellow or Scholar of any College, or whose parents are well known to 
be of ability to maintain him otherwise, except he be of the kindred or 
name of the Lord Craven ^ 



D. Memorandum of the Electors on residence of the 
Scholars, 2 August, 1681; with Earl Graven*s answer. 

Memorandum. That the Vice-Chancellour and other Electors being 
met at the time and place and for the purpose above specified' takeing 
notice that the late Exhibitioner, John Atkinson, had discontinued 
from the University almost the whole time of his enjoying the said 
Exhibition, contrary to the designe and wiU of the Benefactor, did 
thereupon require a promise from the Scholar recommended to them 
by my Lord Craven to keep constant residence in the University 
during the whole time of his enjoying the benefit of the exhibition, 
and never to goe out of it without leave first asked and obtained from 
the Vice-Chancellour for the time being; which thing he promised 
duly to observe. 

At the same time alsoe It was agreed by the persons above-men- 
tioned, that a letter, to be drawn up by the Vice-Chancellour, should 
be sent to the Right Honourable the Lord Craven, signifying those 
their proceedings, which was accordingly done; and an answer troia 

^ From a copy in the handwriting of the Bev. Jos. Bomilly, Begistrary. 
Begistry, Vol. xxxviii. 22. 8. 

* A meeting of the electors held 2 August, 1B81, when Robert Topban 
(Pem.) was elected into the scholarship held by John Atkinson (Trin.) since 
5 June, 1667. An official aocoant of the proceedings at this meeting, 
attested by Matth. Whinn, Begistrary and Notaiy Public, is in the volame 
(preserved in the Registry) lettered "University Scholarships," p. 38. 
After the minute of the election, the Begistrary proceeds to record the above 
agreement. 



Rvles for residence and election 291 

his Lordship returned, which I was ordered by the Vice-Chanoellour to 
transcribe in this place as followeth : 

Drury House, 

AuffU9t IZth, 1681. 
Sir, 

Your and the rest of the Electors ready compliance with my 
recomendation of Robert Tophan to one of my late Brother's Exhibi- 
tions (signified by your letter received the other day) has verry much 
obliged mea I am alsoe sensible of your great pyety and care to fulfill 
my brothers Intention in his Will, which, I agree with you, could be 
noe other then that the Exhibitioners should continue and reside in the 
Vniuersity, and therefore doe fully concur with you in your Injunction 
of Residency upon the person now elect^ and desire that all future 
Elections into those Exhibitions may bee subject to such construction 
and condition. 

But as for Robert Pearce, being hee was not expresly limited, when 
elected, and (as you are pleased to obserue) has but little longer to 
enjoy it, I am content, if you and the rest of the Electors please, that 
hee hold it till his time expire. In the interim I shall endeauour to 
speak with him, haveing some intimation where to find him, and 
acquaint him with your and my sentiments upon his non-residency. 
I am in all readinesse to seme you, 

Sir, 
Your most affectionate 

frend and seruant, 

CRAVEN. 
For the Reuerend Dr. Humfrey Gower, 
Vice-Chancelor of the Vniuersity of Cambridge*. 



E. Rules for the choice of Lord Craven's Scholars, 
8 December, 1701. 

1. That the Vice-Chancellor upon the declaring a vacancy of one 
the said Scholarship by the majority of the electors shall within five 
days cause a writing under his hand, intimating the said vacancy, to 
be fixed at the door of the Publick Schooles, and that no Election shall 
be proceeded upon before fourteen days, nor deferred above three 
months after fixing the said instrument. 

2. That all Scholars, who desire to be candidates for the said 
Scholarship, shall present themselves within the said fourteen days 
to every one of the Electors, to be examined in the languages, whereof 
a Competent Skill in the Greek and Latin shall be a necessary qualifi- 
cation. 

* Collated with the original in the Registry, Vol zxxviii. 22. 24, 25. 

19—2 



292 Craven Scholarships 

3. That in relation to the difference of the Standing of each 
candidate an equitable consideration shall be had of their improve- 
ment in the arts and sciences. 

4. That within six days after the time limited for the said exami- 
nation the Vice-chancellor shall summon the Electors, and together 
with them shall agree upon the time and place for making the said 
Election. 

5. That he of those so examined, who shall be choosen by the 
mc^ority of the Electors then present, shall be deemed effectually 
choosen, provided there be present at least four of the Electors, 
whereof three at least consenting to the Election. 

6. That no deputies shall be allowed to vote. 

7. That no Scholar hereafter to be choosen shall be absent from 
the University without the leave of the Vice-Chancellor, pursuant to 
an order made by the Electors and approved off by a letter from the 
Right Honourable the Earle of Craven, dated August the 13, 1631, and 
that such absence shall not be allowed upon any account whatsoever 
for above three months in the year without a special licence from the 
Vioe-Chancellor and the major part of the Electors then present in the 
University^. 

Tho. Richardson Procan: 
W. Dawes 

Hen. James S. TheoL Profes: Rogius 
C. Roderick Provost of King's ColL 
Chr. Green Med. Profes. Reg. 
W°*Ayloffe OrafPub. 
Joshua Barnes Or. Prof. 
Geo. Grenden Regius in Jur. Civ. Professor 
31 Dec. 170}. 
At the Vicechancellor's Lodgings 
in Peter-House Dec. y« 8. 1701. 



F. Statement of proceedings at tlie election of a Scholar, 
26 October, 1724. 

Magistris Regentibus et non Regentibus Almee Universitatis Canta- 
brigiensis in Senatu congregatis: ReprsBsentatio Andrese Snape' Pro- 
cancellarii, Francisci Dickins Juris Civilis Professoris, et Christophori 
Greene Medicinse Professoris, trium ex Electoribus Scholaris ex 
Fundatione Honoratissimi Domini de Craven, Baronis de Ryton, in 
Exhibitionem jam vacantem. 

1 From the original in the Registry, Vol. xxxviii. 22. 4. 
« Provost of King's CoUege, X720-X743. 



A case of equality of votes 298 

Antedictis Electoribus vos certiorea facere visum est quod die 
quinto hujus mensiR Octobris convocatis per Procancellarium Regiis 
Professoribus et Oratore Publico (onmibusque prseter Grsacum Profes- 
Borem oompareutibus) Declaratio facta est de vacatione unius Exhibi- 
tionum Domini Craven per cessionem Magistri Johannis Walker : exinde 
Programmate a Domino Procancellario signato scholia publicis affixo et 
legitime dierum numero pro Candidatorum' Examinatioue prsBterito, 
iisdem rursus 26^ Octobris convocatis ad consentiendum de loco et 
tempore congruis ad Electionem faciendam : iidem preesentes qui priiis 
locum et tempus dicti Congressus unanimi Consensu assignaverunt; 
quodque proinde ad Sufiragia ferenda processum est: et Scrutinio 
habito compertum est tres Repradsentatores pro uno e Candidatis viz. 
Gulielmo Battie Su£fragia tulisse, Doctorem ver6 Bentley, Regium in 
Theologift Professorem, Doctorem Bouquet Hebraicsa Lingusa Professo- 
rem, et Doctorem Ajloffe Oratorem publicum pro alio, sc. Ricardo 
Bentlej. 

Et ulterius reprsBsentant quod ciim, propter Sufiragiorum pari- 
tatem, Electione nondum perfects, discessum fuisset, Dominus Pro- 
cancellarius diem 30°^ hujus Mensis indixit ad novimi Scrutinium 
habendum, Monitione pridie fact&, nee quoquam ex Electoribus vel 
reclamante vel uUo Prsetextu se excusante, ut ex Ministri summonentis 
testimonio liquet, et stata nihilominus die et hora tres Electores 
modd memoratos, Doctores nimirum Bentley, Bouquet et Ayloife, 
quasi de IndustriA se absentasse, ita ut, prsa l^timi eligentium numeri 
defectu, nihil concludi potuisset 

In hoc rerum Statu, Electione nullum vel habente vel habitura 
Exitum, nisi per vestrum luterventum: cumque Begulaa ad hasoe 
Electiones ordinandas a Syndicis vestris jampridem constitute in hac 
saltem Parte rnaucse sint, quod incertum prorsus reliquerint cuinam 
deferenda sit Determinatio, si ea sufiragiorum Paritas contigerit qu89 
nunc accidit; placuit Rem totam ad vos referri vestroque permittere 
judicio quonam potissimum modo ex ancipiti hac Controversia eluctan- 
dum sit^ 

A. Snape Procan. 

F. Dickins Juris Civilis Profess. R^. 

Chr. Green Med. Prof. Reg. 

Lect. per seniorem Procuratorom 

in plena Congregatione Regentium 

et Non-Regentium 31°» die Octobris, 1724. 

^ Grace Book I, pp. 120, 121. In the account of this affair drawn up by 
Lancelot Newton, Notary Public and deputy Begistrary of the University 
(BegiBtry, Vol. xxxviii. 22. 36 — 39) the Scholarships are described as '* Lord 
Craven's Exhibitions, commonly called University Scholarships." This is 
probably the first occasion in which the term '' University Scholarships " is 
Qsed in an official document. 



294 Battle Scholarship 

G. Order of the Court of Chancery, 9 March, 1819. 

This Court doth order that the anniiol allowance of twenty-five 
pounds each to the four poor scholars to be hereafter elected, as 
mentioned in the Testator's Will, be increased to the annual sum of 
fifty pounds each ; and that the number of scholars be increased by 
adding six more, to be elected in the same manner as the present 
scholars are elected, and as directed by the said Testator's Will, that 
is to say, three scholars from each of the Universities of Oxford and 
Cambridge, with the same annual allowance of fifty pounds each ; and 
that the said annual allowance to the said ten scholars shall cease 
after the expiration of seven years from the date of their election, or 
on any such scholars attaining to any preferment of double value ; and 
the same preference to poor scholars of the Testator's name and 
kindred, as mentioned in his Will, to be preserved with respect to the 
said six additional scholars ^ 

HL Order of the Court of Chancery, 22 June, 1841. 

His Lordship doth order that out of the surplus income of the 
Trust Estate and Funds in the petition mentioned an addition of 
twenty-five pounds per annum be made to each of the ten now existing 
scholarships in the petition mentioned, so as to make the yearly 
amount and value of each and every such ten scholarships the sum of 
seventy-five poimds a-piece*... 

I. Order of the Court of Chancery, 80 November, 1860. 

The ten existing Scholarships shall be increased by two... thus 
giving six Scholarships to Oxford and six to Cambridge.... The ad- 
ditional sum of £5 per annum shall be allowed for the maintenance 
of each holder present or future of one of the ten existing Scholar- 
ships and the sum of £80 per annum shall be allowed for the main- 
tenance of each holder of two additional Scholarships thus making 
an allowance for each of the said twelve Scholars of £80 per annum. 

2. Battie Scholarship. 

1747. 

In 1744 Dr William Battie', sometime fellow of King's 

College, B.A. 1726, M.A. 1730, M.D. 1737, who died 30 June, 

1776, made proposals to the University for founding a 

Scholarship, for the reasons set forth in his deed of gift (A). 

1 From a oopy in the Registry, Vol. zzxviii. 22. 54. * Ihid. 22. 68. 

« Diet, of Nat. Biogr. Vol. iii. p. 420 ; NichoU, Literary Anecdotes, 'v9, 699— 
612, 727; Monk, Life ofBentley, ii. p. 217. 



Deed of gift 296 

A Syndicate was appointed, 21 April, 1744, ''ad deliberandum 
de negotio inter Universitatem et Doctorem Battie^" and, 
21 June in the same year, the following Grace passed the 
Senate: 

Plaoeat Yobis ut Doctoris Battle liberalis Donatio pro uno discipulo 
sustentando juxta relationem Syndicorum vestrorum in hac parte 
constitutorum, lis Conditionibus a Yobis accipiatur quibus a dicto 
Doctore Battle proponitur*. 

It was further agreed that Dr Battie should be thanked 
by the Vice-Chancellor (Grace, 2 July, 1744)'. 

The deed of gift is dated 30 September, 1747. It was 
enrolled in the Court of Chancery, 7 November in the same 
year, and ordered to be sealed 14 November^ Dr Battie 
appointed the first Scholar 18 January, 1747-48. 

For the existing Statutes, etc. see Craven Scholarship, 
p. 285. 

A. Dr Battie'8 Deed of Gift, dated 30 September, 1747. 

This Indeuture, made tbe tbirtieth day of September, in the twenty- ao Sept 
first year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord George the Second, by the 
grace of Qod of Qreat Britain, France and Ireland King, Defender of 
the Faith, &c., and in the year of our Lord seventeen hundred and 
forty-seven, between William Battie, Doctor in Physick and Fellow of 
the College of Physicians in London, of the one part, And the Chan- 
cellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge, of the 
other part: 

Whereas the said William Battie was educated at King's College DrBaitie's 
in the said University of Cambridge, and during his Scholarship in the StoSJiS^ 
said College had one of the Exhibitions conmionly called Lord Craven's 
Exhibitions, given unto and conferred upon him, whereby he was 
enabled to maintain himself in the said University and encouraged to 
proceed in his Studies ; Now this Indenture witnesseth that the said 
William Battie, being duly sensible of the great benefit he received 
from the said Exhibition, and also considering that benefactions of this 
nature tend to the advancement of religion and learning, and are a 
great support to such Scholars who unhappily labour under indigent 
circumstances, out of a grateful sense of his own obligations to the BUid 
University, and as a perpetual acknowledgment for the same, and in 
consideration of the sum of five shilUngs of good and lawful money of 
Qreat Britain to the said William Battie in hand well and truly paid 



tion. 



> Grace Book I, p. 568. « Ibid. p. 670. 

• Ibid. p. 673. * Grace Book K, p. 



f 
f 



296 



Battle Scholarship 



DeKriptlon 
of the 
piopwtj 
siven to the 
unlyerdtf. 



Thenetrantk 
after dedoo- 
tionof ez- 
peiiaes,tobe 
~iid to sndi 



Br Battle 
maj ap- 
point 



by the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars at or before the sealing 
and delivery of these presents, the receipt whereof is hereby acknow- 
ledged, hath given,... unto the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, 
and their successors for ever, 

All that messuage or tenement with the appurtenances now or 
sometime heretofore called or known by the name of PogelPs, or by 
what other name or names soever the same is or hath been called or 
known, situate, lying and being in Hitcham in the county of Suffolk, 
and wherein one John Turner did formerly inhabit and dwell ; and all 
those several closes, pieces or parcels of ground with the appurtenances 
commonly called or known by the names of the Pightles, containing by 
estimation one acre, be the same more or less ; the lawn, containmg by 
estimation two acres and twenty poles, be the same more or less ; 
Great Hall Croft, containing by estimation two acres, one rood and 
fifteen poles, be the same more or less ; Little Hall Croft, containing 
by estimation one acre, two roods and four-and-twenty poles, be the 
same more or less ; a piece of land, parcel of the lawn, containing 
by estimation two acres, one rood and twenty poles, be the same 
more or less; Home Croft, containing by estimation three acres and 
five-and-twenty poles, be the same more or less ; Middle Croft, containing 
by estimation four acres, be the same more or less ; the meadow, 
containing by estimation two acres, one rood and four-and-thirty poles, 
be the same more or less ; Sitheridge's, containing by estimation two 
acres and one rood, be the same more or less ; Swaymere field, con- 
taining by estimation three roods and seven poles, be the same more or 
less ; and Swaymere's meadow, containing by estimation three roods 
and twenty-five poles, be the same more or less ;...all which said closes, 
pieces or parcels of ground are situate, lying and being in Hitcham 
aforesaid and in Brettenham, or in one of them, in the said county of 
Suffolk, and are now in the tenure or occupation of John Ransom, his 
assignee, assigns or under-tenants:... To have and to hold the said 
messuage or tenement, lands, [etc.] unto the said Chancellor, Masters 
and Scholars, and their successors,... for ever. 

And it is hereby declared by the said William Battie, and the said 
Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, that the gift, grant, bargain and sale 
of the said messuage or tenements... mentioned or intended to be 
hereby made unto the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, is and 
are so given,... in trust that the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, 
and their successors, shall pay the clear neat yearly rents issues and 
profits of all the said messuage or tenement, lands and premises, (after 
deduction of the money they shall from time to time lay out in repairs, 
and the charges they shall from time to time be put to in collecting 
the rents or any other matter or thing relating to the said trust,) by 
two half-yearly payments in the year, the first payment thereof to 
begin and be made upon the feast-day of Saint Michael the Archangel 
next ensuing the date hereof, for the term of three years, unto such 



Deed of gift 



297 



scbolftr of the said Uniyersitj of Cambridge as the said William Battie 
shall by any writing under his hand and seal direct and appoint, and 
80 from time to time as often as any vacancy shall happen during the 
life of the said William Battle^ : . . . 

And it is hereby further declared by and between the said William 
Battie and the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, that the Vice- 
Chancellor of the said University for the time being shall, after the 
decease of the said William Battie, and after the expiration of the term 
for which the scholar so last nominated shall be enabled to hold the 
said Exhibition, admit such scholar as shall be elected by such members 
of the said University in such manner and so qualified to take the said 
Exhibition and to hold the same for such time under and subject to 
the rules, conditions, limitations, and restrictions specified and declared 
in the instrument to these presents annexed ^ :... 

Provided always, and it is hereby further declared, that in case it 
shall happen after the decease of the said William Battie that such 
appointment, election and admission of such scholar in manner aforesaid 
shall not from time to time be made and completed within the space 
of three calendar months after the death of such scholar, either dying 
in the possession of the said exhibition, or after the expiration of the 
time limited and appointed for each such respective scholar to hold 
and enjoy the said exhibition, that then and in such case it shall and 
may be lawful to and for the Provost of King's College aforesaid for the 
time being, by any writing under his hand and seal, and even during 
his absence from the said college, to nominate and appoint at any time 
within six calendar months after the time elapsed for such appointment, 
election and admission as aforesaid, any scholar of the said University 
to succeed to and hold and enjoy the said Exhibition in such manner 
and for such time and under and subject to such rules, conditions, 
limitations, and restrictions as aforesaid ; and for want and in default 
of such nomination and appointment by the said Provost of King's 
College for the time being within six months as aforesaid, that then it 
shall and may be lawful to and for the right heirs of the said William 
Battie to enter into and upon the said messuage or tenement, lands 
and premises, and to hold and enjoy the same to them and their heirs 
for ever in as full and ample manner as if these presents had never 
been made^:... 

In witness whereof to one part of these present Indentures remaining 
with the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of 
Cambridge, the said William Battie hath set his hand and seal, and to 
the other part thereof remaining with the said William Battie, the said 
Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge have 
affixed their common seal the day and year first above written. 



After 

Dr BaiUe's 
death the 
Scholar 
is to be 
admitted 
br the Vioe- 
CnanoeUor 
aooordlng to 
the Rules 
annexed to 
this deed. 



If each ad- 
miislondoes 
not take 
place within 
Uiree 

months after 
a Scholar's 
death, the 
Provost 
of King's 
CoUc«e shall 
appoint 



If no ap- 
pointment 
be made, 
Dr Battle's 
heirs may 



sion of the 
property. 



^ The passages here omitted contain provisions depending on the life of 
Dr Battie. 



298 



BaUie Scholarship 



Slecton. 



Whatlflto 
b« done on 
ayacanof. 



Each candi- 
date to write 
a Latin 
letter to 
each elector. 



Dlsqnalifl- 
cationeof 
candidates. 



How the 
candidates 
are to be 
examined. 



Rvlea for the election of the Scholar. 

1. The Vice-Chancellor or his Deputy, the Provost of King's 
College, the King's Professors of Divinity, Law, and Physic, and the 
two Proctors for the time being, shall be the electors. And in case the 
Provost of King's College shall be absent from the University at the time 
of the examination of the candidates, or disabled by sickness or otherwise 
from attending the same ; in such case the Vice-Provost of the said 
college, or if he is absent from the said University or disabled by 
sickness or otherwise from attending the said examination, the senior 
Fellow then resident at college shall have a right to attend the said 
examination, and shall be one of the electors in the room of the said 
Provost. 

2. The Vice-Chancellor or his Deputy, upon every vacancy, shall 
summon the electors then resident in the University to such place as 
he shall think proper; and if a majority of the said electors thus met 
together shall then declare by any writing under their hands that the 
scholarship is vacant, the Vice-Chancellor or his Deputy shall within 
five days afterwards cause the said declaration to be affixed upon the 
door of the schools or other publick place belonging to the said Univer- 
sity. And the Vice-Chancellor or his Deputy shall likewise, in the same 
instrument containing the said declaration, appoint a time and place 
for the examination of the candidates. And no examination or election 
shall be proceeded upon till twenty-eight days are fully compleat and 
ended after the affixing the said declaration. 

3. Every candidate shall, within fourteen days after the affixing 
the said declaration, visit each of the electors then resident in the said 
University, and shall give notice by a Latin epistle to such elector that 
he is a candidate : and in case he neglects visiting in manner aforesaid 
within that time he shall be incapable of being elected. 

4 No one shall be capable of being elected who has been admitted 
into the college he first belonged to above three years, or who is any 
ways entitled to receive any benefit or advantage from either of the 
Exhibitions commonly called Lord Craven's Exhibitions. And in case 
any person after his being elected and admitted to hold and enjoy this 
scholarship shall be admitted to or any ways entitled to hold and enjoy 
the said Lord Craven's Exhibition, his right to this scholarship shall 
thencefrom absolutely cease and determine. 

5. The electors and candidates shall be present together at the 
time and place appointed in the said declaration ; and the said candi- 
dates shall be examined before one another in the presence of each other 
by such of the electors who shall then be present, to the intent that 
the candidates may be witnesses of each other's abilities, and that all 
partiality may, as much as possible, be prevented in the electors. And 
no candidate shall be capable of being elected who shall not have been 



Rvles for dectian of scholar 299 

80 examined, nor shall any elector have a right to vote who was not 
present at the said examination. 

6. A competent skill in the Greek and Latin languages shall be a Aoompetaat 
necessary qualification. But in respect to the difference of standing of Greek and 
of each candidate an equitable consideration shall be had of their quind. 
improvement in the arts and sciencea 

7. As soon as the examination is ended, the Vice-chancellor or his The vio^ 



Deputy shall declare to the electors then present the time and place he to flz the 
appoints for making the election. place of 

8. He of those so examined who shall be chosen by a majority ^^J^^ 
of the electors then present at the time and place before appointed, g^^ 
and who were present at the said examination, shall be deemed elected, 
effectually chosen. And in case there should happen an equality of 

votes upon two or more candidates, he shall be deemed effectually chosen 
whom the Provost of King's College, if he is then present and was 
present at the said examination, shall declare for. And in case the 
said Provost is not then present, or was not present at the said 
examination, he shall be deemed effectually chosen whom the Vice- 
chancellor or his Deputy shall declare for. 

9. Every scholar, during the time of his enjoying this scholarship, Beddenoeof 
shall reside at least nine calendar months every year in the University, 

except he is a graduate in physick or designs to profess the same, and 
produces once every year, if required by any of the electors, a certificate 
signed by one hospital physician in London, or bills of mortality, 
signifying that the said scholar diligently attends the said physician in 
visiting the patients of the said hospital ; in which case my intention 
is that the residence of such scholar in the University shall be hereby 
absolutely dispensed with during his attending upon the said physician. 
But no other scholar shall be absent above three calendar months every 
year from the University without leave granted to him, under the 
hands of the major part of the electors then present in the University : 
and in case he absents himself for a longer time without such leave his 
right to this scholarship shall immediately cease and determine. But 
my intention and desire is that the electors shall not be difficult in 
granting such leave provided it is not longer than for one year at once, 
which leave however may be renewed in like manner from year to year 
in case the scholar can satisfy a major part of the electors then present 
in the University that he is prosecuting his studies during such his 
absence, and in case that he brings, when required by any of the 
electors, a certificate of his good behavioiu: under the hands of three or 
more neighbouring clergymen of the Church of England, provided 
likewise he continues a member of the University. 

10. When any scholar shall have been admitted nine years into Howionira 
the college to which he first belonged, or shall have obtained any majbehefi. 
ecclesiastical benefice or preferment, his right to enjoy this scholarship 

shall then cease and determine. But it shall and may be lawful 



300 Davies Scholarship 

nevertheless for any scholar to continue to hold and enjoy this scholar- 
ship for such time as aforesaid, notwithstanding such scholar shall after 
such election and admission to the same have obtained a fellowship in 
some one college of the University of Cambridge. 
Sd5>neM ^^- ^^ *^® Provost of King's College shall happen to be Vioe- 

of*^S?^ Chancellor at the time of the said examination and election, in such 
Coli^w^ case the Vice- Provost of King's College, or if he Lb absent or otherwise 
oelior. disabled from attending the same, the senior Fellow then resident in 

the said college shall be one of the electors, and the Vioe-Chanoellor, 
if there should happen an equality of votes, shall, in this case, have a 
casting vote. 
to*Si£^^*?* 12. If any doubt shall arise after my decease touching the intent 
theie ndm. and meaning of any of the aforesaid rules, or of such as I may hereafter 
give, which I reserve to myself to do, the same shall be interpreted and 
determined by the Provost of King's College, and his determination 
shall be acquiesced in by the electors and scholars. 

W. BATTIER 

3. Da VIES Scholarship. 
1810. 

Dr Jonathan Davies', sometime Fellow of King's College, 
Headmaster and Provost of Eton College, by Will dated 
24 July, 1804, made the following bequest to the University: 

I give and bequeath to the Vice Chancellor for the time being and 
to the Provost of King's College in the University of Cambridge in 
trust one thousand pounds of my same three per centa to form a 
Scholarship to be called Dr Davies's University Scholarship on the 
same footing with those called the Craven University Scholarships for 
the greatest proficient in classical learning the candidates to be the 
same the same examiners only with the addition of the Provost of 
King's College. 

This I do remembering that I was so fortunate as to get one of the 
said University Scholarships and as probably the considerations of my 
circumstances (recommended by the Founder or Founders of those 
Scholarships) weighed greatly in my favoiu*, I will that the same 
circumstances be attended to in the disposal of my Scholarship by the 
Examiners and that it be enjoined by the candidate on whom the 
majority of the examiners agree to bestow it the same number of 
years as the above mentioned Craven Scholarships'. 

^ From a copy in the Registry, Vol. xzxviii. 7. 1. The deed is printed in 
full in EndowmenU, ed. 1876, pp. 121—129. 

s B.A. 1760, M.A. 1763, D.D. 1774: elected FeUow of King's CoUege, 
2 Feb. 1759; Headmaster of Eton, 1773-91; Provost, 1791-1809. 

> From the Probate Registry, Somerset House, London ; Registry, Vol. 
xxxviii. 24. 1. 



Bett Scholarships 301 

Dr Da vies died 5 December, 1809, and his Will was 
proved 29 January, 1810. The bequest was not accepted by 
Grace. The first Scholar was elected 19 December, 1810. 

For the rules of election, etc., affecting this Scholarship, 
see Craven Scholarship, p. 285. 



4. Bell Scholarships. 
1810. 

The Reverend William Bell*, sometime Fellow of Magdalene 
College, B.A. 1753, M.A. 1756, D.D. by royal mandate, 1767, 
Prebendary of Westminster 1765 to his death 29 September, 
1816, founded eight Scholarships according to the provisions 
set forth in the following deed (A), dated 18 July, 1810. It 
was ordered to be sealed by Grace, 30 July*; and inrolled in 
Chancery 14 August, in the same year. 

The seventh regulation directs that no candidate is to 
be permitted to sit who " is manifestly well able to bear his 
own expenses." This regulation was altered by Mr Bell in 
1812, and a new regulation (B), endorsed by him on the 
deed of gift, was ordered to be sealed 6 February in that 
year', 

A new statute for these Scholarships was framed by the 
Council of the Senate, 23 November, 1857 ; confirmed (with 
some changes) 3 December, 1857; and approved by the 
Queen in Council 6 April, 1858*. 

In 1858 (13 December) the Council of the Senate pro- 
posed to substitute for the ex officio electors named by the 
Founder " four members of the Senate appointed by Grace 
of the Senate at the last Congregation in November in every 
year." This recommendation was rejected, 10 February, 
1859; and the Council then proposed (11 February) the 
regulations now in force, which were accepted by the Senate 
17 February, 1859'. By these regulations the Vice-Chancellor, 

1 JHcU of Nat, Biogr. Vol. ir. p. 176. See also Milner's Life of Isaac 
Milner, 8to. Lond. 1842, pp. 408, 407. 

> Grace Book M, p. 18. * Ibid. p. 54. 

* Statutei, ed. 1896, p. 102. 
' Ordifiancest ed. 1901, p. 545. 



802 Bdl Scholarships 

the Regius Professor of Divinity, and the Lucasian Professor 
of Mathematics are to examine ex officio, with two members 
of the Senate appointed by Grace. 

In 1886 (8 February) the Council of the Senate pub- 
lished a report* in which they recommended (among other 
things) that of the three examiners appointed for this 
Scholarship (counting the Vice-Chancellor's deputy as one) 
" two should examine, specially but not of necessity exclu- 
sively, in Classics, and one in Mathematics." This recom- 
mendation was confirmed by Grace, 11 March, 1886*. 



A. Deed of foundation, dated 18 July, 1810. 

18 July, This Indenture, made the eighteenth day of July in the fiftieth 

year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord George the Third,... and in the 
year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ten, between the 
Reverend William Bell, Doctor in Divinity, Prebendary of the Colle- 
giate Church of St. Peter in Westminster, of the one part; and the 
Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge, of 
the other part. 
Help for Whereas, in order to give encouragement to learning, and to assist 

in^Be^Sng Clergymen of the Church of England in sending their sons to the 
Sunbridg^ University, whose circumstances and situations are altogether such as 
not to enable them to bear the whole of that expense, as well as to assist 
orphans of Clergymen imder similar circumstances in obtaining the 
benefit of an University education, the said William Bell hath trans- 
ferred the sum of fifteen thousand two hundred pounds three per cent 
consolidated Bank annuities, in the books of the Gk>vemor and Com- 
pany of the Bank of England, to the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars 
of the University of Cambridge. 
TheUniver- Now it is hereby declared and agreed by and between the said 
jsil,200 s^per parties, and the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars do hereby 
SSit ^ declare that they, the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, and their 
successors, will stand possessed of the said fifteen thousand two hun- 
dred pounds three per cent, consolidated Bank annuities upon the 
several trusts and for the several ends, intents and purposes herein- 
after expressed, that is to say: 
•nd to 1. Upon trust that they the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, 

dividend!, and their successors, shall receive the dividends arising on the said 
Bank annuities as they shall become due, and apply them to the 
purposes herein appointed, that is to say, 

J Reporter, 9 February, 1886, p. 396. « Ibid. 16 March, p. 610. 



Deed of foundation 



303 



2. The said trustees shall cause to be elected from among the 
undergraduates of the said UnivOTsity eight persons ; namely, two of 
the third year, two of the second year, and four of the first year of 
standing, who shall be sons of Clergymen of the Church of England, 
circumstanced as is above described, or orphans of Clergymen similarly 
circumstanced, to be scholars upon this foundation, and they shall be 
elected at the following times, and under the following limitations. 

1810. The first election shall take place between the twelfth day 
of November and the twentv-fifth day of December in this present 
year one thousand eight hundred and ten, when there shall be elected 
two Scholars of the third year, that is, in their third year of standing, 
who were admitted between the commencements of one thousand eight 
himdred and seven and one thousand eight hundred and eight, and the 
profits of their scholarships shall commence from the sixth day of July 
in this present year one tnousand eight hundred and ten, and be con- 
tinued for two years, that is to the sixth day of July one thousand 
eight hundred and twelve, when these scholars will have become com- 
plete Bachelors of Arts ; and at the same time there shall likewise be 
elected two other scholars, called scholars of the second year, who 
were admitted between the commencements of one thousand eight 
hundred and eight and one thousand eight hundred and nine, and the 
profits of their scholarships shall commence also from the sixth of July 
m this present year one thousand eight hundred and ten, and be con- 
tinued for three years, that is, to the sixth of July one thousand eight 
hundred and thirteen, when these scholars likewise will have become 
complete Bachelors of Arts. 

1811. The second election shall take place on the Friday after 
Midlent Sunday one thousand eight hundred and eleven, when there 
shall be elected two other scholars, called scholars of the first year, 
who were admitted between the commencements of one thousand eight 
hundred and nine and one thousand eight hundred and ten, and the 
profits of their scholarships shall commence also from the sixth day of 
July of the present year one thousand eight hundred and ten, and be 
continued for four years, that is, to the sixth of July one thousand 
eight hundred and fourteen, when these scholars likewise will have 
become complete Bachelors of Arts. 

1812. The third election shall take place on the Friday after 
Midlent Sunday one thousand eight hundred and twelve, when there 
shall be elected two other scholars of the first year, who were admitted 
between the commencements of one thousand eight hundred and ten 
and one thousand eight hundred and eleven, and the profits of their 
scholarships shall commence from the sixth of July one thousand eight 
hundred and eleven, and be continued for four years, that is, to the 
sixth of July one thousand eight hundred and fifteen, when these 
scholars likewise will have become complete Bachelors of Arts. 

1813. The fourth election shall take place on the Friday after 
Midlent Sunday one thousand eight hundred and thirteen, when there 
shall be elected two other scholars of the first year to succeed the two 
scholars of the third year, who were two of the four scholars first 
chosen, according to the same plan, and under the same conditions as 
before; and in Uke manner, two scholars of the first year shall be 
elected on the Friday after Midlent Sunday in every year after for 
ever, to succeed the two scholars whose profits shall have ceased on the 
sixth day of July preceding. 



Wbfttimder- 
giadnatee 
majte 
elected. 



i>ate8 0f 
election and 
length of 
tenura 
In 1810. 



In 1811. 



In 1812. 



In 1813. 



304 



Bdl Scholarships 



No Schohtra 
to be elected 
from King's 
College or 
TrinllyHAU. 
Two of the 
Mune family 
forbidden. 



Everv 
Soholar 
most pro- 
mleeto 



No under- 
grmduate 
majbea 
candidate 
who ie able 
to bear hie 



Bankers. 



flalf-jearlr 
paymente to 
the Scholars. 



Howmnch 
each Scholar 
istoreoaiye. 



3. It is the particular request of the said William Bell, that the 
Vice-Chancellor, the Regius Professor of Divinity, the Regius Professor 
of Civil Law, the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics, and the Public 
Orator will take the trouble of electing the said scholars in such 
manner as they shall determine upon. And in case of the absence or 
illness of either of the said electors, it is the request of the said 
William Bell that a deputy may be chosen by a Grace of the Senate. 
And if it shall at any time happen that two of the said offices consti- 
tuting an elector shall be held by one and the same person, it is also 
the request of the said William Bell that a substitute for the elector in 
respect of the office last coming to him may be also appointed by a 
Grace of the Senate. 

4 The said scholars shall not be elected from King's College or 
from Trinity Hall, but from every other college in the University 
without favour or partiality to any college. 

5. No person shall ever have two sons scholars, nor shall there be 
two orphan brothers scholars upon this foundation at one and the 
same time. 

6. Every scholar elected on this foundation shall promise to take 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the most r^ular manner by perform- 
ing the exercises, and undergoing the examinations appointed by the 
University for that piurpose, which promise shall be written in a book 
and signed by him. 

7. As it is the special object of this foundation, upon a strict 
attention to which its real utility will ultimately depend, to assist such 
Clergymen, and such only, as well as such orphans, and such only, as 
really stand in need of assistance, the said electors shall carefully make 
inquiry into the situation and circumstances of all those under- 
graduates who may be desirous of obtaining these scholarships, and 
shall not permit any one to sit as a candidate for them who is mani- 
festly well able to bear his own expenses, and of such as they shall 
judge it proper to admit to sit as candidates, they shall prefer those, 
when personal merits are equal, who they are conscientiously convinced, 
all circumstances considered, stand most in need of assistance. In kU 
eligendis prciecipua ratio temper habeatur tngenity doctrinas^ viHutiSj et 
tnopicte; ut quo magu quisque ex digendorum numero his rebus ocuteros 
antecellatf eo magis, ut aequum estj praefercUur, 

8. The above-named trustees shall empower the same banking 
firm in London to receive the dividends arising on the said Bank 
annuities as they empower to receive the dividends on the other stocks 
belonging to the University. And they shall make half-yearly pay- 
ments to the respective college tutors of the said scholars for the use of 
the scholars themselves in the following manner, that is to say : 

9. That so long as the property-tax continues to be levied at the 
rate of 10 per cent, and the clear annual income arising from the said 
stock is no more than four hundred and ten pounds and eight shillings^ 



Deed of foundation 305 

they shall pay the sum of fifty pounds in each year to each of the said 
scholars, reserving in their hands annually the sum of ten pounds and 
eight shillings ; and when the property -tax shall be either lessened, or 
suspended, or increased, they shall divide the whole clear income 
arising from the said stock equally between the said scholars, except 
only reserving always the sum of ten pounds. And the said sum of 
ten pounds so reserved shall be applied to the purpose of defraying the 
expense of a dinner for the electors, which dinner shall be had either 
on the day of the annual election of the scholars, or on such other day 
very shortly after it as the electors shall appoint. And the eight 
shillings which at the present rate of the property-tax will remain, shall 
be applied to whatever purpose the electors shall approve. 
\0\ 

11. It is the particular request of the said William Bell that the JJ'g,'***^ 
electors of the scholars may be appointed auditors of the accounts of Muiiton. 
this institution. 

12. If it shall happen that any scholar elected on this foundation What ii to 
shall die while he is only in his third year of standing or sooner, the a JS^r 
said electors shall as soon as may be proceed to elect another scholar ^ 
qualified as already described, of the same year in standing with the 
deceased, who shall enjoy the profits of his scholarship as long as the 
deceased scholar would have enjoyed them. But if any scholar should 
happen to die when only one half-yearly payment from his scholarship 
remains unpaid to him, that payment shall be made to the college tutor 

of the deceased scholar for the payment of any debts he may have left, 
or for the use of his father or family. 

13. If it shall happen that any scholar elected on this foundation What ii to 
shall degrade, or determine to go out in what is called a bye-term, or a J^Ur 
declare for law, or be rusticated or expelled, his scholarship shall be fiUnanJ^iS^y 
ip9o facto vacant immediately upon such degrading, determining to go *«»J«l»'- 
out in a bye-term, declaring for law, rustication or expulsion, and any 
payment from his scholarship which may be actually due to him at the 

time of such degrading, determining to go out in a bye-term, declaring 
for law, rustication or expulsion, shall be forfeited and divided equally 
among the other scholars, and if such vacating of a scholarship shall 
take place either in the third year of standing of the vacating scholar, 
or sooner, the electors shall as soon as may be elect another scholar 
qualified as above required, and of the same standing with the former, 
who shall enjoy the profits of his scholarship for the same period as the 
vacating scholar would have enjoyed them ; but if such vacancy shall 
take place when only one half-yearly payment from his scholarship 
remains unpaid to the vacating scholar, that payment shall be divided 
equally among the other scholars. 

1 This role is of a temporary oharaoter. 
C. 20 



306 



Bdl Scholarships 



In certain 
cawsMinBof 
Uymen m»7 
be elected. 



Ckxtof 
printing the 
loundauon 
deed to be 
defrayed out 
of thetmat- 
fond. 



The deed to 
be read at 
erexT meet- 
ing for the 
election of 
whoLara. 



14. In case it shall at an7 time happen that no sons or orphans of 
Clergymen circumstanced as this foimdation requires shall he found 
desirous of heing elected to these scholarships, or if any son or orphan 
of a clergyman admitted to sit as a candidate for them shall he deemed 
hy the electors unfit to he elected, and no other son or orphan of a 
Clergyman qualified as ahove required shall he found to fill the vacancy, 
then, and in these cases only, the electors shaU elect sons of laymen, 
heing undergraduates who stand in need of assistance, not sons of 
Clergymen who are well ahle to hear their own expenses. 

15. If the electors shall deem it expedient to print copies of, or 
extracts from this Foundation-Deed, to be given to the heads and 
tutors of the several colleges from which the scholars are to be elected, 
as well as to the scholars themselves, they are hereby authorised to 
pay the expense occasioned by it by an equal deduction from the next 
half-yearly payment to the scholars. 

16. When the electors meet to elect the scholars, the business shall 
always be entered upon by having this Foundation- Deed read aloud by 
one of the electors to the rest. 

In witness whereof the said William Bell hath hereunto set his hand 
and seal, and the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars their corporate' 
seal, the day and year first above written^. 



The pe- 
cuniary po- 
sition of 
candidates 
need not be 
considered. 



This en- 
dorsement 
to be read 
with the 
foundation- 



B. The seventh reguLatioriy as altered, 1812. 

Whereas, by the seventh clause in the within written Foundation 
Deed, it is agreed and ordered that the electors to the Scholarships by 
the same Indenture founded shall not permit any one to sit as a 
candidate for them, who is manifestly well able to bear his own 
expenses: Now it is hereby agreed and ordered, that the said limita- 
tion shall from henceforth be repealed, and that sons and orphans of 
Clergymen shaU be allowed to sit as candidates for the said scholar- 
ships without any objection being made to them on account of their 
pecuniary circumstances. But that in electing the scholars from among 
the candidates, the electors shall govern themselves conscientioiisly by 
the following rule, so that the different circumstances of the candidates, 
as well as their merits, shall be allowed their due weight and influence 
in the choice : In his digendis praecipua ratio semper haheatur ingenixy 
doctrinae, virtutis, et inopiae; ut quo magis quisque ex eligendorwm 
numero his rebus antecellat, eo magis, ut aequum est, pra^ferattur. 

And whereas, in the said Foundation- Deed it is directed that when- 
ever the electors meet to elect the scholars, the business shall be 
entered upon by having the Foundation- Deed read aloud by one of the 

1 From the original in the Begistry of the University, Box G, Ko. 19. 



Pitt Scholarship 307 

electors to the rest: Now it is hereby directed that as often as the 
said Foundation-Deed is so read, this endorsement shall be read in the 
same manner immediately after it. 

In witness whereof the said William Bell hath hereunto set his SQJanaur, 

1811. 

hand and seal, and the said Chancellor, Masters and Scholars their 
corporate seal, the twenty-ninth day of January, in the year of our 
Lord one thousand eight hundred and twelve. 

(Signed) Wm. BELLI. 



5. Pitt Scholarship. 
1813. 

The Committee of resident Members of the Senate 
appointed 24 March, 1806, to collect subscriptions for a 
statue of the Right Honourable William Pitt, to be placed 
in the Senate-House, finding that the amount subscribed 
was considerably in excess of that required for the statue, 
decided, 7 April, 1813, to make the oflfer to the University 
contained in the following letter', addressed to the Vice- 
Chancellor, and read by him to the Senate, 8 April, 1813 : 

Sir, 

The Committee for managing the subscription for Mr Pitt's 
Statue beg leave to oflFer to the University of Cambridge the sum of 
one thousand pounds to found a scholarship, to be entitled The Pitt 
Scholarship^ on the same general plan as those founded by Lord Craven. 

Signed by order of the Committee, 

J. BROWNS, Secretary. 

A Grace was then read, and passed on the following day, 
thanking the Committee, and appointing a Syndicate to 
consider what course should be taken with regard to the 
gift. Before this Syndicate had time to report, the London 
Pitt Club oflfered £600 to augment the endowment. «A 
second Grace was therefore passed (19 May) accepting this 

1 From the original in the Begistiy of the University, Box G, No. 19. 

* Minutes of the Committee, preserved in the Registry, No. 46, 46^. The 
letter is copied in Grace Book M, p. 84. For the history of the statae see 
Afth, Hist, iii. 60. 

* Bev. John Brown, Fellow of Trinity College: B.A. 1799, M.A. 1802. 

20—2 



308 



PiU Scholarship 



gift with thanks, and including it in the reference to the 
former Syndicated 

The following Rules (A), drawn up by the Syndicate, 
were read to the Senate 9 December, 1813, and approved by 
Grace on the same day*. 

A new statute for this scholarship and for the Craven, 
Battie, and Da vies in common, was proposed by the Council 
of the Senate, 23 November, 1857, accepted by the Senate 
8 December, and, having been adopted by the Commissioners, 
received the royal assent, 16 April, 1861. 



Capital to 
belnvestod 
in the public 
fondB. 



Eleeton. 



When the 
Tftcancyia 
to be de- 
dared. 



A. Rides for the Pitt Scholarship, 9 December, 1813. 

1. The sum of £1,000 given by the subscribers to Mr Pitt's Statue 
for the purpose of founding the Pitt Scholarship^ and which has since 
been augmented by a donation of £500 from the Pitt Club in London, 
shall be placed in the publick Funds, until the Syndics shall be able to 
vest it in land ; and the clear annual income arising from it shall be 
paid to the Pitt Scholar. 

2. The Vice-Chancellor or his deputy, the Publick Orator, the 
Greek Professor, and two members of the Senate, to be appointed by 
the different colleges in their turns, shall be the electors. Two colleges, 
according to the cycle of Proctors, commencing with the year 1817, 
shall respectively nominate an elector. But, if the Vice-Chancellor, 
the Publick Orator, and the Greek Professor, or any two of them, be 
members of the same college, no elector in that case shall be appointed 
by that collie according to the cycle of Proctors, but the appointment 
shall be made by the University. Or, if the Publick Orator or the 
Greek Professor shall be prevented by illness or otherwise from attend- 
ing the examination, or if the colleges shall have neglected to signify to 
the Vice-Chancellor the appointment of the electors according to their 
respective turns, then Deputies shall be appointed by Grace. 

3. The first examination shall commence on Monday, January the 
17th, 1814 ; and the Vice-Chancellor or his deputy, the Publick Orator, 

1 For these Graces see Grace Book M, pp. 84, 85. They are printed in 
Endowments, ed. 1876, p. 142. The Orator's letter of thanks, in English, is 
in Grace Book M, p. 91. It was read to the Senate, and ordered to be 
sealed, 5 July, 1818. Ibid. p. 94. 

* Grace Book M, p. 108. The Ghraoe was in the following terms : Placeat 
Vobis, at ordinationes modo lectn, vestra aactoritate raUe, vim Statatornm 
obtineant, et in libris Procancellarii et Procuratorom intra qoindeoim dies 
inscribantor. 



TyrwhUt Scholarships 309 

and the Greek Professor, shall, in future, on or hefore the first day of 
Deoember after every vacancy, cause a writing under their hands, 
declaring the said vacancy and the time of examination, to be affixed 
to the door of the Publick Schools ; and they shall notify the same to 
the two colleges which are to nominate the electors, and the Heads of 
those colleges, or their deputies, shall, within one week after such 
notices, signify to the Vice-Chancellor the names of the electors so 
appointed. 

4 The examination, which shall be solely classical, shall always ^{®*J®*" 
take place during the week of the publick examinations in the Senate- 
House, previous to the Bachelors* Commencement; and the scholar 
elected shall receive all the dividends or rents that shall have become 
due subsequent to the last vacancy. 

5. Any undergraduate, of whatever rank, may be a candidate for '^^^^J^ 
the Pitt Scholarship^ provided he be not of more than three years' 
standing from the time of his first residence ; but he shall, on or before 
the 31st day of December preceding the examination, signify, in a 

Latin epistle to each of the electors his intention of becoming a 
candidate, and in case he shall omit sending such an epistle, he shall 
be considered as incapable of being elected at that time. 

6. The Pitt Scholar shall not hold any other University scholar- The Pitt 

, . ^ J Scholar may 

ship. not hold 

7. Every scholar shall, during the time of his holding this scholar- schoiuship. 
ship, reside the major part of every term ; and if he shall not have Most keep 
kept such residence, he shall vacate his scholarship, unless he has been 
prevented by illness or any other cause which shall be approved of by 

the Vice-Chancellor, the Publick Orator, and the Qreek Professor. 

8. Every scholar who shall obtain any ecclesiastical benefice or When he 
preferment, or shall be of Master of Arts standing, shall vacate his 
scholarship ^ 



6. Tyrwhitt Scholarships. 
1817. 

The Reverend Robert Tyrwhitt, sometime Fellow of 
Jesus College, B.A. 1757, M.A. 1760, who died 25 March, 
1817", made the following bequest to the University, by Will 
dated 19 September, 1815 : 

...1 give and bequeath unto the Chancellor Masters and Scholars 
of the University of Cambridge, the principal sum of four thousand 

1 Grace Book M, pp. 105-^108. 

* GentlemaiCt Magazine, Vol. Izzxvii. Pt. i. p. 286. 



310 Ti/rwhiU Scholarships 

pounds stock in the Navy five per cent. Annuities In trust for the sole 
encouragement of a general study of the Hebrew Language in the said 
University ^ 

Some delay occurred in settling Mr Tyrwhitt*s affairs*, 
and the Senate was not informed officially of the bequest 
until the end of the year, when (3 December) a Grace was 
passed appointing a Syndicate to make regulations, with the 
proviso that they should report within three months'. The 
appointment of this Syndicate implies acceptance of the 
bequest by the University. 

The Regulations prepared by the Syndicate (A), are 
dated 18 February, and were approved by Grace 8 April, 
1818. They recommend the founding of three Scholarships, 
with rules for the election and the Scholars, and also the 
setting apart a fifth portion of the income to form a fund 
for the promotion of Hebrew learning. These regulations 
were to remain in force for six years from 1 June, 1819. 
The first Scholar was elected in that year. 

In 1825 (20 April) a Sjmdicate was appointed to revise 
the Regulations, on the understanding that they completed 
their work before Commencement*. The new code, however, 
is dated 6 March, and was confirmed by Grace 14 March, 
1826*. The most important change is that six Scholars are 
to be elected, two in each year, who are to be called Scholars 
of the first class and second class respectively. These 
regulations were to remain in force till 1 January, 1830. A 
fr'esh revision then took place, and new rules, dated 22 April, 
were approved by Grace 12 May', but the changes are not 
of sufficient importance to make it necessary to print them^. 

^ Registry of Wills, Somerset House, London. The Will was proved 
14 April, 1817. Registry, Vol. xxxviii. 60. 2. 

' W. Frend to H.R.H. the Duke of Gloucester, Ghanoellor, dated 5 May, 
1817. Registry, Vol. xxxnu. 60. 1. 

* Grace Book M, p. 241. The Grace is printed in EndowmenU, ed. 1876, 
p. 145. 

* Grace Book N, p. 70. 

* Ibid. p. 121. These regulations are printed in Gnnning's CeremonUit 
ed. 1828, pp. 851—854. 

* Grace Book N, p. 290. 

' They are printed in the Univenity Calendar for the years during which 
they were in force. 



Regvlatioiis 311 

They were to remain in force till the first Congregation in 
the Lent Term, 1836, when the usual Grace for a revising 
Syndicate passed the Senate (2 March), and their edition 
of the regulations was approved by Grace 24 March. This 
was the last complete revision, for, 15 December, 1841, it 
was agreed that the existing Rules should remain in force 
until it was the pleasure of the Senate to alter them\ 

In 1857, in consequence of a diminution in the income 
of the fund, it was proposed by a Syndicate appointed 
19 March, to suppress three scholarships, and to establish 
instead a Prize in Arabic and Syriac of the value of £15 ; 
but the report proposing this change, dated 24 March, was 
rejected (30 April) by 29 Non Placet to 11 Placet. 

Soon afterwards a Committee was formed to collect 
subscriptions with a view to augmenting the original capital, 
and in 1862 the Vice-Chancellor was able to inform the 
Senate that the Scholarships could in Aiture be maintained 
at the rate contemplated in 1836 (B). 



A, RegulcUions, approved by Grace, 8 April, 1818. 

1. That three Scholarships shall be founded, to be called TyrwhUfs Naine^ 
Hebrew Scholarships. 

2. That the candidates for these Scholarships shall be Bachelors of ^^.5JH^ 
Arts, who are not of sufficient standing to be created Masters of Arts, 

and students in Civil Law or Medicine of not less than four or more 
than seven years' standing, who shall be required, before they are 
admitted to become candidates, to produce certificates from their 
respective Professors that they have kept the exercises necessary for 
the degree of Bachelors of Law or Physic. 

3. That four-fifths of the clear annual proceeds of the bequest shall nivialon of 
be equally divided among the three Scholars. 

4. That the remaining fifth shall form a fund to be employed from Fund to 

111 1 1111 J TOomote 

tune to time, by the electors, m such a manner as they shall deem Hebrew 

most conducive to the promotion of Hebrew learning. 

6. That the electors to these scholarships shall be the Vice-Chan- ittecton. 

oellor, the Regius Professor of Hebrew, the Professor of Arabic, and 

two members of the Senate to be nominated by the dififerent Colleges, 

according to the cycle of Proctors. 



1 Oraoe Book S, p. 286. See Ordinances, ed. 1901, p. 561. 



312 



Tyfwhitt Scholarships 



DepatiM. 



When the 
lord Al- 
moner's 
Beaderln 
Ambicdudl 
examine. 



Elector to be 
appointed 
byOraoe 
In certain 



Snbjecte of 

exam! 

tlon. 



First elec- 
tion. 

When the 
examination 
Is to begin. 
Second 
and third 
elections. 



scholarship 
to be held 
for three 
jears. 



What Is to 
be done 
when a 
scholar dies. 



Stipends and 

BQZldllS. 



6. That if the Regius Professor of Hebrew, or the Professor of 
Arabic, or both of them, shall decline or be prevented from examining, 
a deputy or deputies shall be appointed by Qrace of the Senate, ex- 
cepting when the Lord Almoner's Reader in Arabic does not hold 
either of the above Professorships; in which case he shall be the 
deputy, if only one is required, or one of the deputies, if two are 
required. 

7. That if it shall happen at any time that two of the Offices 
severally constituting electors are united in one and the same person, 
the deputy for the elector in respect of one of the said Offices shall, 
according to the circumstances stated in the foregoing resolution, be 
either the Lord Almoner's Reader in Arabic, or be appointed by Qrace 
of the Senate ; And if in any case the Lord Almoner's Reader in Arabic 
shall decline the office of deputy examiner or shall be prevented from 
undertaking the said office, a deputy examiner shall be appointed, in 
his plcLce, by Grace of the Senate. 

8. That if the Vice-Ohancellor, the Regius Professor of Hebrew, 
the Professor of Arabic, or any two of them, shall be members of the 
same College, no elector shall in that case be appointed by that College 
according to the cycle of Proctors ; but the appointment thall be made 
by Qrace of the Senate. 

9. That the examination shall be primarily in the Hebrew Scrip- 
tures of the Old Testament : secondarily in such other Hebrew Works 
and in such exercises as the Examiners shall judge most likely to assist 
and advance the knowledge of the sacred Writings. 

10. That the first Scholar shall be elected in 1819, and the exami- 
nation shall, in that and every subsequent year, commence on the first 
Wednesday after the first of May. 

11. That a second Scholar shall be elected in 1820, and a third in 
1821. 

12. That the scholarship of the first elected scholar shall be deemed 
vacant on May 1, 1822, and so on ; so that a scholarship shall become 
vacant every year, and each Scholar shall hold his Scholarship for the 
space of three years to be reckoned from the first of May preceding his 
election. 

13. That should any Scholar vacate his Scholarship by death, or 
resignation, or other cause, the Electors shall, as soon as conveniently 
may be, elect another Scholar in his place, who shall enjoy the profits 
of his scholarship so long as the vacating Scholar would have enjoyed 
them ; but if the vacating Scholar shall have held his scholarship for 
more than two years, the profits of the remaining year shall go to him 
or his legal representative, and the examination of candidates to fill 
the vacancy shall not commence before the usual time. 

14 That the first and second elected Scholars shall not during the 
first and second year receive a lax^er proportion of the proceeds of the 
bequest than they would have received on the supposition that all the 



A ugmentcUion fund 818 

Scholarships were then filled, and that in the mean time the unap- 
propriated surplus of the four fifths of the proceeds he invested, as it 
arises, in the same Stock in which the Benefaction now stands; to he 
applied to the general purposes of the Bequest. 

15. That the accounts of this Bequest shall he kept distinct from Aoooonta. 
the general accoimts of the University and shall he annually audited 

hy the Electors at the election of the Scholars ; and heing so audited 
shall he laid on the Registrar3r's tahle in the Senate House at the next 
Congregation, for the inspection of the Senate. 

16. That these resolutions shall he in force for six years com- Thete Bales 
mencing from Jime 1, 1819 ; when they shall he again submitted to the for six yeua. 
Senate for revision and alteration, if necessary^. 



B. Augmentation Fund, 1862. 

Queens' College Lodge, 
June 4, 1862. 

The Vice-Chancellor begs leave to inform the Members of the 
Senate that he has received from the Rev. Peter Hanmett Mason, M.A., 
Fellow of St John's College, the Treasurer of a Committee of Subscribers 
to a Fund for the Augmentation of Mr Tyrwhitt's Benefaction for the 
Encouragement of Hebrew Learning, a Resolution of the Committee in 
the following terms : 

**The Accounts of the Subscription Fund having been 
examined, it was found that the whole amounted to £400 
Exchequer Bills and £86. 

Agreed, that the above amounts be offered to the Uni- 
versity in Augmentation of the Tyrwhitt's Hebrew Scholar- 
ships Fund." 
The Vice-Chanoellor wishes to state for the information of Members 
of the Senate that in consequence of successive reductions of the 
Interest of the Stock in which Mr Tyrwhitt's Benefaction was invested, 
not more than £135 per annum is now received by the University on 
behalf of the Scholarships, whereas the third of the Regulations de- 
creed by the Senate on the 29th of April, 1836, provides, "that out of 
the net annual proceeds of Mr Tyrwhitt's Benefaction the sum of £1&0 
be divided among the Six Scholars." It was to meet this deficiency in 
the Fund that the Subscription was opened. 

Mr Tyrwhitt's Benefaction, consisting in the first instance of 
£3,600 Navy 5 per Centa and augmented by successive purchases of 
Stock from accumulations of unappropriated Income, is now repre- 

1 Graoe Book M, pp. 251—253. 



814 Crosse Scholarships 

sented by £4,500 New 3 per Gents. The Vice-Chanoellor propoaee to 
inyeet a Cash Balance of £71. 6«. Id, now standing at the credit of this 
Fund in the same Stock on account of the Hebrew Scholarships Fund. 
When the produce of the Subscription Fund, now offered for the 
acceptance of the University, shall have been similarly invested, an 
income will be provided more than sufficient to maintain the Scholar- 
ships at the rate proposed by the Grace of April 29, 1836. 



7. Crosse Scholabships. 
1832. 

The Reverend John Crosse*, B.A. Oxford, 1768, incor- 
porated B.A. at King's College, Cambridge, 1776, M.A. 1776, 
Vicar of Bradford, Yorkshire, 1784-1816, who died 17 June, 
1816, by Will dated 15 June, 1816, bequeathed a portion of 
his personalty to George Buxton Browne of Halifax, 
"earnestly requesting and entreating him to expend the 
same in furthering and promoting the Cause of true 
Religion among the Inhabitants of Qreat Britain and Ireland 
as to him may appear most eligible." 

The settlement of Mr Crosse's estate was delayed for some 
years by legal formalities, and the foundation of Theological 
Scholarships with part of the above Ainds did not come 
formally before the University until 1832; but before that date 
some correspondence had taken place between Mr Browne, 
the Reverend Ch. Musgrave, B.D., sometime Fellow of Trinity 
College, and then Vicar of Halifax, and some persons at 
Cambridge. It may be assumed that Mr Musgrave suggested 
the idea of the Scholarships, if he did not actually draw up 
the scheme subsequently submitted to the Senate'. 

The regulations had been prepared some time before 
they were submitted to the Senate, for in a letter dated 
29 October, 1832, the Vice-Chancellor tells his correspondent 
that "last week the proposals for instituting three theological 
Scholarships in the University were submitted to the Heads 

* DicU of Nat. Biogr. Vol. liii. p. 224. 

* This ftoooQnt is based upon a oorrespondenoe between Ch. Shearman, Esq. 
of Gray's Inn, Solicitor to the executors of Mr Orosse, and the Yioe-Chanoellor, 
Aognst — ^NoYember, 1832, preaeryed in the BegUtzy, Vol. xzzviii. 28. 



liegvlatians 815 

of Colleges then in residence for their consideration*"; and 
he did not inform the Senate that £2000, free of legacy duty, 
would be transferred to the University " for the purpose of 
founding three Theological Scholarships to be under the 
following regulations," until 30 November, 1832. 



Megviations for the Crosse Scholarships. 

1. That they be called ''The Croese Scholarships." Name. 

2. That the candidates for the same be Bachelors of Arts, in the 

first year from their degree ; and that such Scholarships be tenable till Tennre. 
the Scholars attain the standing of Masters of Arts, viz. for three years. 

3. That the first elections be so arranged as to make one of them Elections 
vacant yearly for ever ; and for this purpose, that at the first election ukeplace. 
the persons elected be a Junior, a Middle and a Senior Bachelor. 

4. That the annual examination and election take place in the 
Michaelmas Term after the division of the said Term. 

5. That in case of any vacancy of a Scholarship before the person Case of an 
is of Master of Arts standing, that at the next annual election a va^^^^ 
Bachelor of Arts of the same year with the Scholar so vacating be 

elected into his room. 

6. That the sum of £2000 proposed to be transferred to the interest of 
University be vested in Qovemment Securities, in the name of the be%vided 
Chancellor, Masters and Scholars, the annual interest arising from the SSb^m. 
same to be divided equally among the three Scholars. 

7. The electors to be the Vice-Chancellor, the Margaret Professor Electors, 
of Divinity, the Regius Professor of Divinity, the Begius Professor of 
Hebrew, the Regius Professor of Greek, the Norrisian Professor of 
Divinity, and the Professor of Arabic. 

8. The examination to turn upon a knowledge of the Holy Subjecta 
Scriptures in their original tongues, Hebrew and Qreek, of Ecclesiastical 
History, of the earlier and later Heresies, and such other subjects of 
useful inquiry as may be thought most likely to assist in the formation 

of valuable characters, fitted to sustain and adorn "the cause of true 
religion*." 

The gift was accepted, and the regulations approved, by 
the following Grace, which passed the Senate 4 December, 
1832. It throws the responsibility for the regulations upon 
Mr Browne : 

Cum Qeorgius Buxton Browne Armiger (ex nummis a Viro 
Reverendo Joanne Crosse ad veram Religionem promovendam ei in 
1 To Mr Shearman, Registry, Vol. xxxviii. 23. 6. 
* Grace Book N, p. 898. 



816 



Crosse Scholarships 



fide legatis), duo millia librarum Universitati Cantabrigiemii obtulerit, 
eft lege ut tres exhibitiones Scholarium in re Theologicft, oertis ab illo 
enunciatis conditionibua, iustituantur et fiindentur : 

Placeat Vobis ut surama pnedicta, in rem propositam et conditioni- 
bus enunciatis, a vobis accipiatur^. 

A deed of trust (A) dated 14 August, 1833, was executed 
between Mr Browne, as executor to Mr Crosse, and the 
University, with the approval of the Court of Chancery. It 
was sealed on the same day'. 

A statute for these Scholarships was confirmed by the 
Senate 3 December, 1857, and approved by the Queen in 
Council 6 April, 1858*. A new statute was approved by the 
Queen in Council 8 February, 1895*. 

New regulations were framed by the electors 5 February, 
1897, and the report containing them was confirmed by the 
Senate 25 February, 1897 ». 



UAQgiist, 
1833. 



TMUtor*! 

wm,i5 

June, 181& 



His 
intentionai 



HiB death. 
Will prayed. 



A. Deed of trust, dated 14 August, 1833. 

This Indenture [made August 14, 1833], between George Buxton 
Browne, of Saville Row in the parish of Halifax in the county of York, 
Esquire (sole executor of the last Will and Testament of the Rev. John 
Crosse, late Vicar of Bradford...) of the one part, and the Chancellor, 
Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge, of the other part. 

Whereas the same John Crosse duly made and published his last 
Will and Testament in writing bearing date [15 June, 1816] and 
thereby after leaving various legacies as therein mentioned, he gave 
and bequeathed the remainder of his personal property... unto the said 
Qeorge Buxton Browne, earnestly requesting and entreating him to 
expend the same in furthering and promoting the cause of true religion 
among the inhabitants of Qreat Britain and Ireland as to him might 
appear most eligible.... 

And whereas the said Testator departed this life in or about the 
month of June [1816] without revoking or altering his said Will and 
shortly after his decease the same was duly proved by the said Qeorge 
Buxton Browne in the prerogative court of the Archbishop of Canterbury 



1 Grace Book N, p. 899. 

> The <* Sealing Book'' records the fact that the University Seal was 
affixed, but the sealing was not aathorised by Graoe. 

s Statutet, ed. 1882, p. 121. « Ibid. ed. 1896, p. 72. 

s Reporter, 9 Februaiy, 1897, p. 496. Ordinaneet, ed. 1901, p. 549. 



Begulations 317 



And whereas a suit was instituted in the High Court of Chancery Decree of 
for the administration of the estate of the said Testator John Crosse, chanmrT 
wherein the said George Buxton Browne was plaintiff, and His Majesty's lasL^^ 
Attorney Qeneral defendant and by a decretal order of the stud Court 
made in the said Cause... and bearing date [11 March 1822] it was 
(amongst other things) declared that so much of the residue of the said 
Testator's estate as was placed out on or arose from mortgages belonged 
to His Majesty, and that the residue thereof only was well given to 
charitable uses ; and it was ordered that the Master to whom the said 
Cause stood referred should ascertain what part of such personal estate 
belonged to His Majesty and what part to charitable uses ; and it was 
(amongst other things) further ordered that the said Master should 
approve of a scheme for the distribution of the produce of the fund he 
should find to be well given to charitable uses and to state his opinion 
thereon to the Court 

And whereas Mr Wingfield the Master to whom the said Cause then Beport of 
stood referred by his separate Report bearing date [23 February, 1832] ssVelx 1832. 
certified that for the reasons therein stated he was of opinion that a 
partial apportionment of the two funds in question might be safely 
made without prejudice to the right or interest of any persons whatso- 
ever ; . . .and that [£1 1,088. 1 7*. 9d.], . .belonged to charitable uses. . .and the *\^,^ 
said Master thereby certified that he was of opinion that [£10,000. Oe. Od, appUed to 
Bank 3 p.c. annuities] part of the said [£11,088. 17«. 9d.] life annuities Saj!****^ 
belonging to charitable uses might safely be then applied to the charit- 
able purposes mentioned in the said Testator's Will, but that he 
had forebome to approve of any scheme for the distribution thereof 
until the directions of the Court should be given on that his 
Report 

And whereas by an order made in the said cause by His Honour Order of 
the yice-Chancellor upon the petition of the said Plaintiff and bearing is June. 183S 
date [15 June 1832] it was ordered that the said Master's said separate ^vereport. 
Report bearing date [23 February last] should be confirmed... and that 
the said sum [£11,088. I7s. Qd."] should be carried over to an Account 
to be entitled The Charity Fund And... it was further ordered that 
the said Master should be at liberty to proceed to the approbation of a 
proper Scheme for the distribution of the said sum of [£10,000] part 
of the said Charity Fund.... 

And whereas the said Master by his report bearing date [1 1 December Scheme for 
1832]... certified that he had... proceeded to consider of a proper charity ^' 

scheme for the said bequest, and that upon due consideration of the 
statement and proposal laid before him by the said plaintiff which 
ultimately he the said Master had settled in the manner and form set 
forth in the schedule to his said Report... he was of opinion that the 
said [£10,000] should be sold and that out of the money to be produced 
by such sale all the several sums in his said Report mentioned should 
be applied in manner thereby directed and (inter alia) that the sum 



318 



Crosse Scholarships 



£S000tobe 
applied to 
foand (brae 
Theological 
BchoUr- 
■hiiM. 

The£2000to 
be free of 
lega<7 duty. 
Bcholanhipe 
to be called 
after 
MrCrooBe. 



These pro- 
posals and 
Kgulations 
haying been 

S proved by 
e Senate, 



Consols to 
be bought 
with the 
£3000 



and trans- 
ferred to the 
Chancellor 
etc. of the 
Univenlly. 



This Inden- 
ture has 
been ap- 

8 roved by 
^e Master. 



of [£2,000] part thereof should be applied to found three Theological 
Scholarships at the University of Cambridge, and that such sum of 
[£2,000] should be clear of legacy duty, and the said proposal or scheme 
BO approved by the said Master and set forth in the said schedule to 
his said Report... was as follows, that is to say, That the said sum of 
[£2,000] clear of legacy duty should be appropriated to found three 
Theological Scholarships at the University of Cambridge, and as a just 
tribute of respect and gratitude to the memory of the said Testator 
that the same should be called after him and be made subject to the 
following regulations ^ . . . 

And whereas by another order of the said Court... bearing date 
[21 December 1832] the said lastly recited Report was confirmed 
absolutely, and by a certain resolution of the Senate of the said 
University passed... [4 December 1832] it was unanimously resolved 
that the proposals... for founding the said three Scholarships at the 
said University should be accepted, and that the aforesaid Rules and 
Regulations for the government of the same should also be approved... 

And whereas by another order bearing date [11 February 1833] 
made in the said cause by the Right Honourable the Master of the 
Rolls... it was ordered that. . .[£2,000] should be carried over to an 
Account to be entitled "The Cambridge Theological Scholarship Fund" 
and... should be laid out in the purchase of Bank 3 p.c. annuities... and 
it was further ordered that it should be referred to the said Master 
to settle a proper Trust Deed or Declaration of the Trusts of such last 
mentioned Fund to be executed by the Chancellor Masters and Scholars 
of the University of Cambridge by their corporate seal for the due 
government and regulation of the Scholarships... and upon execution of 
the said Trust Deed to be certified by the said Master it was further 
ordered that the Bank annuities to be purchased with the said sum of 
[£2,000] together with any interest or dividends to accrue due thereon 
in the meantime and until the transfer thereof should be transferred 
and paid to the said Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the University 
of Cambridge.... 

And whereas., the said sum of [£2,000]... was thereupon laid out in 
the purchase of [£2269. 10«. Id, Bank 3 p.c. consolidated annuities]... and 
the same stock together with [£34. 0<. lOof.] for half a year's dividends 
accrued due thereon on [5 July 1833] is still standing to the credit 
of the said Account in the books of the said Accoimtant Ceneral.... 

And whereas the said Master by his Report bearing date [13 August 
1833] did certify that he had... approved of... this preseut Indenture, 
and he further certified that in testimony of his approbation thereof he 
had signed his allowance in the margin of the last skin of the said 
Indenture, and his name in the margin of the preceding skins of the 
same Indenture, which said Indenture was to be executed by the said 

* The regulations in the deed are the same as those sanctioned by the 
Senate, and printed above, p. 315. 



Thomas Barnes Scholarship 319 

Qeorge Buxton Browne and by the Chanoellor Masters and Scholars of 
the University of Cambridge by their Corporate Seal... 

Now this Indenture witnesseth, and it is hereby declared and ^i^?J. 
agreed... that they the said Chancellor Masters and Scholars and their is the pro- 
successors shall and will stand and be possessed of the said sum of Universiu 
[£2269. 10». Id.].. .Upon and for the several trusts interests and «i»"*™^ 
purposes hereinafter expressed (that is to say) Upon Trust and to the 
intent that there may be established for ever... Three Theological 
Scholarships to be called ''The Crosse Scholarships "...[under the regu- 
lations above recited] And upon further trust that the said Chancellor 
[etc.] shall from time to time receive the dividends... due on the said 
stock... and pay and divide [them] between such three scholars in equal 
shares and proportions for their respective use and benefit absolutely. 

Provided always... that it shall be lawful for the said Chancellor iDTestmenta 
Masters and Scholars and their successors if and when occasion shall yaried. 
require or they shall think fit to call in and sell the said stock or sum 
of [£2269. lOs. Id,] and to invest the monies to arise therefrom in their 
names in or upon any other of the Parliamentary stocks or Fimds or 
government securities and also in like manner to vary and transpose 
such new or other Parliamentary stocks or Funds or government 
securities. 

And that all such new stocks Funds and securities and the dividends New inTeat- 
interest and annual income to arise therefrom shall be held received subject to 
and applied by the said Chancellor [etc.] upon and for such and the truSs.' 
same or the like Trusts intents and purposes as are hereinbefore declared 
of and concerning the said stock or sum of [£2269. 10«. Id,] bank 3 p.c. 
consolidated annuities. 

In witness whereof the said parties to these presents have hereunto 
set their hands and seals the day and year first above written^. 



8. Thomas Barnes Scholarship. 
1844. 

In 1844 John Bames, of the ]tf iddle Temple, oflFered to 
place £2000 3 p.c. consols in the names of certain trustees, 
upon trust, that during the life of his sister Anne Bames, 
the annual income thereof might be applied to her use, and 
that after her death the capital might be transferred to the 
University, upon trust, for the foundation of a Scholarship, 
to be called "The Thomas Bames Scholarship," in memory 
of his brother Thomas Bames. 

Mr Thomas Bames had been educated at Christ's 
1 Begistiy of the University, Box G, No. 22. 



320 Thomas Barnes Scholarship 

Hospital, and at Pembroke College (B.A. 1808, M.A. 1811). 
In 1817 he became editor of The Times newspaper, a post 
which he held till his death, 7 May, 1841 ^ 

The Vice-Chancellor issued a notice of the proposed 
Scholarship, with Regulations (A) 1 February, 1844. The 
offer was accepted by the following Grace, 7 February, 1844: 

Placeat Vobis accipere Exhibitionem legibus modo recitatis fiindan- 
dam, et nomine Thomse Barnes designandam'. 

The deed of trust (B) is dated 19 February, 1844; but 
there is no evidence to shew that the University seal was 
ever affixed to it. 

Miss Barnes died in 1862, but the transfer of the stock 
was delayed, and the first Scholar was not elected till 
5 April, 1867. 

In the Michaelmas term of that year the Council of the 
Senate issued a report (C) dated 24 October, in which they 
recommend an application to the Court of Chancery for leave 
to make certain changes in the regulations. This report was 
confirmed by Grace 31 October, 1867*, and the petition to 
the Lord Chancellor was directed to be sealed 6 February, 
1868*. The Older of the Court (D), assenting to the 
proposed changes, is dated 29 February, 1868. 

In 1886 it was decided (Grace 11 March) that the 
examiners for this Scholarship should be those appointed 
to examine for the Bell Scholarships'. 

A. Regulations, accepted by Grace, 7 FAruary, 1844. 

Election of 1. That the first election of a Scholar on this foundation shall 

take place as soon as conveniently may be after the decease of the said 
Anne Barnes, and all subsequent elections as soon as conveniently 
may be after the Scholarship shall have become vacant. 

Slacfcon. 2. That the Vice- Chancellor, the Regius Professor of Divinity, the 

Regius Professor of the Civil Law, the Lucasian Professor of Mathe- 
matics, and the Public Orator, each for the time being, or their respec- 
tive deputies to be appointed by Grace of the Senate, shall elect the 

^ These facts have been derived from the Yice-Chaneellor's notice, and 
from the Diet, of Nat. Biogr. Vol. iii. p. 267. 

> Grace Book H, p. 850. * Grace Book Z, pp. 241, 260. 

« Ibid. p. 811. > See above, pp. 301, 802. 



Regulatians and Deed of tnut 321 

Scholars on this foundatioo, in sach manner as they shall determine 
upon; but that in all such elections they shall govern themadTes 
conscientiously by the following rule : In ku digendU proBcipma ratio Proving 
temper habeatur ingenii^ doetrimoe^ wirtutu^ et inopia; mt fwo wta^ 
quisque ex etigencUyrum numero his rebus anteoeilat, eo magis^ tU tequmm 
est, prceferatur. 

3. That the candidates for the Scholarship shall be undergraduates wbo oMijba 
in their first year, that is to say, undergraduates who shall have been ^*'**'^*^****' 
admitted between the end of the then last preceding Easter Term, and 

the end of the then last preceding Easter Term but one; and that this 
further qualification shall be requisite, viz., that the candidates shall 
have been educated on the Foundation of Christ's Hospital, St Paul's 
School, or the Merchant Tailors' School, in the city of London, and 
shall have come to the University directly from one of those Schools ; 
but that if in any case there be found no candidate so circumstanced, 
who in the opinion of the electors is fit to be elected, then the said 
Scholarship for that turn only shall be thrown open to all the under- 
graduates of the University, who are, according to the terms above 
specified, in their first year. 

4. That every Scholar elected on this Foundation shall promise in Deeiaxation 
writing to take a Degree in the most regular manner, by performing the by Schohur 
exercises and undergoing the examinations appointed by the University 

for that purpose, and in case of such promise being broken, the Scholar- 
ship shall be ipso facto vacant 

5. That the Scholar shall be entitled to the profits of the Scholar- Tenure of 
ship for a period of four years, unless he shall before the expiration of 

that period die, degrade, go out in a Bye Term, or be rusticated or 
expelled, in either of which cases the Scholarship shall be ipso facto 
vacant. 

6. That the profits of the Scholarship, consisting of the dividends BUpend. 
of the said Bank Annuities, shall be paid to the College Tutor of the 
Scholar for the time being, for the use of such Scholar, as soon as may 

be after the days on which the said dividends become due. 

7. That the said Electors shall be the Auditors of the accounts of Anditon. 
this institution. 

8. That when the Electors meet to elect a Scholar, the business y^^^. 
shall be entered upon by having the Deed of Foundation, as far as it to be nmL 
relates to the Scholarship, read aloud by one of the Electors to 

the rest 



B. Deed of Trust, diiUd 19 February, 1844. 

This Indenture ma^Ui Um lUih day ttf February in the year of our i* Feb. 1M4. 
Lord [1844] between Johu lU^tutm t/f i^ut HtMiitfiy of the Middle Temple 
in the City oi Lond//fi ¥^{n\m ^4 iSm mm [mri arid George William 

c. 21 



822 



Thomas Barnes Scholarship 



BchohtfBhip 

tobe 

founded. 



OapttaL 



After the 
deathofMlM 
Barnes to be 
truisf erred 
toCban- 
oellor (eta) 
of Unlver- 
Bitj for the 
purpose 
of abore 
SohoUxBhip. 



Snt^ectto 
following 
roles. 



Ledger of Dover in the county of Kent Esquire and Edward Cheeter of 
Staple Inn in the county of Middlesex Esquire (Trustees named and 
appointed for the purposes hereinafter expressed) of the other part 

Whereas the said John Barnes is desirous of making a provision for 
his sister Anne Barnes residing at the Mansion House Hanley Road 
near Homsey in the County of Middlesex Spinster during her life and 
of founding from and after her decease a Scholarship for the benefit of 
a certain class of undergraduates of the University of Cambridge to be 
called The Thomas Barnes Scholarship in memoiy of his Brother 
Thomas Barnes deceased formerly on the Foundation of Christ's 
Hospital and late of Pembroke College in the said University Master 
of Arts and of the Inner Temple in the city of London 

And whereas in order to effectuate his said desire the said John 
Barnes has previously to the execution of these presents caused the 
sum of [£2000] £3 per centum Consolidated Bank Annuities to be 
transferred into the joint names of the said Qeorge William Ledger 
and ^ward Chester in the Books of the Qovemor and Company of 
the Bank of England as they the said George William Ledger and 
Edward Chester do hereby admit and acknowledge to be held by them 
upon the trusts and with under and subject to the powers and provisoes 
hereinafter declared and expressed of and concerning the same 

Now this Indenture Witneeseth that...^ as soon as conveniently 
may be after the cesser or determination of the trusts hereinbefore 
declared in favour of the said Anne Barnes and her executors or ad- 
ministrators and of the said Qeorge William Ledger and Edward 
Chester and the survivor of them his executors administrators and 
assigns the said sum of [£2000] £3 per centum Consolidated Bank 
Annuities or so much thereof as shall remain subject to the Trusts of 
these presents shall be transferred in the Books of the Qovemor and 
Company of the Bank of England to the Chancellor Masters and 
Scholars of the University of Cambridge and shall be held by them 
and their Successors for the purposes of a Scholarship to be called The 
Thomas Barnes Scholarship which he the said John Barnes doth 
hereby declare it to be his intention to create found and establish by 
these presents in and for the said University of Cambridge from and 
after the decease of the said Anne Barnes in memory of his brother the 
said Thomas Barnes deceased 

And the said John Barnes doth hereby also declare that the said 
Bank Annuities and the dividends and annual income thereof and the 
said Scholarship and the benefit thereof and the Elections thereto shall 
be held disposed of conducted and managed pursuant to the Scheme 



^ The olauaes here omitted deal with the income of the fund during the 
life-time of Miss Barnes. The deed is printed in fall in Endowments^ ed. 
1876, p. 166 (4). 



Deed of Trust 323 

Rules and Regulations hereinafter particularly expressed and set forth 
that is to say 

1. The said Chancellor Masters and Scholars and their successors Chuiodtor 
shall be Trustees of the said Bank Annuities and apply the dividends trustees 
thereof to the purposes hereinafter directed and they shall empower 

the same Banking Firm in London to receive the said dividends as 
they empower to receive the dividends of the other Stocks belonging to 
the said University 

2. The said Trustees shall cause the first election of a Scholar on Election of 
this Foundation to take place as soon as conveniently may be after the 
decease of the said Anne Barnes ; and all subsequent Elections to the 

said Scholarship shall take place as soon as conveniently may be after 
the said Scholarship shall become vacant 

3. It is the particular request of the said John Barnes that the Eiecton. 
Yioe-Chancellor, The Regius Professor of Divinity, The Regius Pro- 
fessor of Civil Law, The Lucasian Professor of Mathematics and the 
Public Orator each for the time being will take the trouble of electing 

the Scholars on this foundation in such manner as they shall deter- 
mine upon. And in case of the absence or illness of any of the said 
Electors it is the request of the said John Barnes that a deputy or 
substitute be chosen by a Grace of the Senate. And if it should at any 
time happen that two of the said offices constituting an Elector should 
be held by one and the same person it is the request of the said John 
Barnes that a deputy or substitute for the Elector in respect of the 
office last coming to him may be also appointed by a Grace of the Senate 

4. The ci^didates for the said Scholarship must be under- ^^^JgJ^^ 
graduates in their first Year that is to say Undergraduates who shall 

have been admitted between the end of the then last preceding Easter 
Term and the end of the then last preceding Easter Term but one. 
And this further qualification shall be requisite viz. : That the candi- 
dates shall have been educated on the foundation of Christs Hospital, 
Saint Pauls School, or the Merchant Tailors School respectively in the 
City of London and shall have gone up to the said University directly 
from one of those Seminaries of Learning 

6. No objection shall be made to the admission of a candidate for ^^j^^jJ*!^ 
the said Scholarship on account of his pecuniary means enabling him Eieoton. 
to maintain himself without assistance but in electing the Scholars 
from among the candidates the Electors shall govern themselves con- 
scientiously by the following rule so that the dififerent pecuniary 
circumstances of the candidates as well as their merits shall be allowed 
their due weight and influence in the choice. — Rule — In his digendis 
prcBcipna RcUio semper habeatv/r ingentty doctrines^ virttUis^ et inopiai; 
tU quo magis qutsque ex diffendorum numero his rebiu arUeceUat^ eo 
magiSy ut cdquvm est^ prafer<Uur. 

6. Every Scholar elected on this foundation shall promise to take fi^^Jjffi^ 
a D^;ree in the most regular manner by performing the exercises and bTj^oUr 

21—2 



324 



Thomas Barnes Scholarship 



Tenme of 
SoholMBhipL 



Stipend. 



Diyidends 
of stock. 



When the 

SohoUiBhlp 

maybe 

thiown 

open. 



Auditon. 



undergoing the examinations appointed by the UniveFBitj for that 
purpose which promise shall be written in a book and signed by him. 
And in case such promise shall be broken the Scholarship shall be vpto 
facto vacant 

7. The Scholar for the time being on the Foundation shall be 
entitled to the profits of the said Scholarship for a period of four years 
unless he shall before the expiration of that period die degrade or go 
out in a Bye Term be rusticated or expelled in either of which cases 
the Scholarship shall be ipw facto vacant 

8. The said Trustees shall pay the profits of the said Scholarship 
to the College Tutor of the Scholar for the time being for the use of 
such Scholar and the same shall be considered due half-yearly on the 
fifth day of January and the fifth day of July in each year (being the 
days on which the Dividends on the said Bank Annuities become due) 
and shall be paid as soon after such days as may be. And the first 
Scholar on this Foundation shall be entitled to the profits of the said 
Scholarship from the day on which the second half-yearly dividend 
of the said Bank Annuities next after the decease of the said Anne 
Barnes shall accrue due. And every future Scholar shall be entitled 
to the profits of the said Scholarship from the day on which the 
Scholarship shall last have become vacant (if such day shall be either 
the fifth day of Jauuary or the fifth day of July) but if any other day 
then from the fifth day of January or the fifth day of July which may 
have last past before the said vacancy it being the intention of the 
said John Barnes that in case the said Scholarship should at any time 
and from any cause become vacant in the interval between any two 
half-yearly days of the said profits becoming due the whole of the then 
accruing payment shall be paid to the succeeding Scholar and that the 
last Scholar or his Representatives shall not be entitled to an appor- 
tionment thereof 

9. The profits of the said Scholarship shall consist of the dividends 
of the said Bank Annuities after and subject to the payment thereout 
of the costs charges and expenoes incidental to this Foundation which 
costs charges and expences it is the wish of the said John Barnes shall 
be paid exclusively out of the said dividends in order that the Capital 
of the said Bank Annuities may not be diminished 

10. In case it should happen at any vacancy of the said Scholar- 
ship that no undergraduate circumstanced as hereinbefore is required 
should be found desirous of being or in the estimation or opinion of 
the said electors fit to be elected to fill the said Scholarship Then and 
in such case the said Scholarship shall for that turn only be thrown 
open to all the undergraduates of the said University in the first year 
of their admission that is to say imdergraduates who shall have been 
admitted between the end of the then last preceding Easter Term and 
the end of the then last Easter Term but one 

11. It is the particular request of the sejd John Barnes that the 



Regulations 826 

Electors m&j be appointed Auditors of the Aooounts of the Insti- 
tution 

12. If the Electors shall deem it expedient to print copies of or Deed of 
extracts from this Deed of Foundation to be given to the Heads and iSi^be 
Tutors of the several Collies in the said University as well as to the P"^***^ 
Scholar for the time being they are hereby authorised so to do 

13. When the Electors meet to elect a Scholar the Business shall When to be 
be entered upon by having these presents so far at least as the same 

relate to the said Scholarship read aloud by one of the Electors to the 
rest 

In witness whereof the said parties to these presents have hereunto 
set their hands and seals the day and year first above written ^ 



C. Report of the Council of the Senate, dated 
24 October, 1867. 

The Barnes Scholarship was accepted by the Senate 7 February, 
1844; but the endowment, being a reversion after a life interest, did 
not take effect until last year^, when, for the first time, a Scholar was 
elected. 

The Regulations (which were laid before the Senate 1 February, 
1844, and republished 3 December, 1866) are almost precisely the same 
as those originaUy framed for the Bell Scholarships. 

By Regulation 3 of the Barnes Scholarship it is provided ; 

"That the Candidates for the Scholarship shall be under- 
graduates in their first year, that is to say, undergraduates who 
shall have been admitted between the end of the then last pre- 
ceding Easter Term, and the end of the then last preceding 
Easter Term but ona" 

In consequence of the alterations in the Statutes of the Uni- 
versity the clauses in the above Regtdation are in many cases 
contradictory. 

It seems to the Council desirable that instead of the Regulation 
above mentioned, the following Regulation, similar to that now in force 
for the Bell Scholarships, be substituted, viz. : 

"That the Candidates for the Barnes Scholarship shall be 
undergraduates in their first year; and that undergraduates 
shall be deemed to be in their first year, if of not more than one 
year's standing from the time of their first residence.'' 

It seems also desirable that the following Regulation with regard to 

1 Begifltry of the UniTerrity, Box O, No. 28. 
* The words should be " this year." 



326 Wctddington Scholarship 

the Electors, taken from the Statute for the Bell Scholarships, should 
he added to those for the Barnes Scholarship ; viz. 

"That the University shall have power to alter and deter- 
mine from time to time, by Grace of the Senate, the Regulations 
respecting the persons who are to examine the Candidates and 
elect the Scholars.'' 
The Council recommend that an application be made to the Court 
of Chancery for these purposes. 



D. Order of the Court of Chancery, dated 
29 February, 1868. 

Upon the Petition of The Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the 
University of Cambridge and of The Reverend James Cartmell D.D. 
Master of Christ's College and Henry Wilkinson Cookson D.D. Master 
of Saint Peter's College in the same University on the 2l8t February 
1868 preferred unto The Right Honourable the Lord High Chancellor 
of Great Britain and upon hearing Counsel for the Petitioners and upon 
reading the said Petition which has been subscribed by the Petitioners 
Henry Wilkinson Cookson and James CartmeU and to which the Com- 
mon Seal of the said University of Cambridge has been affixed This 
Court doth Order that the Senate of the University of Cambridge be at 
liberty to insert in the regulations upon which the future elections of 
Scholars upon the foundation of John Barnes in the Petition named 
are to be conducted in lieu of the fourth regulation contained in the 
Indenture of the 19th February 1844 in the Petition mentioned a regu- 
lation corresponding with the third clause of the additional Statute 
respecting the Bell Scholarship in the Petition mentioned and to make 
a similar alteration in the tenth regulation contained in the said In- 
denture so far as it relates to the qualification of the undergraduates 
to whom the said Scholarship is in the events therein mentioned to be 
thrown open and also to insert in lieu of the third regulation in the 
said Indenture contained a regulation corresponding with Clause (one) 
of the said Additional Statute ^ 



9. Waddington Scholarship. 
1870. 

In 1870 (24 February) the Council of the Senate informed 

the University that Miss Anne Waddington and Mias Clara 

Waddington proposed to transfer to the University a sum 

of £3000 in three per cent, consolidated Bank Annuities for 

> The original is in the Begistiy, Vol. xzxyiii. 6, 7. 



Deed of foundation 327 

the purpose of founding a Classical Scholarship in the 
University, to be called the Waddington Scholarship, in 
memory of their brothers, the late Very Reverend George 
Waddington, D.D., Dean of Durham, formerly Davies 
University Scholar, and the late Right Honourable Horatio 
Waddington, M.A., formerly Pitt University Scholar; and 
that regulations for the Scholarship (embodied in the Deed 
of Trust printed below), had been suggested, and had received 
the sanction of the Misses Waddington. 

The deed of foundation, embod3dng the regulations, and 
the letter of the Public Orator, thanking the Misses Wad- 
dington for their munificent benefaction, were ordered to be 
sealed 31 March, 1870^ The first Scholar was elected in 1871. 

Deed of Foundation, dated 26 March, 1870. 

This Indenture made the twenty-sixth day of March one thousand 26 March, 
eight hundred and seventy between Anne Waddington and Clara 
Waddington both of 39 York Place Portman Square in the County of 
Middlesex Spinsters of the one part and the Chancellor Masters and 
Scholars of the University of Cambridge of the other part 

Whereas after the death of the Very Reverend George Waddington The Wad- 
Doctor of Divinity and Dean of Durham and of the Right Honourable ScSoU^p 
Horatio Waddington late Under Secretary of State for the Home founded. 
Department the said Anne Waddington and Clara Waddington proposed 
to present to the University of Cambridge a fund for the purpose of 
founding a Classical Scholarship in the University to be called The 
Waddington Scholarship as a memorial of the virtues and distinction 
of their late brothers the said Qeorge Waddington and Horatio 
Waddington and to be so specified in the deed of gift to the University 
and in the Cambridge University Calendar 

And whereas the fund so as aforesaid proposed to be presented to ^^^sow 
the University for the before mentioned purpose consists of the simi 
of Three thousand pounds three per cent, consolidated Bank Annuities 

And whereas the said Anne Waddington and Clara Waddington g^^^^ 
have ofiered to transfer the said fund to the said Chancellor Masters *o.f *>»»- 
and Scholars upon the terms and subject to the conditions contained on certain 
in the r^ulations for the said Scholarship set forth in the Schedule 
hereto and the said Chancellor Masters and Scholars have agreed to 
accept such offer 

Now this Indenture witnesseth and it is hereby agreed and declared 
that so soon as conveniently may be after the execution of these presents 
1 Grace Book T, pp. 54--69. 



oondltlont. 



828 



Waddington Scholarship 



the said Anne Waddington and Clara Waddington shall transfer to the 
said Chancellor Masters and Scholars the said sum of Three thousand 
pounds three per cent consolidated Bank Annuities and that the said 
Chancellor Masters and Scholars shall at all times hereafter stand 
possessed of the said Three thousand pounds three per cent consoli- 
dated Bank Annuities upon the trusts and subject to the terms and 
conditions contained in the regulations set forth in the Schedule hereto 
In witness whereof the said Anne Waddington and Clara Waddington 
have hereunto set their respective hands and seals and the said 
Chancellor Masters and Scholars have caused their common seal to be 
hereunto affixed the day and year first above written. 



Kunoof 
8cfaol«nhipw 



Btipond. 



Who we 
eligible. 



Tenwe. 



Notice of 

▼MU1C7. 

Subjeet of 



When to 
begin. 

Names to be 
■enttoVioe- 



by tuton. 

PlOTiM. 



Beddenoeof 
Seholftr. 



The Schedtde above referred to, 

1. When and so soon as the proposed sum of Three thousand 
poimds three per cent, consolidated Bank Annuities shall have been 
transferred to the Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the University 
of Cambridge there shall be established in the University a Scholarship 
to be called The Waddington Scholarship, 

2. The Scholar shall receive by way of stipend the whole of the 
annual dividends and income of the above named sum subject to the 
payment thereout of necessary expenses if any. 

3. Any undergraduate of not more than three years' standing from 
the time of his first residence shall be eligible for this Scholarship. 

4. The electors shall be the Yioe-Chanoellor the Public Orator the 
Begins Professor of Greek ^ and two members of the Senate appointed 
by Grace of the Senate at the last Congregation in November after the 
vacancy has been declared, provided that in case any of the ex-officio 
electors be prevented from taking part in the examination a deputy 
shall be appointed in each case by Grace of the Senate. 

6. The Scholarship shall be tenable for five years if the Scholar 
shall continue a member of the University. 

6. The Vice-Chancellor shall declare the vacancy of the Scholar- 
ship from time to time as occasion shall require. 

7. The examination for the Scholarship shall be exclusively 
Classical. 

8. The examination shall begin on the Monday after the last 
Saturday but one in the January following the declaration of vacancy. 

9. The names of the candidates for the vacant Scholarship shall be 
made known to the Vice-Chancellor by their respective Tutors not later 
than Monday next before the commencement of the examination. 

10. This Scholarship shall not be tenable with a Craven Scholar- 
ship nor with the Battle, Browne, Davies^ Pitt or Person Scholarship. 

11. The University shall have power to regulate from time to time 
by Grace of the Senate the conditions of residence of the Scholar, and 

1 The Professor of Latin was added to the Electors by Giaoe, 4 Deo. 1872. 



Idghtfoot Scholarships 829 

if any Scholar hSL to comply with such conditions the ex-officio electors 
shall be at liberty to declare the Scholarship vacant. 

12. The University shall have power to alter and determine from Power to 
time to time by Grace of the Senate the regulations respecting the utioS.'"^ 
pereons who are to examine the candidates and elect the Scholars and 
also the r^ulations respecting notice of the vacancy of the Scholarship, 
the academical standing of candidates, the notice to be given by 
candidates of their intention to present themselves for examination, 
the time, mode, and subjects of examination (provided the subjects 
be exclusively classical) the time of election and the duration of the 
tenured 

10. LiGHTFOOT Scholarships. 
1870. 

These Scholarships were offered to the University in 
1870 by the Reverend Joseph Barber Lightfoot, D.D., 
B.A. 1851; M.A. 1854; D.D. 1864; sometime Fellow of 
Trinity College; Hulsean Professor of Divinity 1861-75; 
Bishop of Durham 1879-90. The offer was accompanied by 

the following letter : 

Trinity Collbge, 

October 26, 1870. 

Drab Mr Yigb-Chancellob, 

May I trouble you to lay the accompanying scheme before the 
Council, in order that, if approved, it may be submitted to the Senate 
for acceptance. 

The scheme has not been drawn up hastily or without consultation : 
but it is probable that I have overlooked some points of importance and 
that improvements may be suggested. 

I have long felt that the study of history does not receive proper 
encouragement in this University ; and at the present time, when the 
just demands of Natural Science are so eagerly urged, there is great 
danger that an instrument of education, which I venture to consider 
even more important, may be forgotten. 

With the desire of meeting this want to some extent, I make the 
offer to which the scheme refers. At the same time I have ventured to 
stipulate that especial, though not exclusive, attention shall be paid to 
Ecclesiastical History, not only because my connexion with the 
Theological faculty gives it a direct claim upou me, but also because 
I regard it, when properly treated, as the most important and instructive 
branch of historical study. 

I am, [etc.] 

J. B. LIGHTFOOT. 
^ From the original in the Begistiy of the University, Box O, No. 24. 



880 



Lightfoot Scholarships 



Number. 
How to be 
aarigned. 



Who may 
compete. 



Tenure. 
Stlpendi. 



Stipend not 
aangnedto 
be Added to 
the prin< 
dpeJ. 



Who are to 
examine. 



Appoint* 
ment. 

Salaiy. 

Date of ex- 
amination. 



Sttbjeeta. 



The Council of the Senate thereupon informed the Senate* 
(31 October) that Dr Lightfoot had oflfered to transfer to 
the University a sum of £4500 (viz. £2000 Madras Imgation 
Guaranteed Stock, £1500 East Indian Railway Debentures, 
and £500 Bombay and Baroda Railway Debentures, all 
bearing interest 5 per cent., together with £500 in the 3 per 
cent, consols) for the purpose of founding Scholarships for 
the encouragement of the study of History and more es- 
pecially of Ecclesiastical History, under the conditions 
contained in the following regulations, which it may be 
presumed, were drawn up by Dr Lightfoot himself: 

1. The Scholarships shall be three in number; they shall be 
assigned after examination, and shall be open for competition to all 
members of the University who, having resided at least one year and 
being still in residence or having taken their first degree, are mider 
26 years of age when the examination begins ; but no one, who has 
been elected to one of these Scholarships, shall be allowed to compete 
again. 

2. Each Scholarship shall be tenable for three years. 

3. After the payment of the examiners, as hereinafter directed, 
one-third of the residue of the annual interest arising from the Fund 
shall be paid to each Scholar. 

4. If at any time a Scholarship is not adjudged owing to the want 
of duly qualified candidates, or is vacated by death or resignation or by 
any other cause, the sums which would have been paid to the holder 
shall be invested and added to the principal. 

6. The examination shall be conducted by two examiners to be 
nominated by the Council and appointed by Grace of the Senate. So 
far as is found convenient, one examiner in each year shall be a member 
of the University of Cambridge and the other a member of the University 
of Oxford. 

6. The examiners shall be appointed before the close of the Lent 
Term of the year preceding that in which they are required to examine. 

7. Each examiner shidl receive £15. 

8. The examination shall commence in each year on the second 
Tuesday in the Easter Term. 

9. The examination shall consist of three parts : 

(a) A selected portion of history, of which notice shall have been 
given by the examiners before the division of the Easter 
Term in the preceding year, and which candidates shall be 
required to have studied, as far as possible, from original 

^ Reporter^ 2 November, 1870, p. 58; reissued, with a few alterations, 
28 November, p. 112. 



beaelectod. 



Regulations 831 

8OUIO0B. This portion may consist of & definite period or 
periods, or of a definite transaction or transactions, or of a 
biography or biographies. 
(6) A choice of subjects for Essays, of which the candidates ^ 
shall be required to select one or more, as the examiners 
may direct. 
(c) Questions taken from or suggested by the following books : 
De Broglie, r£glise et FEmpire Romain. 
Bryce, Holy Roman Empire. 
Quizot, Histoire de la Civilisation en Europe. 
„ Histoire de la Civilisation en France. 
Hallam, Europe during the Middle Ages. 

„ Literature of Europe. 
Milman, Latin Christianity. 
Ranke, History of the Popes. 

„ History of the Reformation. 

10. In determining the selected portion of history, and in setting How the 
the subjects for Essays, regard shall he had, as far as possible, to the EStory ia to 
special object of the foundation, which is the encouragement of the 
study of Ecclesiastical History in itself and in connexion with General 
History ; and the range of choice in both cases shall be limited to the 

period between the accession of Marcus Aurelius (a.d. 161) and the 
Fall of the Holy Roman Empire (a.d. 1806). 

11. If the examiners are unable to agree between two candidates, i^Bxun^en 
their papers shall be submitted to the Professor of Modem History, 
who shall award the Scholarship to one or other, or divide it between 
the two, at his discretion. 

12. Besides the name of the successful candidate, the examiners cImsUbL 
shall likewise publish the names of those who have acquitted them- 
selves in the examination so as to deserve honourable mention. 

13. The first examination for one of the Scholarships shall be held ima or flxtt 
in the Easter Term, 1873 : and one Scholarship shall be offered for qnent ex- 
competition in the same term in each succeeding year. The interest, ^ ^' 
which shall accrue from time to time before this scheme comes into 

full operation, shall be invested and added to the principal. 

14. The list of books mentioned in the 9th regulation may be Liator 
revised from time to time by agreement between the Hulsean Professor u^iSvSH 
of Divinity and the Professor of Modem History for the time being ; 

but any change on which they may agree shall be submitted to the 
Yice-Chanoellor and shall not take effi^ct without bis consent. 

15. The Senate shall have power from time to time to make such fieguUtiooe 
changes in the above reguUtii/iM as may appear desirable; provided ^SSnS, 
always that the object of tkte foundation as mentioned in the preamble be 
strictly respected, and [mtviddd likewiiie that no change be made during 

the lifetime of the fuuxider without his consent 



do not agree. 



332 



Abbotfs Scholarships 



This report was confirmed 24 November, 1870 ; and the 
letter of thanks, written by the Public Orator, was ordered 
to be sealed 8 December. The regulations as then confirmed, 
•remained in force until 1896, when a change in Regulations 
(11) and (14) was proposed by the Council of the Senate 
(7 December)^ and accepted by the Senate 11 February, 
1897. 



11. Abbott's Scholarships. 
1871. 



£10.000 
bequeathed 
to certain 
trustees 



for the 
foundation 
of Scholar- 
ships at 
Oxford and 
Cambridge. 



£9000 to be 
aUottedto 
each. 



Who may 
hold the 
Scholar- 
ships. 



These Scholarships were founded in accordance with the 
Will of Mr John Abbott, a retired merchant of Halifax, who 
died 13 May, 1870. His Will is dated 19 February, 1867. 

The following extract concerns the Scholarships : 

...I give and bequeath to Sir Francis Crossley Baronet of Somer- 
leyton in the County of Suffolk and of Belle Yue in the parish of 
Halifax aforesaid Henry Wright of Warley in the parish of Halifax 
aforesaid Qentleman William Lawrence Bowerbank of Ashgrove in' 
Southowram in the said parish of Halifax Woolstapler and John 
Whiteley Ward of South Royd in Skircoat in the said parish of Halifax 
Esquire the sum of Ten thousand pounds sterling 

Upon trust that they or the survivors or survivor of them or the 
executors administrators or assigns of such survivor or other the 
Trustees or Trustee for the time being of this my Will do and shall 
immediately after my decease pay and apply the same in the founding 
of three Scholarships at the University of Oxford and two Scholarships 
at the University of Cambridge the same to be given to the Universities 
respectively or to any particular College or Colleges therein respectively 
at the absolute discretion of my said Trustees or Trustee for the time 
being 

and it is my wish that the sum of Two thousand pounds shall be 
applicable to each Scholarship and that each sum of Two thousand 
pounds shall be invested by the proper parties in the said Universities 
or Colleges to which the same Scholarships shall be given in the Three 
per cent, consolidated Bank Annuities 

It is my wish that the said Scholarships shall be given to imder- 
graduates who have not kept more than three terms at the University 
or College to which they shall be respectively given and that no one 
shall hold one for more than three years from his appointment and it 



1 Reporter, 8 December, 1896, p. 806. Ordinaneet, ed. 1901, p. 569. 



Ahhotts Scholarships 333 

is my wish in founding the said Scholarships to give encouragement to 
learning and to assist Clergymen of the Church of England in sending Help tp the 
their sous to the Universities whose circumstances are such as not to 
enahle them to hear the whole of that expense as well as to assist 
Orphans of Clergymen under similar circumstances in ohtainiug the 
benefit of an University education 

And in the appointment of Scholars I should other things being S^S^ 
equal wish that candidates bom in the West Riding of the County of of Yorka. to 
York should have the preference 

I should also wish the said Scholarships to be called Abbott's 
Scholarships^. 

After Mr Abbott's death his executors consulted the Ven. 
Charles Musgrave, D.D., Vicar of Halifax, and Archdeacon of 
Craven, who had known the testator. Mr Musgrave com- 
municated the bequest to the Vice-Chancellor, and after some 
correspondence he approved, and induced the executors to 
approve, a suggestion that as the object of Mr Abbott was 
the same as that of Mr Bell, the regulations for his Scholar- 
ships should be framed in as close accordance as possible 
with the regulations for the Bell Scholarships. The executors 
further stated (10 November, 1870) that if this or some 
similar scheme should be finally approved they would "be 
prepared to hand over the £4000 firee from all expenses and 
with Interest at 4 per cent, from Mr Abbott's death on the 
13th of May last to the proper authorities of the University 
at any time on or after the 10th of January next." 

The report of the Council of the Senate, dated 80 January, 
1871, containing the regulations (A), and most of the abovo 
particulars, was confirmed by the Senate 9 February, 1871 ; 
and the Vice-Chancellor was authorized, 16 F(jbruary, to 
thank Dr Musgrave and the executors*. 

In 1873 (13 December) a Grace passed the Senate 
authorizing the examiners appointed by the Senate to 
examine for the Bell Scholarships to examine for Abbott's 
Scholarships also*. 

^ From a copy of the WiU in ihe Begiatry of the University, Vol. zxzyiii. 
1; 1.9. 

* Dr MnsgrsYe's letters are in the Begistry, Vol. xxzviil. 1. 2—8. For 
the report of the Cooncil see Reporter, 1 February, 1871, p. 168. 

* Reporter, 9 Deeember, 1873, p. 150. 



384 



Abbotts Scholarships 



Name. 
EleoUns. 



Whomfty 
compete. 



Order of 
prefereDoe. 



Bate of ex- 
amination. 



Tutorato 
■end in 
nameeof 
candidates. 



Stipend of 
Scholars. 



Conditions 
of residenoe. 



NoUoeof 



First and 

sobeeqnent 

elections. 



A. Regulations for Abbott's Scholarships. 

1. As soon as the proposed sum of £4000 shall have been trans- 
ferred to the Chancellor, Masters, and Scholars of the University of 
Cambridge, there shall be established in the University two Scholarships 
to be called the Abbott Scholarships. 

2. The J^ectors to these Scholarships shall be the Vice-chancellor, 
the Regius Professor of Divinity, the Lucasian Professor of Mathe- 
matics, and two Members of the Senate, appointed by Grace of the 
Senate, provided that in case any of the ex officio Electors be prevented 
from taking part in the examination, a deputy shall be appointed in 
each case by Grace of the Senate. 

3. The candidates for these Scholarships shall (except in cases 
hereinafter specified) be undergraduates in their first year, and under- 
graduates shall be deemed to be in their first year, if of not more than 
one year's standing from the time of their first residence. Among such 
candidates, sons or orphans of Cle]*gymen in the Church of England 
who stand in need of assistance to enable them to obtain the benefit 
of an University Education shall be chosen, if there be any in the 
opinion of the Electors sufficiently deserving : if not, sons of laymen 
being undergraduates who stand in need of assistance may be chosen. 
Other things being equal, candidates bom in the West Riding of the 
County of York shall have the preference. 

4 The examination shall commence on the Monday next after the 
second Sunday in Lent. 

5. The names of the candidates for the vacant Scholarships shall be 
made known to the Vice-Chancellor by their respective Tutors not later 
than the Monday next before the commencement of the examination. 

6. Each Scholar when elected in his first year of residence shall be 
entitled to receive one-half of the annual profits of the endowment for a 
period of three years, unless he shall before the expiration of that period 
die, or be rusticated or expelled, in any of which cases the Scholarships 
shall be ipso facto vacant. 

7. The University shall have power to regulate from time to time 
by Grace of the Senate the conditions of residence of the Scholars, and 
if any Scholar fail to comply with such conditions, the ex officio Electors 
shall be at liberty to declare the Scholarship vacant 

8. The Vice-Chanoellor shall make known the vacancies from time 
to time as occasion shall require. 

9. The first Election of two Scholars on this Foundation, one of 
whom shall be entitled to hold the Scholarship for a period of three 
years, and the other for a period of two years only, shall take place as 
soon as conveniently may be after the establishment of the Scholarships, 
and all subsequent Elections shall take place as soon as conveniently 
may be after a Scholarship shall have become vacant 



TBcandoB. 



Stewart of Rannoch SdwlarsMps 886 

10. At the first election to these Scholarships, the Scholar who is 
elected to hold the Scholarship for two years only, shall be chosen from 
among undergraduates in their second year of residence : and if at any 
time a Scholarship shall become vacant before the expiration of the 
term of three years, another Scholar shall, as soon as conveniently may 
be, be chosen for the remainder of the said term from among under- 
graduates of the same year as that of the Scholar whose Scholarship 
has been vacated before the proper time. 

11. Neither of these Scholarships shall be tenable with a Bell 
Scholarship or with the Barnes Scholarship. 

12. The University shall have power to alter and determine from R«fnd»tloiiB 
time to time by Grace of the Senate the regulations concerning the time vMied. 

of the examination, the notice to be given by candidates of their 
intention to ofier themselves, and the persons who are to examine the 
candidates and elect the Scholars ^ 



12. John Stewart of Rannoch Scholarships. 
1884. 

Mr John Stewart of Rannoch, a Scotch gentleman resident 
in Bristol, who died 19 July, 1884, by Will dated 7 March, 
1881, lefb his property (subject to certain charges) to the 
University, to found Scholarships value £25 each, in Hebrew, 
Greek, Latin, and Sacred Music. A letter from Mr Stewart's 
solicitor to the Vice-Chancellor, dated 20 August, 1884, gives 
particulars of the property bequeathed : 

The Executors and Trustees of the Will of our late client, Mr John 
Stewart of this city, acting under Prohate granted to them by the 
Bristol District Registry on the 14th instant, instruct us to send you 
herewith a copy of such will, from which you will please observe that, 
subject to the payments of the various charges and legacies and to the 
provision of the annuity as thereby directed, their Testator devises and 
bequeaths the whole of his residuary Estate to your University for the 
purposes therein mentioned. 

The Estate consists of a freehold farm of about 70 acres at Bishop- 
sutton near Bristol, of some 8 acres of freehold land at Keynsham near 
Bristol, of two freehold shops and warehouses, Nos. 5 and 6, Bridge 
Parade, Bristol, and a freehold cottage at Montpelier, Bristol ; and of 
about £1,200 to £1,300 of personalty. The rental of the freeholds, 
subject to the usual deductions and to groundrents and land tax is 
upwards of £600 a year. No. 5, Bridge Parade, is mortgaged for £900. 

1 Reporter, 1 February, 1871, p. 169. 



336 Stewart of Rannoch Scholarships 

Our clients estimate that about £3,500 will be required to meet the 
charges, &c. provided for by the will ; and they suggest that the best 
method of doing this will be for them to realize the several Bristol 
properties, and, after discharging thereout what has to be paid, to 
transfer the balance of the proceeds to the University along with the 
Title deeds of the unsold ft«eholds ; but in offering this suggestion they 
desire to say that they will be glad to be favoured with the views of the 
University authorities, with which it will be their pleasure to do their 
utmost to comply. 

The following extract from the Will explains the testator's 
intentions so far as the University was concerned : 
Teetator'B ...I devise and bequeath all my real and personal estate whatsoever 

left to the or wheresoever of or to which I shall at my death be seized possessed 
° ^ *^' or entitled or over which I shall at my death have a general power of 
appointment (except what I otherwise dispose of by this my Will or 
any Codicil hereto) unto and to the use of the University of Cambridge 
absolutely subject to and charged with the payment of my debts 
funeral and testamentary expenses and the legacies and annuities 
bequeathed by this my Will or any Codicil hereto and the legacy duty 
thereon 
ScholarahiiN To the intent that such University may found Scholarships of the 
founded annual value of Twenty-five pounds each such Scholarships to be 
Graek, Latin tenable for one year and to be given for proficiency in some or one of 
^ ^^ the following subjects namely in Hebrew Greek Latin and Sacred 
Music or in the discretion of the Governing Body of the said Uni- 
versity to be tenable for three years for proficiency in some or one of 
the prescribed subjects the preference in every case to be given to 
young men natives of the Counties of Wilts Somerset or Gloucester 
including the City and County of Bristol otherwise the above Scholar- 
ships shall be open to all Competitors subject to such restrictions as to 
age as the said University may think fit but such young men are to be 
of good moral character and of sober and industrious habits 
The fond Provided always that if the Governing Body of the said University 

Simred to shall see fit it shfJl be lawful for the said University to allow the fund 
***™°'* **■ derived from my estate to accumulate at interest and upon such invest- 
ments as the said Governing Body may deem fit until the said fund is 
in the opinion of the said Governing Body of the said University suf- 
ficiently large to found scholarships as directed in this my Will 
Eyerr And I hereby direct that each and every Scholarship so founded 

tohear^ ^ shall bear my name and bo called 'The John Stewart' or 'The John 
Stewart of Rannoch ' Scholarship. 

The report of the Council of the Senate, dated 13 October, 
1884^ which contained the above documents, recommended 
> ReporUr, 21 October, 1884, p. 95. 



founder's 



Harkness Scholarships 337 

the acceptance of the bequest This recommendation having 
been confirmed, 6 November, the matter was referred to the 
Financial Board. They recommended, in a report dated 
3 February, 1886^ that no Scholarships should be founded 
until certain sums advanced by the Chest to meet the debts 
of the estate had been replaced; and that, as a mark of 
respect to the memory of the testator, the University should 
imdertake for ever to maintain in repair his tomb and monu- 
ment. This report was confirmed by Grace 26 February, 
1886, and the recommendation respecting the grave and 
monument 25 March, 1886*. 

The financial business of the trust occupied so much time 
that a Sjmdicate to prepare a scheme for the establishment 
of Scholarships as directed by the Will was not appointed 
till 1893 (16 February). They issued a report dated 23 May», 
which, after discussion (8 June), was referred back to the 
Syndicate, as was an "amended report" dated 17 November*, 
which was discussed 23 November. A "second amended 
report," dated 25 November', was confirmed 7 December'; 
and the first election to Scholarships was held in May, 1894. 



13. Habkness Scholarships. 
1885. 

In March, 1880, the Vice-Chancellor was informed that 
Mrs Pearson, of Penrith, was desirous of bequeathing to the 
University, and to the colleges of Newnham and Qirton, 
certain fiinds for the purpose of founding Scholarships in 
Geology (including Paleontology) in memory of her brother, 
Robert Harkness, F.R.S., Professor of Geology in Queen's 
College, Cork, fi-om 1854 to his death 5 October, 1878. 

The Council of the Senate made various suggestions 
respecting the terms of the bequest, which were adopted 
by Mrs Pearson, and embodied in her Will, dated 18 August, 

* RepwrUr, 9 February, 1886, p. 898. 

s n)id. pp. 457, 524. ' Ibid. 80 May, 1898, p. 892. 

« Ibid. 21 Noyember, p. 204. » Ibid. 28 NoTomber, p. 229. 

> The regnlatioDB contained in this report are printed in OrdineoMei^ 
ed. 1901, p. 566. 

c. 22 



388 



Harkness Scholarships 



Portnit. 



In memory 
of Prof. 
Harkness. 



A Harkness 

Scholarship 

inGeolocx 

tobe 

founded for 

Oirton and 

Newnham. 



Regulations 

tobe 

framed 

by the two 

ooUf 

joini 



leges 
itly. 



Appoint- 
ment of 
fresh 
trustees. 



1882. Mrs Pearson died 9 March, 1884'. The portions of 
her Will which relate .to her bequests to the University are 
as follows : 

I direct my Executors to present to the Gkdlery of portraits be- 
longing to the University of Cambridge the picture in oils of my late 
brother*.... 

Whereas in memory of my said late brother Robert Harkness F.R.S. 
and F.Q.S. L. & £. who was Professor of Geology at Queen's College 
Cork I am desirous of encoiuaging and promoting the Rtudy of that 
Science including therein Paleontology 

Now I give and bequeath to Professor Qeoi*ge Downing Liveing of 
Newnham Robert Samuel Wright of No 1 Paper Buildings Temple 
London Esquire Anne Jane Clough Principal of Newnham College and 
the Reverend Coutts Trotter Vice President of Newnham College (as 
Trustees for the Association named Qirton College and for the Associa- 
tion named Newnham College) the sum of One Thousand Two Hundred 
and Fifty Pounds in trust for the foundation of a Scholarship for the 
said two Colleges for proficiency in the said science of Geology including 
therein Palaeontology to be called * The Harkness Scholarship ' and to 
be for that purpose invested in the purchase of Three pounds per 
centum Consolidated Bank Annuities And I hereby declare that 
(subject as hereinafter provided) the said Scholarship shall be open to 
students in Girton College aforesaid and to students in Newnham 
College aforesaid and that the said two Colleges jointly shall have full 
power to frame regulations as to the times of award the age and stand- 
ing of candidates the tests for and mode of ascertaining the proficiency 
of candidates the appointment and remimeration of examiners or 
adjudicators the period and conditions of tenure of the Scholarship and 
generally as to all other matters relating to or affecting the said 
Scholarship and from time to time to alter or vary the same regula- 
tions or any of them as the said two Collies jointly shall think fit 

And I hereby further declare that in case of the death or refusal or 
inability to act of the said Trustees or any of them it shall be lawful 
for the said two Colleges jointly to appoint Trustees or a Trustee in place 
of the Trustees or Trustee so dying or refusing or becoming incapable 
to act and that upon every such appointment the Three pounds per 
Centum Bank Annuities shall be transferred into the names of the 
surviving or continuing Trustees or Trustee (if any) and of the new 
Tnistees or Trustee, but so always that so long as there shall be two 
Trustees in whose names the said Bank Annuities shall be standing it 
shall not be necessary for the said Colleges to make any new appoint- 

^ The letters which passed between her representatives and suocessive 
Yioe-ChaneeUon are in the Registry, Vol. zxxviii. 28. 1—11. 
^ The picture has been placed in the Woodwardian Maseum. 



WiU of Mrs Pearson 339 

ment And I hereby declare that the expenses of and attending the 
appointment of new Trustees and the transfer of the trust fund shall 
be borne by the income of the fund. 

I give and bequeath to the Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the A limiUr 
University of Cambridge the sum of one thousand seven hundred and to te ^ 
fifty pounds and all the residue of my moneys household effects and ^^^/° 
personal estate in trust for the foundation of a Scholarship in the said i^^^^^^. 
University for proficiency in the science of Geology including therein 
Palaeontology to be called ' The Harkness Scholarship ' and to be for 
that purpose invested in the piu*chase of Three pounds per centum 
Consolidated Bank Annuities And I hereby declare that (subject as 
hereinafter provided) the said Scholarship shall be open to Members of 
the said University whether belonging or not belonging to a College 
therein and that the said University shall have full power to frame Univenity 
regulations as to the times of award the age and standing of candidates ^^JoaSc^. 
the tests for and mode of ascertaining the proficiency of candidates the 
appointment and remuneration of examiners or adjudicators the period 
and conditions of tenure of the Scholarship and generally as to all other 
matters relating to or affecting the said Scholarship and from time to 
time to vary or alter the same regulations or any of them as the said 
University shall think fit 

Provided always and I hereby declare that it shall be lawful for the The Schoiw- 
said University of Cambridge and for the said Girton College and anu«dand 
Newnham College to agree to unite the said two Scholarships into a LuoiiT^ 
single Scholarship to be called ' The Harkness Scholarship ' as aforesaid 
to be open (subject as hereinafter provided) to members of the said 
University whether belonging or not belonging to a College therein to 
students of Girton College aforesaid and to students of Newnham 
College aforesaid and in such case the said University and two Colleges 
jointly shall have full power to frame regulations as to the times of 
award the age and standing of candidates the tests for and mode of 
ascertaining the proficiency of candidates the appointment and remu- 
neration of examiners or adjudicators the period and conditions of 
tenure of the Scholarship and generally as to all other matters relating 
to or affecting the said Scholarship and from time to time to alter or 
vary the same regulations or any of them as to the said University and 
Colleges jointly shall seem fit And I further declare that in the case ThefundBin 
aforesaid the Bank Annuities heretofore standing in the names of the be united. 
Trustees for the said two Collies shall be transferred into the name of Sed't^^the 
the Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the said University so that the ^°*^«"**y- 
two sums of Bank Annuities may form a single fund for the purposes 
of the said united Scholarship... 

I direct my Executors to pay the legacy duty and incidental expenses ^^^^7 ^^^7 
chargeable on the said legacies of one thousand seven hundred and by the 
fifty pounds one thousand two hundred and fifty pounds and twenty "**"***^ 
pounds so that the same legacies shall be paid without any deduction. 

22—2 



framed. 



340 Clerk Mdocwdl Scholarship 

The report of the Council of the Senate, dated 27 April, 
1885S which contained the above extract from Mrs Peai-son's 
Will, and recommended acceptance of the bequest, having 
been confirmed by the Senate 11 June, 1885, a Syndicate 
was appointed, 12 November', to fi^me regulations. 

This Syndicate issued a report with regulations 19 No- 
vember, 1886*, but the members were not unanimous, and 
the tone of the discussion in the Arts School (2 December)* 
was adverse. The Syndicate was therefore continued, and 
an "amended report" issued 28 January, 1887*. After cri- 
ticism in the Arts School (3 February)' a "second amended 
report" was issued, 18 February, 1887', which was confirmed 
without opposition, 10 March, 1887®. The first Scholar was 
elected in the same year, 15 June. 



14. Clerk Maxwell Scholarship. 
1890. 

This Scholarship was founded in accordance with the 
Will of Mrs Clerk Maxwell, widow of James Clerk Maxwell, 
M.A., F.R.S., Honorary Fellow and formerly Fellow of 
Trinity College, first Cavendish Professor of Experimental 
Physics (i871-1879), who died 5 November, 1879. The 
Will of Mrs Clerk Maxwell is dated 23 May, 1883. She died 
12 December, 1886; and her intentions were made known 
to the Vice-Chancellor in a letter from her executors dated 
4 January, 1887. An extract fi-om this letter was published 
to the Senate 6 January, 1887*. 

Some time elapsed before the estate of the testatrix 
could be realised, and it was not until 1890 (19 May) that 
the Council of the Senate published a report containing 

1 Reporter, 28 April. 1885, p. 634. ^ Ibid. 17 November, p. 168. 

> Ibid. 23 November, 1886, p. 175. * Ibid. p. 243. 

B Ibid. 1 February, 1887, p. 382. « Ibid. p. 405. 

7 Ibid. 1 March, 1887, p. 473. 

" The regulations, as then agreed to, are printed in Ordinances, ed. 1901, 
p. 562. 

» Reporter, 11 January, 1887, p. 332, 



Deed of Trust 341 

regulations for the proposed Scholarship', framed after con- 
sultation with the Lucasian and Cavendish Professors, and 
the executors of Mrs Clerk Maxwell. These were accepted 
by Grace 12 June, 1890'; and a Grace to seal the deed of 
trust passed the Senate 4 December, 1890*. 

Mrs Clerk Maxwell further bequeathed to the Cavendish 
Laboratory all the scientific books of her late husband*. 



Deed of Trust, dated 4 December, 1890. 

This Indenture made [4 December, 1890] between William Dyce JDooemUr, 
Cay of Blackford Road in the City of Edinburgh. ..the Reverend Patrick 
Thomas Clark of Gamrie in the County of Banff Minister, and Alexander 
David Martin Black of the City of Edinburgh Writer to the Signet of 
the one part and the Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the University 
of Cambridge of the other part. 

Whereas Katherine Mary Dewar or Clerk Maxwell and who resided JjJJ^wSiof 
at No. 11 Scroope Terrace Cambridge, the Widow of the late Professor JfcJ^^ 
James Clerk Maxwell of Middlebie by her Will or general trust dis- ^)2^,S, 
position and settlement dated [23 May, 1883] and registered in the Books 
of Council and Session at Edinburgh on [17 December, 1886] devised 
and bequeathed to the said William Dyce Cay and Patrick Thomas 
Clark... and the said Alexander David Martin Black... as Trustees and 
Trustee for the ends uses and purposes thereinafter mentioned All her 
estate and effects heritable and moveable and nominated and appointed 
her Trustees to be her sole executors and administrators declaring that 
her said General Trust Disposition and Settlement was granted in trust 
for the purposes thereinafter mentioned 

And by the Tenth section of the fourth purpose of her said Will Jjjf Jj^jjf* 
...after reciting that she was desirous to continue the advancement of viuioethoea 
those sciences to which the researches of her late husband were chiefly which her 
directed the Testatrix left and bequeathed the sum of Five thousand interested, 
pounds to be applied in founding a Scholarship in the Cavendish poooto 
Laboratory at Cambridge to be called The Clerk MaxweiU Scholarship gerk 
the student to hold the said Scholarship to be chosen by the Professor SchoUrehip. 
of Experimental Physics and by the Lucasian Professor of the University ^•otore. 
of Cambridge, and in case of any difference of opinion between them 
the final decision to rest with the Master of Trinity or any person oonditions 
appointed by him, the student to be so chosen to be or to have been a 
student in the Cavendish Laboratory aforesaid and both in the mode of 

1 Reporter, 90 May, 1890, p. 730. > Ibid. 17 Jane, p. 977. 

* Ibid. 9 December, p. 324. « Ibid. 11 January, 1887, p. 333. 



May* 1883. 



342 



Clerk Maxwell Scholarahij) 



Tenure to be 
for 3 yean. 

The bequest 
of £5000 
changed into 
a boqueat of 
redoiie. 



Death of 
teetatrlx 
121>ec 
1886. 



ProTlelons 
ofWlU 
carried out 



Residue 
amounts to 
).19*.3d. 



This sum is 
now paid to 
the uhan- 
oellor [eta] 
of the Uni- 
versity of 
Cambridge. 

This sum to 
be held on 
trustless 
certain sums 
to be paid 
out 01 it for 
legal ex- 
penses and 
others. 



his election and in the conditions of tenure of the Scholarship regard 
was to be had to the advancement by original research of the sciences 
of Electricity Magnetism and Heat or to those sciences especially which 
were advanced by the researches of her said husband. The Scholarship 
to be a University Scholarship and the tenure of it to be for three 
years... 

And whereas the said Katherine Mary Dewar or Clerk Maxwell 
duly made a second Codicil dated [16 October, 1 883] ^.. and as regards her 
residue she directed the same to be applied in founding the Scholarship 
in the Cavendish Laboratory at Cambridge... it being her wish and 
intention that that bequest of residue should come in place of the Five 
thousand pounds provided as aforesaid and should be subject to the 
same conditions as were specified with regard to the said Five thousand 
pounds... 

And whereas the said Katherine Mary Dewar or Clerk Maxwell 
died [12 December, 1886] without having revoked or altered her said 
Will or general trust disposition and settlement except so far as the 
same was revoked or altered by her said Codicils... 

And whereas the said Tnistees and Executors have in accordance 
with the directions in that behalf contained in the said Will... got in 
and converted all the estate and effects heritable and moveable not 
specifically devised or bequeathed of the said Katherine Mary Dewar or 
Clerk Maxwell (other than and except such sum or sums if any as are 
now or may hereafter become due to her estate from the Clarendon 
Press at Oxford in respect of a book on Electricity and Magnetism 
published through such Press by her late husband...) and have paid all 
her funeral and testamentary expenses and debts and all duties payable 
under the said Will. ..and paid or provided for the payments of pecuniary 
legacies and annuities bequeathed thereby and the net residue of the 
estate of the Testatrix... amounts to the sum of six thousand two 
hundred x)ounds nineteen shillings and three pence 

And whereas... the... Trustees and Executors aforesaid have this day 
paid the said sum... to the said Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the 
University of Cambridge to be held upon the trusts... hereinafter 
declared... (the receipt of which said sum... is hereby acknowledged) 

Now this Indenture witnesseth...that the said Chancellor Masters 
and Scholars of the University of Cambridge shall hold the said sum... 
and also the profits to be received from the Clarendon Press upon the 
trusts and subject to the powers and provisions upon with and subject 
to which the same ought to be held under or by virtue of the said Will 
...and in particular shall out of the said sum... reimburse themselves 
the sum of fifty six pounds and two pence being the costs and expenses 
incurred by the said Chancellor Masters and Scholars in or about the 



1 Certain provisions in the first and second codicil, here omitted, concern 
a bequest to one of the trustees. 



Deed of Trust 343 

receiving and obtaining payment of the same sum and in or about the 
preparation and execution of these presents... and shall invest the sum 
of Six thousand one hundred and forty four pounds nineteen shillings 
and one penny being the residue of the said simi of Six thousand two 
hundred poimds nineteen shillings and three pence (after the deduction 
of the said costs and expenses) and also the profits to be received 
from the Clarendon Press in the name of the said Chancellor Masters 
and Scholars of the University of Cambridge in or upon any one or 
more of the stocks fiinds or securities by law authorised for the invest- 
ment of trust moneys and may from time to time at their absolute 
discretion vary all or any of such investments for the time being into 
any other or others from time to time similarly authorised and shall 
from time to time receive the income of the said sum... or of the invest- 
ments for the time being representing the same... and by and out of the 
same income pay... and reimburse themselves and himself all expenses 
incurred in or about the receiving or obtaining payment of the said 
income or otherwise in or about the execution of the trusts of these 
presents or by reason thereof or incidentally thereto and also the 
expenses of varying the said investments or any of them from time to 
time as occasion shall require and all such other expenses for printing 
advertising or other purposes as the said Chancellor Masters and 
Scholars... shall approve and deem conducive to the purposes hereinafter 
expressed and shall from time to time apply the residue of the said 
income in the manner hereinafter directed and according to such scheme 
and under such regulations as are hereinafter mentioned which scheme 
and regulations have been duly approved by the said... Trustees as 
aforesaid and also by the Senate of the said University of Cambridge 

And thi8 Indenture also witnesseth that... it is hereby agreed and Scheme and 
declared that... the following Scheme and Regulations shall be estab- 
lished and take effect that is to say 

1. The said sum of six thousand one hundred and forty four 
pounds nineteen shillings and one penny and the investments for the 
time being representing the same and the profits to be received from 
the Clarendon Press shall be called the Capital Fund of the Clerk The Capital 
Maxwell Scholarship and shall be invested in the name of the Chancellor 
Masters and Scholars of the University of Cambridge. 

The rest of the regttlatums (2—16) are identical with those a^ccepted 
by Grace 12 June, 1890, and are printed in the Ordinances^ ed. 1901, pp. 
663—666. 

In witness whereof the said William Dyce Cay Patrick Thomas 
Clark and Alexander David Martin Black have hereunto set their hands 
and seals and the said Chancellor Masters and Scholars have caused 
their Common Seal to be affixed to these presents the day and year first 
above written ^ 

> Registry of the University, Box G, No. 27. 



VII. 

MEMORIAL STUDENTSHIPS 
AND MEMORIAL FUNDS 



Balfour Memorial Ml 



1. Balfour Memorial. 
1883. 

(a) The Studentship and Fund. 

In 1882 the Council of the Senate, in recognition of the 
value of the scientific work and teaching done by Francis 
Maitland Balfour, Fellow of Trinity College (B.A. 1874, 
M.A. 1877), proposed, in a report dated 27 March, that a 
Professorship of Animal Morphology, terminable with the 
tenure of the first Professor, should be established in the 
University. The following extract fi-om this report deserves 
quotation : 

The successful and rapid development of biological teaching in 
Cambridge, so honourable to the reputation of the University, has 
been formally brought to the notice of the CounciL It appears that 
the Classes are now so large that the accommodation provided but a 
few years ago has already become insufficient, and that plans for ex- 
tending it are now occupying the attention of the Museums and 
Lecture-Rooms Syndicate. 

It is well known that one branch of this teaching, viz. that of 
Animal Morphology, has been created in Cambridge by the efforts of 
Mr F. M. Balfour, and that it has grown to its present importance 
through his ability as a teacher and his scientific reputation. 

The service to the interests of Natural Science thus rendered by 
Mr Balfour having been so far generously given without any adequate 
Academical recognition, the benefit of its continuance is at present 
entirely unsecured to the University, and the progresH of the depart- 
ment under his direction remains liable to sudden check. 

It has been urgently represented to the Council that the welfare of 
biological studies at Cambridge demands that Mr Balfour's department 
should be placed on a recognised and less precarious footing, and in this 
view the Council concur. They are of opinion that all the requirements 
of the case will be best met by the immediate establishment... of a 
Professorship of Animal Morphology terminable with the tenure of the 
first Professor. 

The Council have been in communication with the Board of Natural 
Science Studies, who have expressed their hearty concurrence with the 
proposal. 



848 Balfour Memorial 

The Council therefore recommend that there shall be established in 
the University a Professorship of Animal Morphology...*. 

A Grace to establish the Professorship passed the Senate 
11 May', and Mr Balfour was elected, 31 May, 1882. 

In the following June Mr Balfour went to Switzerland, 
to recruit his health after an attack of typhoid fever; and 
(18 July) started from Cormayeur to ascend the Aiguille 
Blanche de Peuteret. On this excursion he and his guide 
lost their lives'. 

On Saturday, 21 October, 1882, a meeting was held at 
the New Museums, to consider the most appropriate form of 
memorial to Professor Balfour. The Vice-Chancellor took 
the chair, and many of the most distinguished members of 
the University, with a number of men of science from a 
distance, were present. After deciding that some memorial 
should be established, it was agreed : 

I. That the Memorial take the form of a Fund, to be called the 
Balfour Fund, for the promotion of research in Biology, especially 
Animal Morphology; 

II. That the proceeds of the Fund be applied ; 

(1) to establish a Studentship, the holder of which shall 
devote himself to original research in Biology, especially Animal 
Morphology ; 

(2) to further, by occasional grants of money, original re- 
search in the same subject. 

III. That a Committee be appointed to collect subscriptions and 
to draw up conditions, under which, with the sanction of the subscribers 
at a future meeting, the Fund shall be offered to the University^. 

The meeting referred to in the third resolution was held 
26 May, 1883, when it appeared that so large a sum had 

^ Reporter, 28 March, 1882, p. 427. The regulations for the Professor- 
ship are appended to the report. When the report was disoussed in the Arts 
School, 8 May (Ibid. p. 582), the Yice-ChanceUor stated that the action of 
the Council had been suggested by Mr Michael Foster ; and read extracts 
from a letter written by him in which it was mentioned, among other 
things, that Mr Balfour had declined the chair of Natural Histozy in the 
University of Edinburgh, and had refused to become a candidate for the 
Linaore Professorship in the Umversity of Oxford. 

* Beporter, 16 May, 1882, p. 651. 

» Diet. Nat. Biogr. Vol. iii. pp. 60—52. 

* ReporUr, 31 October, 1882, pp. 106—114. 



Balfour Memorial 349 

been subscribed that £6500 invested capital might be handed 
over to the University so soon as the Regulations (which 
were approved by the meeting) were accepted by the Senate*. 
When these, however, were discussed (2 June) they encoun- 
tered much hostile criticism', and were referred back to the 
Committee for revision. Amended regulations* were approved 
by the Senate, and the oflfer of the subscribers was accepted, 
14 June, 1883*. The first Balfour Student was appointed 
18 October. 

When the balance of the fimd was handed over to the 
University, the treasurer wrote to the Vice-Chancellor 
(6 March 1888) informing him of the names of the subscribers, 
and enclosing a detailed balance-sheet of the receipts and 
expenses of the fund'. 

It appeared bom this letter that the subscriptions, 
amounting to £8451, might be summarized as follows: 

£ «. d. 
His Qrace the Duke of Devonshire, E.G., M.A., 

F.RS., Trinity College, Chancellor of the 

University 250 

The Earl Powis, LL.D., St John's College, High 

Steward of the University . . . . 25 

Subscribed collectively by Bachelors and Under- 
graduates at the rooms of the Cambridge 
Union Society 170 9 

Subscribed collectively in America^ per H. Newell 
Martin, M.A., F.R.S., Christ's College, Pro- 
fessor of Biology at Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, Baltimore, U.S. 125 11 8 

The Family of the late Professor Balfour . . 3000 

Bequeathed by Professor Balfour to Professor 

Foster for a scientific purpose . . 1000 

Other subscriptions*^ 3879 19 4 

£8461 



1 Reporter, 29 May, 1888, p. 769. 

s Ibid. 5 June, p. 802. These regulations, with a covering letter from the 
treasurer, are in the Reporter, 29 May, pp. 749—752. 

> Ibid. 12 June, p. 882. They are printed in Ordinances, ed. 1901, 
pp. 462—467. 

« Ibid. 19 June, p. 948. » Ibid. 14 MarcAi, 1888, p. 689. 

^ A list of these is given in the Reporter, ut supra. 



360 John Lucas Walker Stvdmtship 



(6) The Balfour Library. 

The following letter describes the gift of Professor 
Balfour's Library: 

Museum of Zoology and Comparative Anatomt, 
10 October, 1882. 

Dear Mr Vice-Chancbllor, 
I have to inform you that the family of the late Professor Balfour 
has presented his Scientific Library to the University, for the use of 
the Morphological Laboratory. 

It consists of rather more than 500 volumes, together with upwards 
of 1100 pamphlets, bound in 77 volumes. This latter portion of the 
Library is particularly valuable, as Professor Balfoiu* had taken great 
pains to collect the most important papers in Morphology and Embr^'o- 
logy; and so extensive a series, especially when arranged, as this is, 
according to subject, places before students the most important informa- 
tion on any given group of animals, without the trouble of reference to 
Journals and Transactions. 

Besides these works on Morphology, about sixty volumes on general 
science have been presented to the Philosophical Library. 

I am, [etc.] 

J. W. CLARK 

(Superintendejit) K 

A room at the New Museums, attached to the Department 
of Morphology, has been fitted up to contain this Library. 



2. John Lucas Walker Studentship. 

1887. 

The circumstances under which this Studentship was 
founded are detailed in the following letter written to the 
Vice-Chancellor 4 November, 1886, by Sir Richard Everard 
Webster, M.A., of Trinity College, then Attorney-General. 
His friend, Mr John Lucas Walker, was of the same college 
(LL.B. 1867). 

1 Reporter, 17 October, 1882, p. 58. 



John Lucas WcAker Studentship 351 

2 Pump Court, Temple, E.C., 
4 November^ 1886. 

Dear Mr Vicb-Chancellor, 
By the will of my friend, Mr John Lucas Walker, the sum of 
£10,000 was left to me to be spent as I should think best '4n the 
promotion, without regard to sect or party, of Scientific and Literary 
Eoaearch or of either of those objects in Cambridge or in the Metropolis 
or in both places.*' 

After careftil consultation with Professor Husley, Sir James Paget, 
Professor Roy, and several others, I have determined upon the scheme 
enclosed with a view to the establishment of the John Lucas Walker 
Studentship. 

I have to ask you to be good enough to place the scheme before the 
University and to take the necessary steps that it may be accepted. 

You will observe by the terms of the bequest it was intended that 
the money should be applied at Cambridge or London or both places 
at my discretion, and I have associated the President of the College of 
Physicians as one of the Board of Managers in order that from time to 
Ume there may be a fair chance of ascertaining the names of suitable 
candidates in London. 

The above information will probably be sufficient for you, but should 
you require any further particulars I shall be pleased to supply them. 

I am, [etc.] 

RICHARD E. WEBSTER!. 
The scheme, otherwise called the regulations, mentioned 
above was published in the same number of the Reporter as 
the letter. Afber discussion (25 November)" and revision by 
Sir R. E. Webster, it was republished in an amended form, 
28 February, 1887', and accepted by the following Grace, 
which passed the Senate 10 March, 1887, but not without 
opposition : 

That the John Lucas Walker Fund for the fiurtherance of original 
research in Pathology, which has been ofifered to the University by 
Sir R. E. Webster, M.A., of Trinity College, Her Majesty's Attorney- 
General, be accepted : that the Amended Regulations, dated February 
10, 1887, be approved : and that the Vice-Chancellor be authorised to 
convey the thanks of the University to the Attorney-General*. 

The first Scholar wi^s elected June 10, 1887. 

1 Reporter, 9 November, 1886, p. 122. 

s Ibid. 30 November, 1886, p. 216. 

s Ibid. 1 March, 1887, p. 466. The scheme and regulations, signed by 
Sir B. £. Webster, are printed in Ordinances , ed. 1901, pp. 474-479. 

« Ibid. 16 March, p. 688. The numbers were: Placet, 140; Non 
placet, 26. 



362 Prendergast Studentship 



3. Prendergast Studentship. 
1888. 

This Studentship was founded in 1888, by Mrs Prender- 
gast, to commemorate her husband. Colonel Guy Lushington 
Prendergast, sometime of Trinity College. The Master and 
Fellows of Trinity College are trustees of the fund. 

The following letter, addressed to the Viee-Chancellor, 
explains the intentions of the foundress : 

14, FopsTONE Road, Earl's Court, S.W., 
9th January, 1888. 
Reverend and Dear Sir, 

The Widow of my Father the late Guy Lushington Prendergast 
having expressed a desire to perpetuate his memory by founding a 
Greek Studentship of One hundred Poimds (£100) per anmun at the 
University of Cambridge, I have been advised by the Reverend the 
Master of Trinity, to whom I mentioned the subject, to submit an 
application to you, with a view to its being taken into consideration 
with as little delay as possible. I will only state the general outline, 
leaving details to be filled in as you and the University authorities may 
deem expedient. 

1. It is desired that the Benefaction should bear my Father's name. 

2. That the Studentship should definitely and expressly encourage 
the study of Greek, to which my Father was so devoted. 

3. That the Studentship should be tenable by Bachelors of Arts, 
and carry with it the obligation to prosecute research in the Greek 
Language, Literatiu^ Archaeology, and Arts. 

4. The period for which the Studentship should be held emd the 
question as to whether it would be of greater value to the University if 
it were only open to competition on alternate years when the value 
would be £200 instead of £100 must be left for your consideration. 

6. It is desired that the Studentship should be limited to men only. 

6. My father having kept ten terms at Trinity College i, and having 
there acquired his great love for literature in general, and for Greek 
literature in particular, it is desired that the authorities of Trinity 
CoUege shall, if possible, be specially associated with the memorial, 
either as trustees or in any other form which^ may commend itself to 
you.... 

Believe me, [etc.] 

GUY A. PRENDERGAST, 
Colonel, 

^ He matriculated 18 Noyember, 1S24, but did not proceed to a degree. 



Isaac Newton Studentships 363 

The Council of the Senate, to whom the above letter was 
referred, were of opinion that Mrs Prendergast's oflfer should 
be accepted, and, after communication with the Master of 
Trinity College, drew up regulations which were sent to 
Colonel Prendergast and approved by him. These regula- 
tions, with Colonel Prendergast's letter, were embodied in a 
report to the Senate dated 4 June, 1888, which ended with 
the following recommendations : 

1. That the Common Seal of the University be aflaxed to a Deed 
of Settlement in triplicate* by Mrs Elizabeth Sophia Prendergast of a 
fund amounting to three thousand six hundred and thirty-six pounds 
ten shillings, two poimds fifteen shillings per cent, annuities, to be 
called The Prendergast Fwnd^ for establishing, in memory of the late 
Colonel Prendergast, formerly of Trinity College, a Prendergast Student- 
ship in the University of Cambridge for the furtherance of study and 
research in the Greek Language, Literature, History, Philosophy, 
ArchfiBology and Art; and that the thanks of the University be con- 
veyed to Mrs Prendergast for her generous gift. 

2. That the Begulations contained in this Report be the regulations 
for the Prendergast Fund and Studentship. 

These recommendations were confirmed by Grace 7 June, 
1888; and the deed of settlement was sealed on the following 
day. The regulations therein contained are identical with 
those confirmed by the Senate as above*. The Vice-Chancellor 
announced the election of the first student 30 April, 1890. 



4. LsAAc Newton Studentships. 
1891. 

These studentships were endowed by Frank M^Clean, M. A., 
of Trinity College', in 1890. He wrote as follows to the Vice- 
Chancellor (H. M. Butler, D.D., Master of Trinity College): 

^ One part was retained by Mrs Prendergast ; one by Trinity CoUege ; 
and the third by the Uniyersity (Begistry, Box G, No. 28). 

* Reporter, 5 Jnne, 1888, pp. 778—780, 840. For the regalations see 
Ordinances, ed. 1901, pp. 479—481. 

> Frank M«01ean proceeded B.A. 1859; M.A. 186S. 

C. 23 



864 Isaac Newton Sttidentships 

RusTHALL House, Tunbridoe Wells, 
3rrf November^ 1890. 

Mt dear Sir, 

I was encouraged by the invitation for outside assistance con- 
tained in your recent Address on the reopening of the Senate of the 
University* to write to you on the 3rd October last, submitting an 
ofifer of the sum of £12,000 for the purpose of founding three University 
Studentships in connection with the Sciences of Astronomy and Light. 

Subsequently, by your kind proposal, I came to Cambridge on the 
Ist inst for the piurpose of meeting yourself, Professor Stokes, Professor 
Cayley, Professor Darwin and Dr Glaisher, and of talking the matter 
over with you and them. 

With the advantage thus gained, I now beg to submit to you my 
ofier to place securities of the value named in the hands of Trinity 
College as Trustees, for the purpose of founding the Studentships. 

They are to be devoted to the study of Astronomy (especially 
Gravitational Astronomy, but also including the other branches of 
Astronomy and Astronomical Physics) and Physical Optics. 

They are to be called The Imoc Newton StvdenUhipe. One 
Studentship to be filled annually, and to be tenable for three yeara 
The candidate elected to be a Bachelor of Arts under 25 years of age, 
and to be of the highest attainments in the subjects named and in the 
branches of Mathematics applicable to them. 

The various questions relating to the mode of election, the condi- 
tions of tenure, the formation of a reserve fund arising from casual 
vacancies, and the possible application of any surplus income to the 
purchase of apparatus, to be provided for in the Regulations in such a 
way as may be agreed upon. 

So soon as the R^ulations and other preliminary steps are settled, 
the Securities set out in the note below to be handed over to the 
Trustees. 

I remain, [etc.] 

FRANK M<X3LEAN». 

This offer having been referred to the Council of the 
Senate, they requested Sir G. Q. Stokes, Professor Cayley, 
Professor Darwin, and Dr Glfl.iBher to confer with Mr FVank 
M'Clean on the subject of his generous offer to found Student- 
ships in Astronomy and Physical Optics. As a result of this 

* Address to the Senate on resiigning the office of Vice-OhanoeUor, 
1 October, 1890. Reporter, p. 82. \ 

' Reporter, 11 November, 1890, )?. 190. Mr M«Clean subsequently 
increased hy £100 Stock each of the s^ms of Stock originally offered. 



Arnold Qerstenberg St^identship 366 

conference the above-named members of the Senate drew 
up regulations which Mr M^Clean approved, and which the 
Council submitted to the Senate in a report dated 16 February, 
1891*. It concluded with the following recommendations : 

I. That the offer of Mr Frank M<<^ean of securities to the value of 
about £12,500, for the founding of Isaac Newton Studentships in 
Astronomer and Physical Optics, be accepted. 

II. That the seal of the University be affixed to a letter of thanks 
to Mr Frank M^'Clean, written by the Public Orator, for his munificent 
benefaction. 

III. That the following Regulations for the Isaac Newton Student- 
ships be approved by the University. 

These recommendations were confirmed by Grace 5 March', 
the Orator's letter was directed to be sealed 12 March, and 
the first Student was elected 4 November, 1891. 



5. Arnold Qerstenberg Studentship. 
1892. 

This Studentship was endowed in 1892 by Mrs Leonora 
Philipps, in accordance with the wishes of her brother, the 
late Arnold Qerstenberg of Trinity College (B.A. 1884), who 
bequeathed to her £2000 for that purpose. The intentions 
of Mrs Philipps and her brother as set forth in the Deed of 
Trust printed below, were to promote the study of Moral 
Philosophy and Metaphysics among students of Natural 
Science, irrespective of sex. 

The Senate were informed of the proposed Studentship 
by a report of the Council, dated 22 February, 1892', in 
which they recommended that the offer should be accepted, 
and proposed regulations. After discussion in the Arts 
School (2 March)* an amended report was issued (9 May)', 

^ Reporter, 17 Febniary, 1891, p. 611. For the regnlations see Ordi- 
nancet, ed. 1901, pp. 482—486. 
> Ibid. 10 March, 1891, p. 638. 

» Ibid. 23 Februaiy, 1892, p. 681. « Ibid. p. 598. 

» Ibid. p. 768. 

23—2 



356 Arnold Gerstenberg StudeiUship 

and confirmed 19 May, but not without opposition \ The 
Vice-Chancellor was at the same time directed to thank 
Mrs Philipps. 

A Grace to seal the Deed of Trust passed the Senate 
15 December, 18921 



19 Dec. 1892. 
Parties to 
the deed. 



Mr Arnold 
Ci^rstenberg 
desired to 
found a 
Scholarship 
or student- 
ship. 
Subject. 



)be. 
queathed for 
above pur- 
pose to Mrs 
Philipps. 



Scheme and 
regulations 
for such 
Scholanhip 
confirmed by 
the Senate 
19 May, 1892. 



Objects of 
the foun- 
tlation. 



Deed of Trust, dated 19 December, 1892. 

This Indenture made [19 December 1892] between Leonora Philippe 
of 24 Queen Anne's Gate in the County of Middlesex the Wife of John 
Wynford Philipps of the same place Esquire M.P. of the first part The 
Master Fellows and Scholars of the College of the Holy and Undivided 
Trinity within the Town and University of Cambridge... of the second 
part and The Chancellor Masters and Scholars of the University of 
Cambridge... of the third part 

Whereas the said Leonora Philipps is desirous of carrying out the 
express wish of her Brother Arnold Gerstenberg late of Trinity College 
aforesaid now deceased that after his death she should found a Scholar- 
ship or Studentship at Cambridge which should have for its object the 
promotion of the Study of Moral Philosophy and Metaphysics among 
Students of Natural Science 

And whereas the said Arnold Gerstenberg who died [31 October, 
1887] by his Will dated [19 April, 1886] bequeathed to the said Leonora 
Philipps a sum of two thousand pounds and it is well known to the 
said Leonora Philipps that it was the wish of the said Arnold Gersten- 
berg that she should apply the money for the purpose of such a 
Scholarship or Studentship as aforesaid but no trust whatever was 
imposed upon her so to do 

And whereas the said Leonora Philipps recently proposed to the 
University to institute such a Studentship to be awarded under such 
scheme and in accordance with such regulations and conditions as are 
mentioned in the Report of the. Council of the Senate of the University 
dated [9 May, 1892] a copy of which is set forth in the Schedule here- 
under written And whereas the said Report was confirmed and the 
said proposal accepted by Grace of the Senate dated [19 May, 1892] 

And whereas the said scheme regulations and conditions were 
framed with the view of carrying out as effectually as may be the 
object of the foundation hereinbefore referred to the said Leonora 
Philipps being of opinion that the recognition apart from distinctions 

1 Reporter, 24 May, 1892, p. 814. The numbers were: Placet 88; Non 
placet 19. These regulatious, which are identical with those set forth in the 
schedule attached to the Deed of Trust, are printed in Ordinances, ed. 1901, 
pp. 486—489. 

3 Ibid. 21 December, 1892, p. 881. 



Deed of Trust 



357 



of sex or sect of all Students aa eligible to the Studentship by virtue of 
their having for their common object the search for truth and enlight- 
enment will advance the Study of Moral Philosophy and Metaphysics 
among those who have the important advantage of a thorough training 
in Natural Science and thus tend to increase the number of thinkers 
adequately prepared for dealing with the deepest problems of Philosophy 

And whereas the said Leonora Philipps has accordingly paid the 
sum of two thousand pounds to the College (the receipt whereof is 
hereby acknowledged) to the intent that they shall stand possessed 
thereof upon the trusts and with and subject to the powers and provi- 
sions hereinafter declared and contained concerning the same 

Now this Indenture witnesseth that it is hereby agreed and declared 
between and by the parties hereto that the College shall hold the said 
sum of two thousand pounds Upon trust to invest the same in the name 
of the College in any one or more of the modes of investment for the time 
being by law authorised for the investment of trust monies with power 
from time to time to vary or transpose all or any of such investments 
into or for others or another similarly authorised And upon further 
trust out of the income of the said smn of two thousand pounds or the 
investments for the time being representing the same (hereinafter 
called the trust fund) to pay and discharge or reimburse themselves all 
costs or expenses incurred in or about the receiving or obtaining pay- 
ment of the said income or any change of investment or otherwise in or 
about the execution of these Presents... and also to pay and dischaige 
all expenses including the remimeration (if any) of Examiners and 
Adjudicators and any costs of printing or advertising which the Uni- 
versity and the Board of Managers hereby constituted or either of 
them shall incur in or about the execution of the trusts of these 
Presents or by reason thereof or incidentally thereto and all such other 
costs and expenses, if any, as the College and the University shall from 
time to time approve and deem conducive to the purposes of these 
Presents And upon trust to pay the residue of the said income to the 
person for the time being entitled thereto as the holder of